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VOLUME VII., No. 1. 
Office, No. 532 Merchant street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. MAY 25, 1867. 



TERMS, 



i $5 a Tear, by Mail, in Advance 
'50 Cents a Month, by Carrier 



CONTENTS: 

Original: Dignity, by Prentice; Sinipkins' Touching Confidence in 
Newspaper Advice, by Trem ; Jugglery and Spiritualism; Authority 
and Belief; Literary Gleanings: The Gorilla Controversy; Du 
Chaillu and Winwood Reade ; Three Live Gorillas ; Local Art Notes 
by Astrasa; Local Architectural Notes by " X." " Lion's Mouth :" 
What the Potrero Hogs Said and Thought ; Ladies Wearing the 
Mustn'tmentionems ; Leading the World ; Dramatic Affairs ; The 
Opera etc. Selected i Our Astor House Breakfast, a story ; A Sea- 
Chase'; "Black Sheep" Concluded; A Very Pleasant Evening; 
Poetry. Paragraphs, etc. 



THE LION'S MOUTH. 

« Tab gravest beast is an ass, the gravest bird is an owl, the gravest flsn 
is an oyster, and the gravest man is a fool." Sydney Smith. 

" I will roar, that I will do any man's heart good to hear me." 
i wuxrtmi, A Midsummer Night's Dream. 

" I win aggravate my voico so, that I will roar you as gently as any suck- 
i ng dove ; I will roar you an 't wero any nightingale." 
-' Nil falsi audeat, nil oeri nnn audeat dicere," 



IniD. 

ClCEBO. 



The Lion's Month. 

Once a Week, in a sketch of the haunts of harmony in London, 
devotes considerable space to a description of Evans', the most fash- 
ionable and well-known music and supper hall in London. It has the 
following concerning one of the chief ornaments of the old hall— the 
Lion's Mouth : 

" A curious head, described in certain numbers of the Guardian for 
trie year 1713, and designed as a box for the reception of literary con- 
tributions, was purchased by Mr. Richardson, the late proprietor of 
' Evans'.' against the Duke of Norfolk, and treated to a post of honor 
above the chiunnev-piece in the old music room. It bore a fanciful 
resemblance to a lion, and its claws were of the most formidable de- 
scription. It was put up at Button's Coffee House in July 1713, removed 
to the Shakspeare Tavern in 1781, and bought by Mr. Richardson on 
the 8th of November 1809. .It was described by its proprietoras being 
' indeed a proper- emlflem of knowledge and action, for it was 'all 
h- <*i*iiaws.' • Its features ! add? 'the writer, are strong and well 
furrowed.' The ' whiskers ' gamed the admiration of every one that 
saw them." 

Entente Cordiale. 

We always believed thoroughly in the truth of the saying " extremes 
meet." Extremes are meeting fast in the world of journalism. The 
radically Republican Flag is doing everything in its power to concili- 
ate the radically Democratic Examiner— the only paper for which at 
present it has a good word to say. In Wednesday's issue it said : 
" We borrow and express the fullest reliance on the judgement of the 
Examiner." It is only right to Bay that the judgement of the Ex- 
aminer was on this occasion given not with regard to reconstruction, 
universal suffrage or the execution ol Mrs. Surratt, but the merits of 
the Mexican poet SehorGullurdo's drama entitled The Sorceress of 
Cordova. Notwithstanding this, we advise the radical subscribers to 
the Flag to keep an eye on it. Who knows but what it may not 
amalgamate with the Examiner. 

A Very Small Affair. 

The Flag thus describes the " St. James' Picnic :" 
" The Sunday School, some eight mutes, a number of policemen, 
detailed for the purpose, with their wives and friends, left on the 
steamer Contra Costa to go to Saucelito." 

How some eight mutes, and a number of policemen, detailed for the 
purpose, with their wives and friends cau be called a Sunday School 
we cannot imagine. We are afterward told that, " groups of hungry, 
sedate people assembled sub tegminnie fagi, in all the freedom of the 
country, to eat their lunches." What sort of a minniea " tegminiiie 
is we do not know. A Tityrns or two, thrown round loose among the 
eight mntes, and the policemen's wives and friends, would have given 
a classic air to this description of the St, James' Picnic. 

A Libel on tile Jews. 

The Hebrew National, a new Jewish weekly published in London, 
complains that the last English edition of Webster's Dictionary con- 
tains the verb "to jew," and defines it as "to cheat," " to swindle." 
It is a positive fact that this verb is in common use among all classes 
in England, and perhaps it may be used iu the same manner among 
Stockholders in the insurance companies in New York ; but we hold it 
not right that it should be so set down, and we do not wonder at the 
indignation manifested by the Hebrew National. On asking a Tea" 
touic Hebrew his opinion on the subject he said : " Oh yes, 'to jew,' 
das ist right. 1 know the word ; but is is not to scheat. ' To jew ' — 
das ist pusiness." 

The Oakland Ponndmaster. 

The ponndmaster in Oakland does not employ his time in running 
afle little dogs and catching them. He catches hogs. The other day 
he caught Mr. Hogan's hog, and Mr. Hogan the next time he passed 
him swore like a man and grunted an imitation of a hog. The pound- 
master not taking into consideration the fact that Mr. Hogan was only 
swearing to himself, and had aright to recall to his recollection the 
voices of his lost ones by grunting, had him arrested. We should like 
to hear anyone whose dog had been taken to the pound bark when our 
pouudmaster passed him — he would very toon gel muzzled. 



What the Potrero Hogs Said and Thought. 

" We are becoming famous. There is an excitement in the city 
over yonder relative to our removal to some more distaut point. The 
race hereabout complain of us. They say we do Dot furuisti tbem 
with the odors of Arabv the Blest. Quite the reverse. For my part 
I am glad. Why do they thus imprison us. Why give they not to us 
the freedom of these hills ? Curse them. They drive us, they impound 
us, and finally murder us. May my flesh abound iu trichina after 
death for their benefit." 

So spake Gobble, an old hog, to his companions about the feeding 
trough. Gobble stood with both fore feet in his breakfast. Not 
merely his own breakfast, but that of three or four diminutive pigs 
who loudly clamored in his rear, and vainly sought to squeeze them- 
selves into their places at the table. 

"What a bore that Gobble is," said Mrs. Wallow, a sharp nosed, 
vinegar-faced sow with nine small children at the breast. " Old Gob- 
ble is always ready to talk of the wrong and oppression of others, 
but be takes very good care to get his own fill of swill if others do 
suffer. Even now he robs four of my last year's children of their 
breakfast." 

" And he their father too, is he not V said a spruce young barrow. 
" I believe he is," said Mrs. Wallow reflectively. 
Grunt came along talking, squealing aud singing boisterously. He 
was half drunk with mash from the distilleries. 

" What is mun J" said he, " that he claims superiority over us. He 
is a carniverons beast. So am I. He is a graminiverous brute. So 
am I. Is he particularly clean about his person ? Neither am I. In 
real common sense, I am his superior. I live solely and entirely for 
happiness. I am not ashamed so to act as to secure happiness To be 
happy, I bathe in mud. I have seen meu ashamed to eat line swill out 
out of a common trough. They were afraid of each other. Bosh ! 

At that moment a tremendous squealing of rejoicing arose from a 
group of bogs gathered iu the centre of the pen. What was the mat- 
ter 7 Gobble turned half round and was on the point of so forgetting 
himself as to leave his breakfast. A moment's reflection suggested to 
him the stern truth of the four little pigs behind him. He awaited the 
event like a philon-mber. Gninl slopped his bubbling. Mrs. Wallow 
carried away by curiosity, deserted her infant progeny and ran to- 
ward the excited crowd. They were gathered about the scrap of a 
morning paper wafted thither by the wind. An elderly swine, after 
putting on his spectacles, read aloud the following opinion of Judge 
Rix: 

" If they, (the hog ranchers,) after gaining all the time possible by 
coutinuauces, demand jury trials, and after conviction, appeal the 
cases to the County Coui t.they are pick liug a pretty rod for the backs." 

Lending the World. 

" The United States are the vanguard of freedom" says the Alia. 
" Vanguard of freedom" is good, but it was said before. To continue, 
the Alia further remarks : " It has fallen to our lot to lead the world 
for a century or two at least iu breaking the social, political and re- 
ligious bonds in which our race was bound in semi-barbarous times, 
and iu which it has languished for several thousand years." There is 
an alarming looseness aud recklessness in speaking of a century or 
two, as if a century was a period of little weight in the Alta's esti- 
mation. In 1767 the United states' did not lead the world entirely. 
Besides there were no United -States at that period. Perhaps, how- 
ever, we are hypercritical. The Alta doubtless refers to the spirit of 
the people and its effects on the world, rather than to any special gov 
eruiental organization. Still we did not lead the world entirely at that 
period, and we are sure we did not iu lfi67, which is only going back 
a hundred years. There were a few thinkers, writers, philosophers 
and statesmen iu Europe "a century ago" who helped lead the world. 
Hai-d on the English Aristocracy. 
A Mr. Jobson, who has lately arrived here by way of Australia, in- 
formed one paper in this city that he was a connection of the Duke of 
Wellington, aud on the Times informing the people of this city that 
they had " a recently imported celebrity among them," sent a commu- 
nication to that paper in which he said " he was anything but proud of 
his connection with the aristocracv of England," aud also said " it had 
cost him dear." This is hard on the aristocracy, and we are sure if 
they were aware that Jobson was saying such things of them they 
would be very much annoyed. We understand that Emperor Norton 
is in a towering passion, and intends to issue a proclamation against 
Jobson immediately. He says either he or Jobson must leave the 
city. 

The Poor. 

The Call says in an article relative to the seven thousand four hun- 
dred and five persons relieved by the San Francisco Benevolent Asso. 
ciation, " The poor we have always among us." That is so. Pov- 
erty is a commodity always in market, never inquired for or wanted, 
and the supply is always largely in excess of the demand. 

Inquiry Financial and Im-Bltolical. 
" Are we to have a financial crash ?" is a question often asked in 
the East. In San Francisco more are interested in the daily mental 
uquiry, "Are we to have a brandy smash !'' 



A Terrible Endemic. 

San Francisco has escaped the epidemics which have troubled other 
cities ; there has been no cholera here, no rinderpest and hut little dip- 
theria. Under these circumstances our citizens can sustain themselves 
with great fortitude, though the endemic of " Correspondence from 
the Southern Coast " is raging. The Alta has broken out in boils, 
blains and putrefying sores. Vile, ungramatical eruptions appear on 
its face daily. It is inoculated with Santa Cruz virus, aud will shortly 
exhibit the Warm Springs, Calistoga and Crystal Springs varieties of 
the endemic. On Thursday, the Bulletin caught it. " K " wrote 
" from the Southern Coast" on "Some Cheese," "Wild Mustard'' 
"Santa Maria Plains," " Foxeus " aud other terrible subjects. He 
tells the intelligent public of San Francisco that he learned from a 
" teat puller " that Judge Steele is making 450 pounds of cheese a 
day. He then recommends the aforesaid Judge's wild mustard as 
being of "a tine quality for table use." "K" is the best of these 
horrible prowling correspondents who have as yet blistered the col- 
umns of the daily press, but he is bad enough. Who on earth wants 
to know anything about Santa Barbara, wild mustard, and teat pullers ? 
When it begins to get hot iu San Francisco all the people who have 
money to spend will leave it — for some warmer place— and those 
whose business or impecuniosity compells them to remain in town, 
will suffer daily torture from correspondents who wish to make those 
they have left behind them as miserable as possible. 



Ladies Wearing the Mustn't-n&ention-'cnis. 

There was a terrible commotion in San Francisco when Mrs De 
Wolf first appeared in public in unwhi6perables, and most of the 
ladies were shocked. If the Appeal is to be believed, the ladies of 
Marysville have come to the conclusion that, though improppr for a 
walking costume, the what-d'ye-call-'ems are quite correct on horse- 
back. This paper says : 

" They propose to throw away the cumbersome and horse-scaring 
flounces and adopt the Turkish style of habit, use the male saddle, 
and mount their steeds the same as ' other folks.' " 

This is just simply an excuse for wearing the aforesaid articles of 
apparel which every married lady is supposed to covet. If ladies 
must ride on horses man-fashion they should adopt the style of hab 
worn by the Sandwich Island ladies. The Appeal says further : 

" The ladies have been taking this matter under Berious consideration 
of late, and have bravely resolved to defy old fogyism'and ride as 
sense and comfort dictate. We understand a party of five or six 
of our most respectable citizens are preparing their Turkish dresses, 
aud will be ready to take the air ou horseback the latter part of this 
week." 

They had better not come down to San Francisco orthey^will be ar- 
rested. Turkish dresses forsooth ! Perhaps the dissolute editor of the 
Appeal (he caunot be a virtuous respectable man as all our San Fran- 
cisco editors are) would like to see otlier Turkish habits introduced 
among the ladies of Marysville. 

Summer Sports. 

It ia rather amusing to hear Englishmen abusing the Climate of San 
Francisco. The merry month of|May must be delightful. The fol- 
lowing dispatch reached us by the cable : 

" London, May 23— The Derby was won by Hermit. There was 
an immense crowd in attendance. A snow storm prevailed during the 
race." 

The merry May days of England appear to be "played out," as 
we say in California. A race in a snow Btorm is a pleasing novelty. 
We must, however, state injustice to the climate of England, had as 
it really is, a snow storm in May is quite a 6tranger, but we doubt if 
Englishmen as a stranger give it welcome. 

« Local Art Items." 

Under this head the Bulletin of yesterday informs its readers that 
four young men took the Petalnma boat, on the day previous, on their 
way for a tour through the coast range country to Yreka and thence 
to Portland, Oregon. The Bulletin says that these young men— all 
unknown to Fame— are " well supplied with materials for making oil 
sketches." All things considered, we think that San Frahcisco peo- 
ple and newspapers had better encourage and try to support the really 
good artists already here, instead of petting youug beginners in art, 
who, if they stay here, will starve. 

An Immoral Atmosphere. 

We find the following paragraph in one of our exchanges : 
"Three of the Japanese gymnasts got drunk at Hartford recently 
fought the police, and were finally locked up for the night." 

The above fact, if it is a fact, is very discreditable to Hartford. 
None of the Japanese gymnasts got drunk in San Francisco. But 
that is always the way as soon as people get out of the moral atmos- 
phere of San Francisco thev become demoralized. We tremble when 
we think that even Tom Maguire's morals may become corrupted m 
the East. 

Highly Important from England. 

The important information that the Star " says it will bo ft orime 
to execute the Fenians " came over the wires this week. There is a 
little penny paper of that name published in London, but its opinion is 
of very little value either iu England or Ireland. As we earned by 
dspatdies sent across the cable tnati • was not fcL«trf 
the Fenians would be hanged, the opinion of the i>tar is particularly 
valuable to citiaena of San Fraucisco 



2 



The Californian. 




BY EDMUND YATES. 
Author oj " Land at Last," " Kissing tint Rod," etc. 



FROM CHARLES DICKENS' MAGAZINE, " ALL THE YEAR ROUND." 

BOOK III. 

CHAPTER XV.— CONCLUSION OF BLACK SHEEP. 

THE ordinary business of the place and the occasion went 
on, intensified in interest to the spectators by the pres- 
ence of the murdered man's father, in the sensational charac- 
ter of a witness. Harriet's relation to the prisoner was not 
divined by the public, and so she passed unnoticed. 

Jim Swain was, of course, the chief witness, and he told 
his story with clearness and directness, though he was evi- 
dently and deeply affected by the sight of Harriet, whom his 
quick eye instantly recognised. Sbe took no notice ; she did 
not change her position, or raise her veil as the examination 
of the boy proceeded, as minute by minute she heard and felt 
the last chance, the last faint hope of escape, slip away, and 
the terrible certainty of doom become clearer and more immi- 
nent. She heard and saw the boy — whose story contained 
the destruction of hope and life, showed her the utter futility 
of all the plans they had concocted, of all the precautions 
they had taken ; showed her that while they had fenced them- 
selves from the danger without, the unsuspected ruin was close 
beside them, always near — wholly unmoved. It had come, it 
had happened ; all was over, it did not matter how. There 
was no room for anger, no power of surprise or curiosity left 
in her mind. As the golden locket was produced, and the 
identity of the portrait with that of the murdered man was 
■worn to, a kind of vision came to her. She saw the bright 
spring morning once more, and the lonely bridge ; she saw the 
river with the early sunlight upon it ; she saw herself leaning 
over the parapet and looking into the water, as the parcel she 
had carried thither with careful haste sank into the depth and 
was hidden. She saw herself returning homeward, the danger- 
ous link in the evidence destroyed, passing by the archway, 
where a boy lay, whom she had pitied, even then, in her own 
great and terrible anguish. If anything could be strange now, 
it would be strange to remember what he then had in his pos- 
session, to render all her precaution vain. But she could not 
feel it so, or think about it; all things were alike to her hence- 
forth, there was no strangeness or familiarity in them for ever- 
more. Occasionally, for a minute, the place she was in seemed 
to grow unreal to her, and to fade ; the next, she took up the 
full sense of the words which were being spoken, and every 
face in the crowd, every detail of the building, every accident 
of the scene, seemed to strike upon her brain through her 
eyes. She never looked at him, but she saw him distinctly ; 
she saw also the look with which Routh regarded bim. 

That look was murderous. As the boy's story made his 
motives evident, as it exposed the fallacious nature of the se- 
curity on which Routh had built, as it made him see how true 
had been Harriet's prevision, how wise her counsel — though 
he hated her all the more bitterly as the knowledge grew more 
and more irresistible — the murderous impulse rose to fury 
within him. Standing there a prisoner, helpless, and certain 
of condemnation, for he never had a doubt of that, the chain 
he had helped to forge by his counsel to Dallas was too strong 
to be broken ; he would have taken two more lives if he had 
had the power and the chance — the boy's, and that accursed 
woman's. Not his wife's, not Harriet's ; he knew now, he 
saw now, she had not brought him to' this. But the other, 
the other, who had tempted him and lured him ; who had de- 
feated him, ruined him, and escaped. He knew her shallow 
character and her cold heart, and his fierce, vindictive, pas- 
iionate, sensul nature was stirred by horrid pangs of fury and 
powerless hate as he thought of her — of the triumphant 
beauty which he had so coveted, of the wealth he had so 
nearly clutched — triumphant, and happy, and powerful still, 
while he— he — ! Already the bitterness and blackness of 
death were upon him. 

And the boy ! So powerful, even now, was the egotism of 
the man's nature, that he winced uuder the pain of the defeat 
the boy had inflicted upon him— winced under the defeat 
while he trembled at the destruction. He had kept him near 
him, under his hand, that if the need should arise he might 
use bim as an instrument for the ruin of George Dallas, and 
so had provided for his own ruin. The active hate and per- 
sistent plan of another could not have worked more surely 
against him than he had himself wrought, and the sense of 
the boy's instrumentality became unbearably degrading to 
him, wounding him whore ho was most vulnerable. 

Thus all black and evil passions raged in his heart ; and as 
his wife looked in his face, she read them there as in a printed 
book, and once again the feeling of last night came over her, 
of the strangeness of a sadden cessation to all this, and also 
something like a dreary satisfaction in the knowledge that it 
was within her power and his to bid it all cease —to have done 
with it. 



Looking at him, and thinking this, if the strange dream of 
her mind may be called thought, the curiosity of the crowd 
began to anger her a little. What was the dead man to them, 
the nameless stranger, and they should care for the discovery 
—that they should come here to see the agony of another 
man, destined, like the first, to die? The popular instinct 
filled her with loathing, but only momentarily ; she forgot to 
think of it the next minute, and the vagueness came again, 
the film and the dimness, and again the acute distinctness of 
sound, the intensity of vision. 

It was over at length. The prisoner was committed for 
trial. As he was removed with the celerity usual on such oc- 
casions, Harriet made a slight sign to the solicitor acting for 
Routh — a sign evidently preconcerted, for ho approached the 
magistrate, and addressed him in a low voice. The reply was 
favorable to his request, and he, in his turn, signed to Har- 
riet, who left her place and came to where he was standing. 
He placed her in the box, and she stood there firmly, having 
bowed to the magistrate, who addressed her : 

" You are the prisoner's wife ?" 

" I am." 

" You wish to speak to me ?" 

" 1 wish to ask your permission to see my husband before 
he is removed." 

" You may do so. Take care of the lady." 

This to one of the officials. The tone of the magistrate's 
reply to Harriet was compassionate, though he spoke briefly ; 
and he looked intently at her as she bowed again and turned 
meekly away. He has said, since then, that he never saw su- 
preme despair in any face before. 

" You have not much time," the policeman said, not un- 
kindly, who conducted her to the lock-up cell where Routh 
was. She made no answer, but went, and the door was locked 
behind her. He was sitting on a bench exactly in front of 
the door, and the moment sbe passed it her eyes met his. 
Fury and gloom were lowering upon his face ; he looked up 
sullenly at ber, but did not speak. She stood by the door, 
leaning against it, and said, iu alow tone : 

" I have but little time, they tell me. I am come to learn 
yoar will. It was agreed between us, once, that if the worst 
came, I should supply you with the means of disposing of 
your fate. I remembered that agreement, and I have brought, 
you this.'' 

She put her hand in her bosom, and took out of her dress 
a small phial. It contained prussic acid, and was sealed and 
stoppered with glass. 

He started and groaned, but did not yet speak. 

" The worst has come," she said. " 1 do not say you ought 
not to face it out, still I only do as you once desired me to 
do in such a case. The decision is with yourself. This is my 
only opportunity of obeying you, and I do so." 

" The worst has come," be said, in a hoarse voice, not in 
the least like his own ; " you are sure the wor3t has come ? 
He said it was a bad case, a very bad case. Yes, the worst 
has come." 

Her hand was stretched out, the phial in it. He made no 
attempt to take it from her. She held it still, and spoke 
again : 

" I have very little time. You will be searched presently, 
they tell me, and this will be found, probably. I have obeyed 
you to the last, as from the beginning." 

" There's no chance — you are quite sure there is no 
chance ?" 

" I am quite sure there i3 no chance. I have always known, 
if this happened, there could be no chance." 

He muttered something under his breath. 

" I do not hear you," she said. " You are reproaching me, 
I dare say, but it is not worth while. If you make uo use of 
this, you will have time to reproach me as much as you like. 
If you do make use of it, reproach is past, with time and life. 
Have you decided?" 

" No," he said ; " give it to me. If I use it, it must be very 
soon — if not, never." 

Sbe laid the phial on the bench beside him, and he took it 
up, and placed it in his breast pocket. Sbe did not touch 
him, but when she had laid the phial down, stepped back, and 
leaned against the door. 

" Is there anything you want to know — anythiug I can tell 
you V she asked. " Again, my time is very short." 

" i\o," he said ; " it 1 make up my mina to go through this 
I shall know all I want ; if I dou't, I need not kuow any- 
thing.' ' 

"Just so," she said quietly. He looked on the ground, she 

looked at him. 

" Harriet," he said, suddenly, " I am sorry, I " 

" Hush," she said, flushing scarlet for one brief moment, 

and putting out her hand. " No more. All is over, and dono 

with. The past is dead, end I am dead with it. Not a word 

of me." 

" But if — if — " he touched his coat-pocket. " I must first 
know what is to become of you." 

" Must yon?" she said, and the faintest possible alteration 
came in her voice — a little, little softening, and a slight touch 
of surprise. " I think you might have known that I shall live 
until I know that you are no longer living." 



" Sorry to interrupt you, ma'am," said the policeman who 
had brought Harriet to the cell, unlocking the door with sharp 
suddenness — "very sorry, I'm sure ; but " 

" I am quite ready," said Harriet ; and, as Routh started 
up, she turned, and was outside the door in an instant. Two 
policemen were in the passage ; at the door through which 
she had been led from the court, Routh's solicitor was stand- 
ing. He took her arm in his, and brought her away through 
a private entrance. They did not speak till she was in the 
street, where she saw, at a little distance, a crowd collected to 
watch the exit of the prison van. He called a cab. 

"Where to?" 

" My house." 

" I will go with you." 

" No, thank you. Indeed, I would rather go alone." 

" I shall see you this evening." 
She bent her head in reply. 

When she was seated in the cab she put out her hand to 
him, and as she leaned forward he saw her awful face. 

" God help you, Mrs. Routh," he snid, with intense pity. 
Then she said, in a clear low voice, whoso tone he remembers^ 
as he remembers the face, these words : 

" There is uo God. If there were, there could be no such 
men as he, and no such woman as I." 

When she was a short distance from the police-court, and 
beyond the solicitor's sight, she called to the driver from the 
window that sbe had changed her purpose, and desired to be 
set down at St. Paul's Churchyard. 

The arrival of the prison van at Newgate excited the usual 
sensation which it produces among the public who congre- 
gate in the neighborhood of the prison to see it discharge its 
wretched contents. The majority of this crowd were, as 
usual, of the dangerous classes, and it would have afforded 
matter of speculation to the curious in such things to look at 
their faces aud calculate, according to the indices there given, 
how many of the number would one day take a personal part 
in a spectacle similar to that at which they were gaziug with 
curiosity, which renewed itself daily. On this occasion the 
sentiment prevalent on the outside of the grim fortress of 
crime was shared iu an unusual degree by the officials, and 
general, not criminal, inhabitants. Not that a supposed mur- 
derer's arrival was any novelty at Newgate, but that the sup- 
posed murderer iu the present instance was not of the class 
among which society ordinarily recruits its murderers, and the 
circumstances both of the crime aud its discovery were ex- 
ceptional. Thus, when the gate by which the prisoners were 
to be admitted unclosed, the yard was full of spectators. 

Four prisoners were committed that day : a burglar and his 
assistant; a merchant's clerk who haoV managed a forgery so 
remarkably cleverly that it deeded only not to ha<e- been 
found out, to have been a stroke of brilliant genius ; and 
Stewart" Routh. The door was opened, the group of specta- 
tors gathered round. First the burglar, a wiry little man t 
more like the tailor of real life than the conventional hero of 
the center-bit and the jemmy. Next, his assistant, an indivi- 
dual of jovial appearance, tempered with responsibility, like 
a popular president ot school feasts, or the leader of a village 
choir. Thirdly, the forger, remarkable for nothing in bis ap- 
pearance except its abjectness of fright and bewilderment. 
These had emerged from the darksome recesses of the hide- 
ous caravan, the first and no slight instalment of their punish- 
ment, and had been received with comparative indifference. 
A passing glance was all that was accorded to them by the 
spectators waiting the appearance of the "gentleman" who 
was in such very serious ■ trouble." 

But the gentleman did not follow his temporary associates, 
though the policeman in attendance held the door open, and 
told him to " come on." Then he stepped into the van and 
up to the compartment in which Routh had been placed. Af- 
ter an elapse of a full minute he emerged, aud addressing the 
lookers-on generally, he said : 

" There's something queer the matter with him, and I 
think he's dead !" 

A stir and confusion among the crowd, and the governor 
called for. A matter of fact turnkey advances, saying, in a 
business-like tone : 

" Hani him out, and let's see." 

They do haul him out, and they do see. nis face is rather 
bluish in color, and his eyes are open, but his hands are 
clenched, and his tongue is rigid. And he is quite dead. Ho 
there is a great sensation around the prison, the senseless 
figure is carried into the yard, and the gate is promptly shut, 
the rumor spreads through the crowd, trying to find chinks 
which do not exist, and to hear sounds inaudible, that the 
" murder " case is disposed of, the prisoner having tried, con- 
demned and executed himself. And, though the incideut is 
highly sensational, the general feeling is disappointment. 

A woman, plainly dressed and closely veiled , who has been 
lingering about the street for some time, and was there when 
the van arrived, has seen the figure lifted from the van, and 
has beard the rumor. But she waits a little longer, until a 
policeman comes out of a side entrance, and while some eager 
inquirers, chiefly women, question him, and he tells them it is 
quite true, the man committed for trial for the riverside mur- 



The Californian. 



der is really dead, she stands by and listens. Then she draws 
her shawl closely round her, and shivers, and goes away. 
After she has taken a few steps, she falters and sways a little, 
but she leans against the wall, her hands pressed upon her 
breast, quietly, attracting no attention, until she has regained 
her composure, nud her breath, and then goes on, along the 
street, and so out into Holborn. 

" She has not been seen or heard of, at his chambers or at 
home," said Mr. Carrulhers to Mr. Felton, late that evening. 
"Nothing is known of her. They say she ha3 no friends ; I 
could not find out from the servants that she has a single ac- 
quaintance even to whose house she could have gone." 

Mr. Felton was infinitely distressed by this news which Mr. 
Carruthers, whose active benevolence, guided by the judg- 
ment of others, knew no bounds, brought to his brother-in- 
law, who was at length exhausted, and unable to rise. They 
had heard early in the afternoon of the death of Routh, and 
had all at once been roused to the warmest compassion for 
Harriet. Clare, having left the unconscious Mrs. Carruthers 
tranquilly asleep, had gone to Mr. Felton's lodgings, and was 
there when her uncle came in with his report. 
" Laura has no suspicion ?" asked Mr. Felton. 

" Not the slightest. She has no notion that you and George 
are not still in Paris. I must say Clare is an admirable girl 
to keep a secret and play a part." 

Clare blushed a little at her uncle's praise. 

" What is to be done now about this unfortunate woman ? 
She must be found. Apart from every other consideration, 
George would be infinitely distressed if any harm came to 
her." 

" I really don't know," said Mr. Carruthers. " There seems 

to be no clue to her probable movements, and Come in." 

This was in answer to a knock at the door. 
Jim Swain came in, his face full of eagerness : 
" Have you found her, sir ? Is she at home ? Does she 
know ?" 

" No, Jim," said Mr. Felton, " she's not at home, and no 
one knows anything of her." 

" Sir," exclaimed Jim — " miss, I'm sure she's somewheres 
about the prison. Has any one thought of lookin' for her 
there ? She'd go there, sir aud miss — she'd go there. Take 
me with you, and let us go and look for her. I daren't go 
alone ; she wouldn't listen to me, she wouldn't look at me ; 
but I'm sure she's there." 

" Uncle," said Clare, earnestly, " I am sure he's right — I 
feel sure he is right. Pray go : a toke one of the servants and 
him. The carriage's waiting Mr me ; take it and gV 

. Carruthers did as she desired. It was wonderful to see 
the change that had come over him with the awakening of his 
better nature. He had always been energetic, and now he 
forgot to be pompous and self-engrossed. 

The streets in the dismal quarter of the prison were com- 
paratively silent and empty when Mr. Carruthers called to the 
coachman to stop, and got out of the carriage, Jim descending 
from the box, aud they began their dismal search. It was not 
prolonged or difficult. 

They found her sitting on the ground, supported by the pris- 
on wall, which she had contrived to reach by creeping under 
the strong barrier of iron spikes which protects the prison on 
the side which turns its external wall to the street. There, 
fenced in by the terrible bristling barrier, she lay, in an angle 
where there was little resort of footsteps aud but dim light — 
a corner in which the tired wayfarer might rest, unquestioned, 
for a little, by either the policeman or the passer-by. And 
no more tired wayfarer had ever sat down to rest, even in the 
pitiless London streets, than the woman who had wandered 
about until the friendly night had fallen, and had then come 
there to die, and have done with it. 

They took her to her own home, and when they removed 
her shawl a slip of paper, on which George Dallas' name was 
written, was found pinned to the front of her dress. It con- 
tained these words : 

" The boy's story is true. I did not keep the diamonds 
taken out of the studs. You sold them when you sold your 
mother's. I was always sorry you ever knew us. 

" H. Routh." 

^ 1 » ■ ' J '*v^^BjK "'' wW 3 '*'' If"' 1 

George Dallas is in New York with Mr. Felton, who is 
winding up all his affairs, with a view to a permanent residence 
in England. Jim Swain, whose education includes the art of 
writing now, is attached to the personal service of Mr. Dallas, 
who is understood to be his uncle's heir. 

Miss Carruthtrs is at Poynings, not to be tempted by Lon- 
don aud its pleasures ; but the absence of the young and beau- 
tiful heiress is not so deeply deplored by " society " as it 
would be, were it not generally known that she is engaged. 
[concluded.] 

As an instance of the rapid growth of some of our western 
cities it may be stated that St. Joseph, Missouri, gained in 
population, in 18G6, over 6,000, or more than 25 per cent. 

Why are good husbands like dough? Because women 
need them. 



JAPAN SOCIETY. 

A L.L lustres fade, all types decay, 

That Time lias strength to touch or tarnish 
Japan receives itself to-day 

A novel kind of varnish. 
All Atia moves ; in far Thibet 

A fear of change perturbs the Lama ; 
You'll hear the railway whistle yet 

Arousing Yokohama ! 

Methinks it were a theme for song, 

This spread of European knowledge ; 
Gasometers adorn Hong Kong, 

Calcutta keeps a college. 
Pale Ale and Cavendish maintain 

Our hold among the opium smokers ; 
Through Java jungles runs the train, 

With Dutchmen for the stokers. 

The East is doomed ; Romance is dead, 

Or surely on the point of dying : 
The travelers' books our boyhood read 

Would now be reckoned lying. 
Our young illusions vanish fast ; 

They're obselote — effete — archaic ; 
The hour has come that sees at last 

The Orient prosaic ! 

The Brother of the Sun and Moon 

Has long renounced his claims excessive ; 
And now we find a new Tycoon, 

WhV) styles himself " progressive," 
Where once the Dutch alone could trade, 

With many a sore humiliation, 
The flags are flauntingly displayed 

Of every western nation. 

The steamers in the harbors smoke ; 

The Titan-Steam begins its functions ; 
There'll be a market soon for coke, 

When jnnks give way to junctions ! 
The oriental little boys, 

Who now survey those startling vapors, 
Will learn to shout, with hideous noise, 

The names of morning papers! 

The East is dyin? : live the East ! 

With hope we watch its transformation ; 
Our European life, at least, 

Is better than stagnation. 
The cycles of Cathay are run ; 

Begins the new, the nobler movement — 
I'm half ashamed of making fuu 

Of Japanese improvement! 

Fai.se Hair. — The London Lancet has been giviBg a series 
of articles upon the bad effects which results from the use of false 
hair. In its last article it says : " The fact that a very large 
amount of the artificial hair is originally studded over with the egg 
bags of the common pediculus, is one of the best evidences that 
the individuals from whom the hair has been obtained were stran- 
gers to habits of cleanliness. In much of the hair that comes 
into the English market, especially that of a lighter shade, the 
distal half of the shaft is dotted over with what are generally 
regarded as " nits." These are of two kinds ; the one at- 
tached laterally — ova remains ; and a second form which, sur- 
rounding the hair, is difficult to detach (more difficult than the 
true " nits"), and may be found on the hair that has been pre- 
pared aud cleansed fur sale. The latter is nothing more nor 
less than a collection of vegetable sporules or cells similar to 
those which are found in the various forms of ringworm. 
They are not destroyed by many of the processes to which the 
hair is subjected in its preparation ; and there can be no doubt 
that, when placed upon a favorable soil, they would speedily 
grow and produce serious diseases. Fortunately the scalp of 
adults does not form a favorable nidus for these parasitic 
germs, but in some instances of scurfy disease of the scalp there 
is reason to think they are the true cause of mischief. In the 
case of the young, it cannot be doubted that ringworm would 
be produced by their growth ; and the fact is certain that many 
ladies carry about with them in their " chignons " the seeds 
of " ringworm " — au intractable malady. There is also a 
novel species of false hair in the market ; it is called " church- 
yard hair," and consists not only of the shafts but the roots 
also, and hence must have been pulled from the scalp of the 
dead ! — a horrible idea, and one that should certainly make 
ladies revolt against the present absurd and uncleanly fashion. 

A Joke that Paid. — Count Bismarck recently presented a 
faithful but poor secretary with a portfolio bound like a book, 
in which were deposited five thousand thalers. On meeting 
his secretary next day, the Count asked him if he had perused 
the volume. " Yes, your highness," said the secretary, " and 
I am so captivated by its contents that I am waiting the ap- 
pearance of the second volume with feelings of the greatest 
interest," The Count smiled, but said nothing. A few days 
afterward the secretary received a second portfolio, bound and 
filled like the first, and on the title page of which was the sen- 
tence : " This work is complete in two volumes." 

At a morning performance, in Paris, of " the Pirates of the 
Savannah," (the piece in which the Menken appears,) the 
large sum of nine thousand, four hundred francs was taken. 

Prejudices are like rats, and a man's mind like a trap ; 
they get in easily, and then perhaps can't get out at all. 



A VERY PLEASANT EVENING. 

YOU may not be surprised if I call upon you to prepare 
for your domestic pleasures with a little suffering; 
nor, when I tell you what such pleasures are, must you ex- 
claim against them as absurd. Having the sanction of our 
forefathers, they are what is fashionable now, and consequently 
they are what is fit. I propose, then, that you should give for 
the entertainment of your friends an evening party ; and as 
this is a scene in which young ladie3 prominently figure, I will, 
if you please, on this occasion, pay particular attention to your 
daughter. 

0, mystery of prepaiation I — Pardon, sir. You err if you 
suppose me to insinuate that ladies are more careful over per- 
sonal adornment than the gentlemen. Man at his grimmest 
is as vain as woman, even when he stalks about bearded and 
battle-axed. This is the mystery of preparation in your daugh- 
ter's case ; how does she breathe ? You have prepared her 
from childhood for the part she is to play to-night, by training 
her form into the only shape which can be looked on with 
complacency in any ball-room. A machine called stays, intro- 
duced long since into England by the Normans, has had her 
in its grip from early girlhood. She has become pale, and — 
only the least bit — liable to be blue about the nose and fin- 
gers. Stays are an excellent contrivance ; they give a material 
support to the old cause, unhealthiness at home. This is the 
secret of their excellence. A woman's ribs are narrow at the 
top, and as they approach the waist they widen, to allow room 
for the lungs to play within them. If you can prevent the 
ribs from widening, you can prevent the lungs from plajing, 
which they have no right to do, and make them work. Thia 
you accomplish by the agency of stays. It fortunately hap- 
pens that these lungs have work to do — the putting of the 
breath of life into the blood— which they are unable to do 
properly when cramped for space ; it becomes about as diffi- 
cult to them as it would be to you to play the trombone in a 
in a china-closet. By this compression of the chest ladie3 are 
made nervous, and become unfit for much exertion. 

Well, your daughter comes down stairs dressed, with a bou- 
quet, at a time when the dull seeker of health and strength 
would have her go up stairs with a bed-candlestick. Your 
guests arrive. Young ladies thinly clad, and packed in car- 
riages, emerge half stifled, put a cold foot protected by a filmy 
shoe, upon the pavement, and run, shivering, into your house. 
Well, sir, we'll warm them presently. 

But suffer me to dance a polka with your daughter. Frail, 
elegant creature that she is I A glass of wine — macaroon — 
good. That was a delightful dance ; now let us promenade. 
The room is close ; a glass of wine, an ice, and let us go to 
the delicious draught in the conservatory, or by that door. Is 
it not beautiful ? The next quadrille — I look slily at my 
watch, and Auber's grim chorus rumbles within me. " Mid- 
night ! " Another dance. How fond she seems to be of 
macaroons. Supper. My dear sir, I will take good caro of 
your daughter. One sandwich. Champagne. Blancmange. 
Bonbon. Champagne. Sherry. Champagne. Tipsy-cake. 
Brandy cherries. Glass of wine. A macaroon. Trifle. Jelly. 
Champagne. Custard. Macaroon. The ladies are being cared 
for. Yes ; now in their absence we will drink their health — 
their and our bad healths. This is the happiest moment of 
our lives ; at two in the morning, with a dose of indigestion 
in our stomach, and three hours more to come before we get 
to bed. You, my dear sir, hope that, on many occasions like 
the present, you may see your friends around you, looking as 
glassy-eyed as you have made them to look now. We will re- 
join the ladies. 

Nothing but champagne could have enabled us to keep up 
the evening so well. We were getting weary before supper 

but we have had some wine, have dug the spurs into our 

sides, and on we go again. At length even the bottle stimu- 
lates our worn out company no more, and then we separate. 
Good night, dear sir ; we have spent a very pleasant evening 
under your roof. 

To-morrow, when you depart from a late breakfast, having 
seen your daughter's face and her dim and heavy eye, know- 
ing that your wife is bilious, and that your son has just gone 
out for soda water, you will feel yourself to be a father who 
has done his duty, a man who has paid something on account 
of his great debt to civilized society. 

A short time ago, at Toledo, Ohio, a cattle-dealer received 
pay for a steer, which had been sold to a butcher, and rolling 
the greenbacks into a small wad, put them into bis tobacco 
box. Shortly after, he extricated, as he thought, a portion of 
the tobacco, but, with air his mastication, could expectorate 
none of the savoiy juices, and finally took his quid out of his 
mouth to look at it, when he found he had been chewing his 
roll of greenbacks. He stood aghast for a moment, and then 
burst out : " Coufouud the luck ! a whole steer at one chew 1" 

Ceremony was always the companion of weak minds ; it is 
a plant that will never grow in a strong soil. 
; Innocence is no security against temptation ; it is exactly 
what temptation conquers. 



4 



The Californian. 



LITERARY GOSSIP AND GLEANINGS. 

THE GORILLA CONTROVERSY. 

THE hostility which M. Da Chaillu has encountered at the 
hands of divers English savants and naturalists may, 
perhaps, be in part accounted for by the fact that he com- 
menced his career a3 " a young and illiterate trader " — it is 
thus that Mr. W. Winwood Reade characterizes him — and 
does not, therefore, belong to the learned guild that is. ac- 
customed to claim exclusive authority in all matters connected 
with the natural sciences. At any rate, we prefer to attribute 
it to thi3 source than to the circumstance that the now famous 
African explorer, is an American by birth, and a Frenchman 
by descent. 

But whatever may be the cause of the animosity, there can 
be no doubt whatever of its existence. " The position of an 
explorer of unknown countries in England," 6ays Du Chaillu 
pathetically, " is peculiar, and very difficult. If he returns 
home with nothing new or striking to relate he is voted a bore, 
and his book has no chance of being read ; if he has some 
wonders to unfold, connected with Geography, the Natives, 
or Natural History, the fate of Abyssinian Bruce too often 
awaits him, his narrative being held up to scorn and ridicule 
as a tissue of figments." 

In a recent number of the Galaxy W. Winwood Reade, 
the naturalist, has an article entitled " The Facts About M. 
Du. Chaillu," in which he declares that wishing to settle the 
question of the veracity of Du Chaillu, he determined to go 
all the way to the gorilla country for the purpose of investigat- 
ing it. We fear, from the prevailing spirit of the article, that 
Mr. Reade made his journey not so much with the purpose of 
" investigation," as of discovering proofs to support a conclu- 
sion already formed. " It seems to be a point of honor in the 
British naturalist," says a writer in Wilkes' Spirit of the 
Times, " to doubt M. Du Chaillu. That traveler is, we be- 
lieve, a native of New Orleans, born of French parents, and 
whether it is in his capacity of American or Frenchman that 
he so disgusts the British mind, or that it is by those aristo- 
crats of science, the members of the geographical and ethno- 
logical societies, considered a piece of presumption in ' a 
young and illiterate trader ' to discover new apes, we know 
not ; but certainly ever since the appearance of M. Du 
Chaillu's first book he has been like the red rag to our cousin 
Bull, exciting a degree of rage wholly unintelligible to com- 
mon humanity. Among the facts to be ascertained were 
these : Did M. Du Chaillu travel eight thousand miles on 
foot ? Did the bald-headed ape build an umbrella-shaped 
nest, and sit under it when it rained? Was the young gorilla 
untamable? Had M. Du Chaillu ever killed a gorilla ? Had 
a gorilla ever killed one of M. Du Chaillu's hunters ? Did the 
gorilla attack its enemies in an erect posture, beatiiif its 
breast? Now, one would suppose that after all the trouble 
and expense of a voyage to the gorilla country for the pur- 
pose of investigating these facts, that Mr. Reade would have 
investigated them. What did he do ? He tells us that he 
went first to the missionaries. These worthy men, whose 
business was with the negroes, and not the apes, could not be 
supposed to know much about them. They, however, agreed 
with M. Du Chaillu, that the gorilla attacked without provo- 
cation, and always on his hind feet. But lest M. Du Chaillu's 
reputation should be benefitted by this opinion, for it was 
probably nothing more, Mr. Reade declares that M. Du Chaillu 
learned it from the missionaries. Leaving the missionaries, 
Mr. Reade goes to the natives, with whom he communicates 
through an interpreter, a serious obstacle, one would imagine, 
to the pursuit of exact knowledge. In the course of a din- 
ner with a black king, Quengueza by name, that monarch in- 
forms him that Paulo (It Du Chaillu) had been in the habit 
of shooting gorillas with him in the bush. His next inquiry 
was of a certain Lady Mary, ' who spoke slowly and thought- 
fully.' This thoughtful person denied the truth of the king's 
statement, and rebuked him, upon which his majesty ate his 
words in a manner wholly ignoble and unkingly, and denied 
that Paulo had shot gorillas. And this loose talk of two 
naked savages, neither of whom could understand the ex- 
amining counsel, Mr. Reade calls an investigation. Then he 
calls the hunters of the town together, and proposes to go 
with them to shoot gorillas. ' Who ever heard of a white 
man doing that ?' said they. ' Why not do as Paulo did, buy 
the gorillas of us for powder, cloth, and tobacco ?' Mr. Reade 
did not understand that these cunning savages wished to keep 
white men from their huuting grounds. Then he asked other 
hunters what Paulo shot. The reply was, ' squirrels, birds, 
and small monkeys.' Of course he did, for we saw many of 
these animals in his collection, and no doubt they were more 
plentiful thau gorillas, which do not sit on every tree. But 
here is no evidence that Mr. Du Chaillu did not kill a gorilla. 
Why did not Mr. Reade call the only good witness, the beast 
itseir? Why did he not at least try to shoot one, to ascertain 
whether the thing was practicable and safe. He styles himself 
a tourist, and, as all Englishmen are by their birthright sports 
men, he should have decided the question face to face with 
tht, great ape. Mr. Reade says that Mr. Du Chaillu's state- 
ments that he traveled eight thousand miles on foot, is mon- 



strous. He admits that the journeys made by Mr. Du Chaillu 
were ' creditable to a young and illiterate trader,' though 
why an illiterate trader, who by Mr. Reade's own account was 
said by the natives 'to walk the bush well,' could not travel 
as well as a college graduate, does not appear. He next in- 
forms us that the umbrella shaped nest is a myth, though 
whether he learned this fact from the thoughtful Lady Mary 
or the hospitable though irresolute Quengueza he does not 
say. In this, as in many other instances, we have a mere de- 
nial. Let us be thankful for that much. ' The public is not 
to be bamboozled any more.' Mr. Reade says that the young 
gorilla which he saw was not ferocious. There may be differ- 
ences in gorillas as in Englishmen. Some of the latter are 
like Sir Roderick Murchison, kind and generous to young au- 
thors and naturalists, while others fiercely accuse them of lit- 
erary crimes. Mr. Reade asserts, with the graceful modesty 
so characteristic of his uation, and which makes them beloved 
throughout the world, that no hunter has beeu killed by a 
gorilla within the memoiy of man, in any part of the country 
visited by himself or M. Du Chaillu. It is, after ail, a ques- 
tion of evidence between himself and M. Du Chaillu, and we 
think the rules of evidence are in favor of him who saw, 
rather than of him who saw not ; other things being equal, 
we must prefer the positive to the negative. Mr. Reade 
says, fiually, that this is a question of science, not of senti- 
ment. From the manner in which he and other Englishmen 
have discussed it, we should have thought it a question of 
nationality." 

THE GORILLA AT HOME. 

The most uncompromising champions of M. Du Chaillu, 
must, however, admit that in his last volume, " A Journey to 
Ashango-Laud," he has taken back, or considerably modi- 
fied several of the more sensational statements made in the 
" Adveutures in Equatorial Africa." He admits it is possible 
to capture the adult female gorilla alive ; also, that the gorilla 
is gregarious, instead of living in pairs, and the whole repre- 
sentation of the creature as it figures in the present work, is 
very much toned down. Here is a description of three of 
them captured by the negroes : 

" The natives of all the neighboring country were now so well 
aware that I wanted live gorillas, and was willing to give a 
high price for them, that many were stimulated to search with 
great perseverance ; the good effects of this were soon made 
evident. 

One day, as I was quietly dining with Captain Holder, of 
the Cambria (a vessel just arrived from England), one of my 
men came in with the startling news that three live gorillas 
had been brought, one of them full-grown. I had not long to 
wait ; in they came. First, a very large adult female, bound 
hand and foot ; then her female child, screaming terribly ; and 
lastly, a vigorous young male, also tightly bound. The female 
had been ingeniously secured by the negroes to a strong stick, 
the wrists bound to the upper part, and the ankles to the 
lower, so that she could not reach to tear the cords with her 
teeth. It was dark, and the scene was one so wild and 
strange that I shall never forget it. The fiendish counte- 
nances of the Calibanish trio, one of them distorted by pain 
(for the mother gorilla was severely wounded), were lit up by 
the ruddy glare of native torches. The thought struck me, 
what would I not give to have the group in Loudon for a few 
days ! 

The young male I secured by a chain which I had in readi- 
ness, aud gave him henceforth the name of Tom. We untied 
his hands and feet ; to show his gratitude for this act of kind- 
ness he immediately made a rush at me, screaming with all his 
might ; happily the chain was made fast, and I took care after- 
ward to keep out of his way. The old mother gorilla was in 
unfortunate plight. She had an arm broken and a wound in 
the chest, besides being dreadfully beaten on the head. She 
groaned and roared, many times during the night, probably 
from pain. 

I noticed next day, and on many occasions, that the vigor- 
ous young male, whenever he made a rush at any one and 
missed his aim, immediately ran back. This corresponds with 
what is known of the habits of the large males in their native 
woods ; when attacked they make a ferocious rush at their 
enemy, break an arm or tear his bowels open, and then beat 
a retreat, leaving their victim to shift for himself. 

The wounded female died in the course of the next day ; 
her moaning were more frequent in the morning, and thay 
gradually became weaker as her life ebbed out. Her death 
was like that of a human being, and affected me more than I 
could have thought possible. Her child clung to her to the 
last, and tried to obtain milk from her breast after she was 
dead. I photographed them both when the young one was 
resting in its dead mother's lap. I kept the young one alive 
for three days after its mother's death. I feed it on goat's 
milk, for it was too young to cut berries. It died the fourth 
day, having taken an unconquerable dislike to the milk. It 
had, I think, begun to know me a little. As to the male, I 
made at least a dozen attempts to photograph the irascible 
little demon, but all in vain. The pointing of the camera to- 
ward him threw him into a perfect rage, and I was almost pro- 
voked to give him a sound thrashing. The day after, however, 
I succeeded with him, taking two views, and not very perfect, 
but sufficient for my object. 

I must now relate how these three a:;iinals were caught, 
premising that the capture of the female was the first instance 
that had come to my knowledge of an adult gorilla being taken 
alive. The place where they were found was on the left bank 



of the Fernand Vaz, about thirty miles above my village. At 
this part a narrow promontory projects into the river. It was 
the place where I had intended to take the noted traveler, 
Captain Burton, to show him a live gorilla, if he hod paid me 
a visit, as I had expected, for I had written to invite h'tn while 
he was on a tour from his Consulate at Fernando Po to sev- 
eral points on the West African coast. 

A woman belonging to a neighboring village had told her 
people that she had seen two squads of female gorillas, some 
of them accompanied by their young ones, in her plantain 
field. The men resolved to go in chase of them ; so they 
armed themselves with guns, axes and spears, and sallied 
forth. The situation was very favorable for the hunters ; 
they formed a line across the narrow strip of land and pressed 
forward, driving the animals to the edge of the water. When 
they came in sight of them, they made all the noise in their 
power, and thus bewildered the gorillas, who were shot or 
beaten down in their endeavors to escape. There were eight 
adult females altogether, but not a single male. The negroes 
thought the males were in the adjoining woods, having proba- 
bly been frightened away by the noise." 

AMERICAN AND ENGLISH LITERARY PAPERS. 

The New York Herald thus remarks upon the difference 
between European and American periodicals : " In Europe 
men give up their lives to one definite line of labor, and ex- 
pect that the solar system will tumble to pieces when tbey 
deviate a hair's breadth to the right or left of that line 
Every little necessary pursuit of civilization is some one's 
specialty. We see nowhere a better illustration of the differ- 
ence than in the periodicals of the two emihsphere9. Lon- 
don publications are special. It is Punch's vocation to do 
the fun. It has nothing to do with any subject except as it 
can draw a laugh from it. If it canuot keep on the broad 
grin it must maintain silence. The London Illustrated News 
has no business with any event or fact under the sun unless 
there are pictures in it. All that lies in the realm of the pic- 
torial artist is fair game ; beyond that there is nothing. Other 
sheets are equally devoted to athletic sports ; others again to 
fiction, and still others to political discussion. In the pages 
of a single New York periodical we will find all these at once. 
In Harper's Weekly we find current events pictured with apt 
and admirable pencil, and on the same page the broad grin of 
homely humor — the lash of political satire, sometimes rather 
savage, perhaps — excellent fiction, and often poems of a high 
order of merit. While good fun is thus shown to be possible, 
attempts to establish funny papers here always fail. Bonner's 
irrepressible Li-dyer has a range but little less extensive than 
Harper's Weekly. It also supplies its readers with constant 
novelty in fiction, with well written essays on various topics, 
and, having due regard to the spice of life, with wit, humor 
and poesy. 

These journals fill the sphere that iu Europe would be 
taken up by half a dozen sheets, each conducted on different 
plans. Undoubtedly in the saUfer of fii»>' -iking difference 
between the Old World and the-N'ew on this point of spa?i<)l|-t. 
there are notable advantages and disadvatages on both sides ; 
yet we cannot but regard the American peculiarity as the in- 
dication of a fuller aud more satisfactory development of the 
human intellect." 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Charles Henry Webb, the founder of The Californian, has 
determined to renounce verse-writing — at least, such would 
seem to be the fair inference from the following screed of "ad- 
vice " from his pen, which we clip from the New York 

Weekly Review : 

"The world is rife with nobler thought 
Than trembles on the tongue; 
The world is full of melody, 

(JnwHtten and unsung. 
The music of a inarch is sweet — 

Kut action is sublime ; 
And each may live a nobler verse 
Than e'er was told iu rhyme. 

Sweep from my sight these foolish books, 

They vex my weary brain, 
And I w ill sit at Nature's feet — 

Her open page the plain — 
And read a pleasant roundelay 

In every blade that grows ; 
A I vi ic in" the lily's leaf, 

An epic in the rose ! 

Let (inklings of the tongue or pen 

To love-nick girls belong — 
The music of a well speut life 

If sweeter fur than song. 
It likes me not, this waste of words — 

Our world were not so dead, 
If maids and men would cease to write, 

And live their veree instead ! " 

The sentimental and pedantic style of poetry is cleverly 
parodied, in the following verses, from " Crinkshank'a Omni- 
bus." They exemplify the science of horticulture, and pur- 
port to be the work of a Dr. Bulgardo. L.S.D., Treasurer of 
several Learned Societies, and Professor of Asparagus at the 
University of Battersea. Horticulture i3 illustrated in lines 
" To Molly with a basket of fruit and vegetables : " 
•' Nav ! say not ehrivell'd— 'tis despair 
Has thus subdued them, for they see 
That in themselves, however fair, 

They'll ne'er be reliali'd, love, like thee ! 
A deeper blush the raspberry points, 

Pale is the ruddy beetroot s lip ; 
And e'en the red-cheek 'd apple faints, 

As though it snfl'er'd from the pip. 
Severely frown the hakiug pears ; 

The artichoke's bold crest is down ; 
The awe-stmck medlar wildly stares 

To see thy cheek a swarthier brown. 
The icy cucuniher is hot. 

The 'freckled cauliflower wan ; 
The mushroom has no longer got 

A single leg to stand upon ! 
See how the rich, round -shoulder' d figs 

Bow to thy figure's graceful swell ; 
The sobbing orange bursts its nigs 
To And thee sush a uonpureil ! " 



The California!!. 



5 



[For tlie Californian.] 
DIGNITY. 

BY PRENTICE. 

I AM an admiref of dignity. I admire it in the judge upon 
the bench, the divine in the pulpit, the physician as he 
looks at your tongue or scratches a prescription for your ben- 
efit, of most abdominal, revolutionary tendencies. 

Bnt such people do not own all the dignity in the world. 
By no means. Policemen have it. View two of them as they 
escort a drunken man to the station house. Dignity settles 
itself in great masses on their faces on such occasions. It is 
their right to be dignified. It is their only refuge from an *n- 
appreciative world which knows nothing of the study, training 
and experience required properly to conduct a howling inebri- 
ate to the station house. 

Dignity is an inseparable adjunct to steamboat clerks. I 
have often watched these beings in awe and admiration aa they 
dispensed tickets to a crowd of struggling wretches. They 
are superior beings. Nature has endowed them with the ex- 
traordinary faculty of selling tickets. The gift commands our 
respect. Dignity was tacked to it like a sort of massive 
iron network, grand to behold and impossible to enter. And 
yet there are people every day who have the temerity to ask 
unnecessary questions of these berth and passage vending 
deities instead of applying to the deck hands ! But well do 
they know how to administer just and merited retribution. A 
sea sick girl is a spectacle of wo. But a sea sick girl is a pic- 
ture of cheerfulness compared to the man who creeps crushed 
and withered from the mouth of the steamboat clerk's den 
after asking some foolish question relative to the route. 

I have for sometime been trying to determine which one 
sustained the greatest load of dignity, the hotel clerk or the. 
bar keeper. Being often under the same roof, there ensues 
a tremendous contest for supremacy of dignity between them. 
I know of bar keepers so resplendent with dignity that in 
their presence I want to go down on my knees and pray. He 
would be perfect were he not just a trifle soured at the lack 
of appreciation displayed toward him by a selfish, grovelling 
world. What know they of the care, the unremitting midnight 
study of years, the oil consumed, the skill shown in the nice 
adjustment of sugar to water, of sugar and water to brandyt 
of brandy sugar and water to ice, of these last four to lemon 
peel, of all mainpulated with unearthly dexterity, of the nec- 
essary combination of orgeat, absynthe, wormwood or other 
powerful tonic required in the preparation of a brandy smash- 
How many years of practice were consumed ere that fluid 
could be slung so wonderfully Irotn one glass to the other. 
Think you a lawyer or a physician could wipe those tumblers 
'jfi beautifully bright and clean? Have you ever thought of 
the figure some mitred prelate would make behind that bar 
endeavoring to serve twenty Americans calling at once for 
every variety of stimulant, from simple pop or " whisky 
straight," up to the most complicated and mysterious vinous 
and alcoholic combinations ? Has not a man a right to be 
dignified, who, in such emergency, can keep bottles, glasses, 
spoons, lemons, sugar, ice, straws and strawberries, flying for a 
minute in apparent chaos above, beneath and arouud him and 
while you are stupidly looking on, momentarily expecting the 
grand smash, Lo ! your punch is before you, it is inside of you 
there is your change, the bar is cleared, it is wiped, the glasses 
are clean and in their place and the emissary of Bacchus 
stands before you erect, grand, quiet, confident, smiling! And 
yet I have heard such a being termed a " bar keep" by base 
degenerate men whose very existence was a breach of Nature's 
great law. I heard lately of a man rash enough to interrupt 
one of our most talented bar keepers while eugaged in the 
composition of a punch saying audaciously ; '• There, that's 
good enough, you needn't mix it any more." The being 
gave him one look. Jove's silent frown is more dreadful than 
all his thunder. That man's whisky drinking prospects were 
ruined for life. He never drank at a bar agaiu, and makiug a 
virtue of necessity joined a temperance society. 

There are objects in nature which seem created for no other 
purpose than to be looked upon from a distance with awe, 
admiration and terror. Of what seeming use is the iceberg? 
It is towering, grand, cold, unapproachable. It may be looked 
upon but not touched, aud from it are wafted breezes which 
chill the blood. What purpose serves the comet ? Coming 
from the unknown regions of the infinite it bears a dread 
grandeur and sublimity. It, is imposing, but it fill the mind 
with vague forebodings of awful events. We wonder but do 
not rejoice. And for what did Providence or nature intend 
the rattlesnake, or the hotel clerk ? Such queries weigh upon 
some reflective minds, driving them to the verge of insanity. 

But it is evident that the latter serves upon a smaller scale 
a like purpose with the iceberg and the comet. He is the 
embodiment of dignity. A man builds a hotel — no, a pal. 
ace. It's furnishings are regal. That everything should be 
in keeping, Caviliers in doublet and hose, princes with plumed 
caps, covered with stars and orders of merit, and ladies hav- 
ing their trains and attendant pages should sweep those 
halls instead of the modern skirts, coats and pantaloons. 



The practical spirit of the age will not allow this. Still 
these must be dignity to comport with the palatial caravan- 
sary. People from abroad who live plainly, who dine at 
twelve, who have dinner without soup and wine must be im- 
pressed with the dignity of the house. They must become 
dignified themselves. To become this there must be a 
fount from which to draw thi3 attribute. The 
proprietor of the hotel casts about him for such a 
fount. He searches anxiously and wearily. Daily he posts 
himself upon the street, awl anxiously scans the passers-by. 
It i3 tiresome. He becomes moody and abstracted. He 
grows emaciated and refuses nourishment. His wife grows 
jealous, thinking his affections are engrossed by some unat- 
tainable rival. The hotel remains silent and unoccupied. 
People wonder why it is not opened. At length, after weeks 
of weary watching, he sees from afar the " coming man." It 
is he, the man whose sole occupation through life has been the 
cultivation of dignity. He reeks with it. It drops from him 
as he moves majestically along. He does not walk. Do the 
gods walk ? Involuntarily the crowd parts aside from him as 
he progresses. The proprietor rushes wildly toward him. 
Terror seizes his heart lest the newly discovered world of 
dignity be possessed by some rival. He reaches him. He 
falls upon his knees before him. He cries " Kureka I" Then 
he faints, then he recovers, then he calls a carriage and bun- 
dles himself and the acme of dignity therein. He drives to 
the hotel. He walls in his treasure behind a mahogauy 
carved counter. He gives him two hundred and fifty dollars 
per month. It is finished. The statue surmounts the column. 
Dignity is enthroned. 

And yet this man is my benefactor. For years I have been 
snubbed by humanity. I, too, am a trifle soured. He is my 
avenger. In the avenging mood I go aud sit humbly in his 
court. I behold a presumptuous man feebly inquiring relative 
to some friends suspected of stopping at the hotel. And the 
Being flashes down thunderbolts of dignity upon him, and 
man abjectly retires with the sense of degredation and in- 
feriority strong upon him. I am gratified. He is a repre- 
sentative of the race whose hands have so heavily been laid 
upon me. Now he is smitten. Now he " knows how it 
feels." I go forth rejoicing. 



Macdonald's Mills, Market Btreet, corner of Beale, is the oldest 
and most extensive manfacturing mill in San Francisco. It was es- 
tablished over fourteen years ago, when gold dast was yet the princi- 
pal portion of our circulating medium, aud has always maintained the 
[ead in its peculiar branch of articles manufactured — that of doors, 
sashes, blinds, mouldings and finishing work for buildings. Mac. puts 
his own hands to the plow, and is a striking illustration of the old 
proverb that success will always attend those who attend to their own 
business. Some idea may be formed of the capital required and the 
extensive amount of work done at Macdonald's Mills, when we state 
that some two hundred men are daily employed. Certainly a large 
capital must be required to carry on such an establishment. 

What's the Matter ?— In passing through Third street yesterday, 
we saw crowds of people entering a building a tew doors below Mar- 
ket street, and vi e inquired of a passer by what's the matter ? 
He answered that they were going to h ave their pictures taken in the 
New York Photographic Gallery, and the cause of the rush was that 
this took the best and cheapest pictures in the city ; the inducement 
must be much to draw so big a crowd from Montgomery aud the other 
streets iu the northern part of the city. 

Portland Boiler Work*. — Moynihan & Aitkin, proprietors. 
This firm have their whole force employed manufacturing boilers lor 
steamers, Quartz, Flour and Saw Mills. Recently the new boilers for 
the America were made at these works, and reflect credit on the skill 
of the proprietors and the competency of their workmen, not only to 
make boilers, but machinery superior to that manufactured at the East. 
The Poland Boiler works are ou Mission street, between Fre- 
mont aud Beale streets. 



DRAMATIC AFFAIRS- 

ON Monday evening Miss Helen Western appear. 
" Lady Isabel " and " Madame Vine " in the play , 
East Lynne, at Maguire's Opera House. She did not add to 
her reputation in San Francisco by her acting on this occa- 
sion, though those who expected to see her tear a passion to 
tatters, to very rags, were agreeably surprised except in the 
scene representing the death of " Lady Isabel's" son, where 
Miss Western did shriek in the most most unartistic manner. 
Mrs. Sophie Edwin is certainly as yet the best " Lady Isabel" 
we have seen on the San Francisco stage. We await the ar- 
rival of Lucille Western, and even then we have confidence in 
our California actress being able to hold her own. 
It is not, perhaps, quite fair to compare newly-arrived 
Eastern artistes with our California favorites but I 
must say that J. A. Heme's impersonation of " Sir Francis 
Levison " was not nearly so finished a performance as that of 
Charles Thorne, Jr. The former is almost a rowdy, while the 
latter was, though brutal, always a gentleman. Mr. Heme 
had a good benefit on Tuesday and gave general satisfaction 
by his acting in the character of " Wild Murtough " in Green 
Bushes, and " Solon Shingle" in the People's Lawyer. The 
engagement of Miss Helen Western closes to-night. Last 
night she took a benefit, the play of Captain Kyd was per- 
formed. To-night the same piece will be played, and Mr. J. 
A. Heme will afterward appear in the character of " Toodles." 
Miss Helen Western and the company at present at the Opera 
House will take a tour up country on Monday. 

The Martinetti troupe conclude their engagement at the 
Metropolitan to night. On Monday the theater will be opened 
under new management with Harry Leslie and Harry Raynor, 
late of Christy's Miustrels, supported by a good company for 
the production of American minstrelsy and Burlesque Opera. 
Everyone must remember with pleasure the minstrel enter- 
tainment of Birch and Backus. Messrs. Leslie and Raynor 
are of the same class of artists, and the company will be or- 
ganized so as to give a family entertainment abounding with 
humor, mirth and music, without a taint of grossness ; such, 
in fact, as we used to have in the days when Birch and Wam- 
bold sang to crowded and delighted houses. 

On Thursday night the last Hawthorne entertainment of 
the season was given at Union Hall. The comedy of Wood- 
cock's LUtle Game was performed ; the lady who filled the 
part of Mrs. Larking, far eclipsed all the other ladies and gen- 
tlemen taking part in the performance. 

On Tuesday the Ciprico Theatrical Association gave an en- 
tertainment at Turn Verein Hall. The Lady of Lyons was 
performed ; the lady who exacted " Pauline " was fully up to 
her part, reading and acting very well. 

Mrs. Laura Cuppy will deliver her usual lecture at Mechan- 
ics' Hall this evening. These lectures are highly appreciated 
by all who have heard them. 

Touchstone. 



B. C. Horn & Co. — This favorite House, so long celebrated for the 
superiority of its imported Tobacco and Cigars, have just received the 
long expected Hibemia Smokiug Tobacco, which proves to be the best 
ever imported. Try it. They are also offering 500,000 cigars at the 
surprising low rate of $5 per thousand. Everybody can afford to smoke 
cigars at that rate. 

Sick People may have the benefit of the long experience, skill, 
and practical knowledge acquired during more than twenty-five years, 
and cures without medicines, by employing Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic 
Temple. * 

Cures Guaranteed to the Sick in almost all cases — without 
medicine, mesmeric jugglery, or any species of fraud or deception, by 
Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple. * 

Dyspepsia Cured, not patched up, guaranteed thorough, and to 
the entire satisfaction of the invalid, by the unfailing process of Dr. 
Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple. * 

Poison Oak.— The effects of this pestiferous shrub are now most 
virulent. Dr. Bourne's method is the only reliable cure. No. 10 
Masonic Temple, Post street. * 

Electricity. — Four bits for the use of the powerful electro-mag- 
netic battery of Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple, Post street. Useful 
in neuralgia, etc. * 

" D*. Rourne's Baths." — The uniform testimony is, that as a 
luxury, or for the cure of ailments, they are unequalled — No. 10 
Masonic Temple. * 

Young Men requiring the aid of a physician can receive important 
information, gratuitously, by applying tc Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic 
Temple. * 



Hayes' Park. — This favorite resort of pleasure-seekers will 
offer great attraction to-morrow. The gardens are in splendid 
order, and numerous amusements are offered. Miss Ella La 
Rue whose wonderful ascension on a rope last Sunday was 
witnessed by some 1,200 persons, will to-morrow make another 
grand ascension and perform her daring feats on the rope. In 
the course of a few weeks this daring funambuliste will walk 
from the Cliff House to Seal Rock. 



Woodward's Gardens. — This wonderful piebald doe which 
has been added to the fine collection of animals at these gar- 
dens is the object of general admiration. We will not vouch 
for the truth of the Tunes' statement that any Indian who 
kills a piebald doe is elected chief of his tribe, but can cer- 
tainly say that this spotted piebald half white deer is a most 
extraordinary animal. 

The last entertainment given by the " Hawthornes " came 
off on Thursday evening, at Union Hall. It was the most 
elegant and recherche affair of the Kind that has yet taken 
place in San Francisco. The audience was large and fashiona- 
ble ; the pieces were rendered in the most admirable style ; 
and the entire entertainment passed off with great eclat. 

Martin's Restaurant. — This old and popular restaurant was 
chosen by the British Benevolent Society to get up their dinner last 
evening, which was 6erved on the upper floor, under the caterer- 
ship of Louis Dingeon, the proprietor, to numerous members of the 
Society and their invited guests, without any inconvenience to the 
many patrons of ttie restauraut proper. A feat which no other res- 
taurant in the city could do. 

New Grocery House.— J. W. McKee, a well-kuown pioneer resi- 
dent of this city, has just opened, in the new block, at No. 31 Kearny 
street, just below Post, the neatest grocery store in San Francisco, 
with a 'stock consisting of the choicest articles obtainable in that, line 
of trade. In compliment to his lady customers, and in compliance to 
the ijeneral fitness of things, Mr.-McK.ee should call his neat store tl.« 
Ladies' Grocery Store. _ 

Neptune Boiler Works.— This establishment is in full tide of 
business, manufacturing boilers for Quartz. Flour and Saw Mills, a 
large force is employed outside hammering away at work to complete 
orders on hat.d. Duncan Cameron in proprietor of these works, and 
is well known amoug the "Iron men" as a first class workman. 
These works are locafed at the corner of Mission and FreemontBtreets. 

We are indebted to J. Ross Browne for a copy of the " Re- 
ports Upon 'he Mineral Resources of the United States, by 
Special Commissioners J. Ross Browne aud James W. Tay- 
lor." 



/ 



6 



The Californian. 



A SEA-CHASE. 

WE had been lying in Aden Harbor for months, almost 
"grounding on our beef-bones." All hands were 
anxious to go out for a cruise, and have a good blow once 
more ; for the sultriness of that land locked harbor, with the 
huge peak of Jibbel Shum-shuui towering above it on the side 
of the peninsula, and with the arid desert on the other band 
—all access to which was expressly prohibited in " general 
orders," for the natives were a lawless set of savages, who cut 
the throat of every one with a white skin— so great, I say, was 
the sultriness of this God forsaken harbor, and so depressing 
the ennui (if it can be allowed to men-of-war's men to suffer 
from so fashionable a malady) of doing nothing, that when 
news came from a friendly native quarter that some slavers 
were moored in Berberah Creefc, and in the act of shipping 
their living freight, a large proportion of whom had ju3t ar- 
rived from the far interior, the intelligence was received with 
welcome by all on board the Honorable Company's ship of 
war, Rajpoot. 

The Rajpoot was a small schooner, not much larger than 
an ordinary yacht, being about one hundred and fifty tons. 
She carried an armament of five guns, and a crew, all told, of 
fifty-three men and officers. How we all stowed away was a 
miracle in the way of packing ; yet, small as she was, I have 
weathered many a gale in that tight little craft. I have cruised 
about the Indian Ocean in her in all weathers, and have seen 
her hammering against a stiff nor'-wester in the Persiau Gulf 
for a fortnight ; and all seamen who have sailed on that in- 
land sea will bear me witness when I say that a nor'-wester in 
the Gulf is what the Yankees would call " a caution " in the 
way of gales. 

I was First Lieutenant of the Rajpoot, though only a youth 
of twenty ; for in the defunct Indian navy, a service which 
was always short of officers, it was customary to give young- 
sters acting commissions as Lieutenants. I will not say any- 
thing of the captain, who, though a young man to command a 
ship-of-war, was as smart a seaman as ever trod a deck ; or of 
my messmates, who were my juniors in age, as well as in rank ; 
but proceed to my tale, merely premising that Berberah, the 
place to which we were bound, is a port on the African coast- 
distant, with a fair wind, not more than about a couple of 
days' sail from Aden. 

The day after receiving the above news, the order came 
from the senior naval officer to our captaiu to make the best 
of his way to Berberah, and pick up what we could. "Loose 
sail!" was now the word, and away up the rigging swarmed 
the " Kajpoots ;" and the little schooner was soon under a 
cloud of canvas, and bowling along with a stiff top-gallant 
breeze, at her eight knots an hour, for " Afric's arid shore.' 
Ere night fell, we had lost sight of old Shum-shum, with its 
little watch-tower and flagstaff hidden in the light fleecy 
clouds generally crowning the venerable summit of that pre- 
cipitous mountain. We were not long out of sight of laud, 
however, for early on the following morning the range of hills 
inland of the town of Berberah became visible. The wind 
being still fair, we ran round the " spit '' which protects the 
harbor from the sea, and renders it oue of the chief ports on 
that coast; and soon after sunset iLe little craft cast her 
anchor, and became the theme of converse and wonderment 
among the crowds of armed and half-naked Sooiuaulies, who 
lined the beach and speculated on the mission that had brought 
us into their waters. The sails were quickly furled, and then 
the first cutter was called away by the boatswain's mate ; and 
within five minutes after our anchoiiug, the boat was pulled 
away for the shore. I went in charge, and our errand I will 
now explain. 

Moored close to that part of the head of the creek which 
adjoined the miserable clump of huts dignified by the term of 
town, were assembled about twenty Arab craft, called by the 
natives bughlahs. These vessels, we knew, were nothing more 
nor less than slavers, and we had been given to understand 
that they had embarked their quota of slaves, preparatory to 
taking their departure for Hoodeidah and Mocha, in the Red 
Sea. Berberah is, or rather was, at the time I write, the chief 
slave-mart on this part of the coast, north of Zanzibar, and 
did literally a " roaring " business in human flesh. As our 
advent was doubtless unexpected, we hoped to " puckerow " 
some of these unhappy wretches, when, besides the pecuniary 
gain of five pouud3 head-money per slave, there was the relish 
of adventure, the spice of danger, and lest, but not least in 
the eyes of honest Jack, who is a tender-hearted soul, the 
happiness of freeing fellow-creatures (though he called tbem 
niggers) from the clutch of cruel masters and icfamous pro- 
curers. 

We expected to see consternation depicted on the counte- 
nonces of the crews of the buglahs waiting for our inspection ; 
but, on the contrary, they seemed to take the matter very 
;oolly, and as we approached nearer to them, we observed the 
black fellows crowding^the high poops, and calmly criticising 
our performance. Was there treachery in this, or what did it 
mean ? 

Of all the turbulent, reckless savages in the world, commend 
me to these si»me Soomaulies for the possession of these qual- 



ities in a highly developed form. They are a cruel and treach- 
erous race, and care for nothing but brute force. Talk to them 
forever, and they would but laugh at you; but speak to them 
through the muzzles of your guns, and they will obey with 
curses, not loud, but deep. So I have ever found them, and 
so Captains Burton and Speke testify of them. Not many 
hundreds of yards from this very spot had both those brave 
gentlemen, but a month or two before, escaped from theircruel 
hands. On that terrible occasion, poor Stroyan, of our ser- 
vice, was murdered, and often have I heard the late Captain 
Speke talk of that narrow escape as one of the most exciting 
in his adventurous life. But we knew whom we had to deal 
with, and had come fully armed to meet them. Presently the 
cutter struck against that one of the bnglahs moored at the 
end of the line. On hailing the vessel, the skipper appeared 
at the gangway, all smiles, and invited me to come on board 
and accept a cup of coffee. Followed by the coxswain, a 
brawny tar, who might have encountered the hug of a grizzly 
bear on equal terms, with half a dozen of the others, " all good 
men and true," and armed with sword3 and pistols, we swarmed 
up the wall-like side, and climbing through the open ports and 
over the bulwarks, stood on the deck, and gazed around us. 

There were only a few of the native sailors lying about the 
deck, amusing themselves. Some were eating, some gambling, 
but the majority sleeping, as your true Oriental always will, 
whenever he can get a chance. I told the captain I wished to 
see the hold. Yery good, sir, said this official, in good Hin- 
dustanee, with a cheerful smile, and led the way below. The 
hold was empty ! There was nothing in it except the water- 
tanks, which, however, from their size and number, together 
with certain other signs, showed us that the vessel was unmis- 
takably a slave-ship. But the birds were flown, and we had 
been outwitted. They mu3t have received intimation of our 
approach, and had managed to disembark their wretched cargo 
in time to prevent their capture. It was evident, from the 
quiet, complacent grin on the face of the native captain, that 
he enjoyed our discomfiture, though I managed to hide all ap- 
pearance of disappointment under a careless bearing. I left 
the vessel, and paid similar visits to some of the other buglahs, 
but, of course, with a like result. Of one thing I was satisfied, 
that the slaves liad been shipped, though only to be disem- 
barked again when the little Rajpoot hove in sight. I said 
nothing, however, regarding that discovery, but returning the. 
obsequious "salaams" of the chiefs by salutations equally 
polite, 1 jumped down into my boat, and, certainly not in the 
best of humors, pulled back to the ship. 

On reporting to the captain the unccessful result of my 
evening's work, we were both unanimous in our opinion that 
it would never do to be thwarted in this manner; we must 
meet these cunning rascals with their own weapons. In the 
first place, we felt satisfied that the slaves who were " wan- 
ted " were concealed among the multitude of temporary huts 
erected during the season of the great fair, which was now in 
full swing ; or else were removed to some place of biding near 
at hand, so that, immediately our backs were turned, they 
could be reshipped, either here or at some desert part of the 
coast previously agreed upon as the rendezvous, and thus find 
their way into the slave-marts of Arabia. 

At length we determined to adopt a ruse. We allowed 
significant hints to be dropped to the natives who came along- 
side in their small canoes, ostensibly to sell fish or milk, and 
who, we knew, would carry back the intelligence to the mer- 
chants on shore, that we proposed cruising to the southward 
to iutercept certain buglahs coming from Zanzibar. About 
noon on the following day we weighed anchor, and stood out 
of the creek under a pleasant breeze from the westward. 
Crowds witnessed our departure from the beach, no doubt 
congratulating themselves on the defeat of the hated and 
dreaded " Feringhees." As the short twilight gave place to 
the shades of night, the range of hills in the background faded 
into obscurity. Now, thea, had come the time for action. 

The ship's course was altered again for the town we had 
just left ; in nautical phraseology we " hauled our wind," and 
stood back for the land. Under cover of the night, all this 
was of course unseen by our watchful friends, the slave-mongers. 
The breeze had fallen light ; and not far from us lay, almost 
becalmed, a large native craft with her huge mainsail and small 
" mizzeD " set. Without any noise we lowered a boat. The 
Second Lieutenant pushed off for the buglah with instructions 
to board and take possession of her. Soon a light exhibited 
for a moment low down her hull, and just above the surface of 
the calm sea, told us that she had been secured. The two 
vessels were steered for each other ; and about two o'clock in 
the morning (and uot a bit too early, for faint streaks on the 
horizon warned us of the approach of the harbinger of day) we 
were alongside the stranger. No time was lost. All our sails 
were taken in and furled. I may here explain that the Raj- 
poot, though a schooner, was square-rigged forward, and fore- 
and-aft-rigged on her mainmast. To prevent the possibility of 
our mastheads being discerned above the sails of the coaster 
we " housed " our forc-top-gallant-mast and main-top-mast ; 
the top-gallaut-yard also was sent down on deck, and the flying 
jib-boom rigged in, and then the Rajpoot was lashed ou the 



seaward side of the buglah. Her Arab crew were in a state 
of the most abject terror, and nothing would convince them 
that we had not the fullest designs on their lives and the mis- 
erable cargo of rice and mats they carried. 

The buglah's sails were kept set ; and a prize-crew being 
put in possession, she was steered up the coast. Owing to the 
currents, we had drifted to the southward of Berberah, and 
had great fears that oar scheme would, after all, end in a fail- 
ure, for there was not sufficient wind even to keep the two 
vessels, thus lashed together, in the position abreast of the 
town in which we had purposely placed ourselves before tak- 
ing in sail. Our object was to capture the slavers after they 
bad fairly left the harbor, and were standing up the coast to 
the northward ; but if the wind did not freshen sufficiently to 
drive us along under the canvas carried by our Siamese twin, 
as we christened her, our plans would be detected, and of 
course frustrated. All hands were terribly disgusted, and 
notwithstanding a concerto of whistling from the tars to woo 
the wind to our sails, the fickle element refused to be 
charmed. 

It was now eight o'clock, and there was still a dead calm ; 
unless a breeze sprung up before noon, it was evident that at 
the rate we were drifting to the southward, the hull of the 
man-of-war would be opened to the view of the people on 
shore ; and not only should we be again discomfited, butwbat 
was more humiliating, we should be the object of ridicule 
among the Soomaulie tribes on the coast. 

But Dame Fortune at length favored us. About ten 
o'clock a gentle breeze sprung np — quite sufficient to carry 
the twin-craft along. This revived our hopes, and we made 
preparations for a chase as soon as the slavers ventured out 
of the harbor, now abreast of us. 

About two o'clock we were made aware of the fact that, 
over the low land of the " spit " we could, with the aid of 
good glasses, make out the naked mast-heads of the vessels 
moored at the head of the harbor. Now this little forest of 
masts broke up, and rising to the summits of the bare mast- 
heads we could distinguish the broad latteen-shaped mainsails 
as the crews hoisted them slowly up. 

Hurrah ! the vermin were coming out of their holes. If we 
could only get them into the open, we had little fear but that 
we could run some of them to earth. Anxiously we watched 
the squadron as they slowly crept out of their warren, and 
showed their noses like timid hares when meditating a run 
across a piece of open country — a spot which their memory re- 
calls as fatal to many of their species, the scene of the short, 
agonized race for life ere the cruel greyhounds overtook, and 
before their eyes rent in pieces, their old companions. It 
seemed as if the vessels were endowed with -,'ife, as, one by 
one, they gradually drew their bows clear of the furtherm<V - 
point of the low spit, and not without misgivings committed 
themselves to the hazzards of a chase from the implacable foe 
which lay concealed within a mile of them, and like a hound 
straining at the leash, was counting the moments when the re- 
straining hawser would be " let slip." At length our time 
had come ; and the sailors, who had been lounging over the 
rail, and longing for the time for action, sprang to their posts 
with enthusiasm as the order was given: " Up masts and yards, 
and make sail I" 

The Rnjpoot was a dashing, rakish-looking craft, and was 
manned by a smart set of seamen who were worthy of their 
ship, and were trained to the perfection that discipline and 
continuous drilling alone can effect. It took little more than 
five minutes to " fid " the main top and for-top-gallant masts, 
and to " sway aloft " the top-gallant-yard. In two or three 
minutes more the sails were all " let fall " together, and 
'• sheeted home ;" the hawser binding us to the buglah was 
cast adrift, to the intense delight of the lascars of our late 
consort ; and we " forged ahead " just as if that old tub had 
been at anchor. 

And now began the excitement of a chase at sea. The 
sailors rubbed their hands, and danced with boisterous glee as 
the " old gal," as they affectionately called her, sent the spray 
flying over the forecastle in a briny shower, that threw back 
the rays of the noon-tide sun. The wind had freshened, and 
was just the one to bring out her sailing qualities. The Raj- 
poot swept down, hawk-like, on the covey of frightened craft , 
whose commanders seemed utterly bewildered by ber unex- 
pected appearance, to judge by the way in which they handled 
their commands. Some lowered their sails, as if to deprecate 
pursuit, and then hoisted them agaiu ; some turned back 
toward the harbor ; some continued their courso ; while 
others pushed boldly out to sea. 

We made straight, for the centre of the squadron, and fired 
a blank cartridge from one of our guns, as an order to them 
to "heave to." It was disregarded. Sauve qui pent wa3 the 
watchword among them, although, had they been gifted with 
an ordinary share of pluck, and shown fight, they might have 
escaped, for the combined crews stood to ours in the ratio of 
at least five to oue. and, moreover, they all carried guns ; but 
each skipper thought only of his own venture, and so they 
turned and fled. It certainly showed audacity on the part of 
the little schooner thus to dash among such a force, for uctu- 



The Californian. 



7 



ally somo of the buglal)3 were larger than she was ; but often 
sheer audacity wins the day. 

Necessity obliged us to confine our attention to some of 
the runaways, for we could not hope to capture all. The cap- 
tain soon made his choice : there was a greater probability of 
winning those coy fugitives who had pointed their prows sea- 
ward, for there no rocks and shoals could play the part of a 
stern duenna, aud warn us off the fair charmers. We singled 
three vessels out of the ruck. Every sail that would " draw" 
was set below and aloft, until the little vessel was almost hid 
beneath the flowin'g canvas, which bellied out high above our 
heads, and stretched along the lower studding-sail booms like 
the wings of some white bird of the ocean. The invigorating 
breeze blew from off the land with health-giving power, and 
jokes were bandied and bets laid as to the amount of the 
" haul " we should make. It would indeed be a piece of rare 
good luck if we should succeed in " bagging" all there, but it 
was quite on the cards. We were gaining on the fugitive 
craft — of that there could be no doubt. One, two. three 
hours passed, and we quickly neared the sternmost of them. 
The boats were made ready for lowering, the crews standing 
round them, with arms girt round their waists, for sometimes 
these slave-dealers, maddeued by the loss of their projected 
gains, prefer measuring swords with the hated Feringhees to 
tamely yielding up to their human cargo. 

The thirty-two-pounder pivot-gun was loaded, and the bul- 
warks lowered down ; at a signal, the gun was run out, the 
vessel "yawned" a little, and a round shot was sent on its 
message. So true was the aim of the captain of the gun, that 
the shot went clean through the hugh mainsail. It was a 
warning not to be denied ; the slaver " rounded to," and 
lowering her main-yard, surrendered at discretion. To let fly 
the studding-sail-sheets, throw everything aback, and lower 
the cutter with her crew and Second Lieutenant, was the work 
of two minutes. The Rajpoot's sails filled again, and we were 
off once more in pursuit. Well, to cut my yarn short, we 
brought the other two buglahs to their" bearings after a smart 
chase, and before sunset all three were ours, with prize-crews 
of ten men on board each. The native sailors were put in 
irons, to avoid a rescue, for they were to the prize-crews as 
three to one ; and then we " took stock " of our slaves — 
slaves no longer, but freemen the moment the " cross of red " 
was unfurled above their heads. 

There were one hundred and seven slaves in all, men, 
women, and children, though chiefly coming under the two 
latter categories. In company with our prizes we steered our 
course for Aden ; and as the Rajpoot had to accommodate 
her rate of speed to that ot the buglahs, we were a week in 
making ftfot port. One morning, to the no small astonishment 
of the merchantmen lying in the harbor, we sailed in, towing 
our three consorts. I know the officers of H. M. S. Thunder- 
clap were highly amused as the saucy Rajpoot made her ap- 
pearance, dragging in triumph the three prizes, each as large 
as herself. — Chambers' Journal. 



The Compass. — The compass may be said to have opened 
to man the dominion of the sea, and to have put him in full 
possession of the earth, by enabling him to visit every part of 
it. Flavio Gioia, a citizen of Amalfi, a town of considerable 
trade in the Kingdom of Naples, was the author of this great 
discovery, about the year 1302. It has often been the fate of 
those illustrious benefactors of mankind who have enriched 
science and improved the arts by their inventions, to derive 
more reputation than benefit from the happy efforts of their 
genius. But the lot of Gioia has been still more cruel ; though 
the inattention or ignorance ot contemporary historians he 
has been defrauded even of the fame to which he had such a 
just title. We receive from them no information with respect 
to his profession, his character, the precise time when he made 
this important discovery, or the accidents and inquiries that 
led to it. Near half a century elapsed from the time of 
Gioia's discovery before navigators ventured into any seas 
which they had not been accustomed to frequeDt. 

Love. — One who has suffered and come out strengthened 
from his encounter with the blind God, prints his experi- 
ence for the benefit of the young beginners. Love is like 
the devil, because it torments us ; like heaven, because it 
wraps the soul in bliss ; like salt, because it is relishing ; 
like pepper, because it sets us on fire ; like sugar, because it 
is sweet ; like a rope, because it is often the death of 
man ; like poison, because it makes us miserable ; like a 
man because here to-day and gone to-morrow ; like a woman, 
because there is no getting rid of it ; like a beacon, because 
it guides ua to the wished-for port ; like will-o'-the wisp, 
because it often leads one into a bog ;, like a fierce cour- 
ser, because it often runs away with one ; like a pony, be- 
cause it ambles nicely, like one ; like the bite of a mad 
dog, or the kiss of a pretty woman, because they both run 
us mad ; like a goose, because it is silly ; in a word, it is 
like a ghost, because it is like everything and nothing — 
often talked of, but never seen, touched or understood. 

The unhappiest of mortals are those who have more money 
or more time than they know how to use. 



THE CHIGNON. 

O ! bury me deep, with my waterfall on, 

And my bonnet so tiny and gay; 
Wrap all my fashionable gewgaws around 

This form when it turneth to clay. 

For I would astonish, long centuries hence, 

The learned explorers of tombs ; 
I would rival the mummy in interest when 

Some future Agassiz comes. 

To explain to the wondering children of Then 

The puzzling marvels of Now ; 
O ! I'll bother their heads with what's on my own, 

If they ever should find me, I vow ! 

OUR ASIOR HOUSE BREAKFAST. 

THE newspapers have had a report, lately, that the Astor 
House was to go the way of all things down town, in 
New York, and be converted into profitable but uncomfortable 
stores. I believe they have contradicted the rumor since, and 
given the delightful, home-like old hostelry at least three 
years more of life ; but I shall still act upon my original im- 
pulse, conceived when I first heard the painlul story, and re- 
lieve my conscience of a weight it has carried altogether too 
long, by unburdening myself of a certain incident in the se- 
cret history of the sturdy old inn, for the benefit of all con- 
cerned and the rest of mankind. 

It was in the winter of 1802-3, and I was engaged as army 
correspondent on a Boston paper of enterprise, vivacity and 
entire respectability combined. If this description leaves any 
curious reader in the dark as to the identity of the paper, he 
will have to turn back to the tiles in the Alheneum, 
and see which it was that had the lead in a brilliant 
though sad account of the battle of Fredericksburg — for it 
was with that very account in manuscript nearly complete in 
my pocket that I was traveling post-haste through New York 
on the occasion which I am about to describe. 

I have intimated that I beat all the other newspaper men 
in the field on this occasion ; and the details of how 1 did it 
might form material for another story, but there is no room 
for them in this. After confused, bewildering hours, I hardly 
know how many, of desperate fighting beginning in high hopes 
and ending in darkest despair, aud on my part of rapid writing, 
page after page, of my note-book filling up with the diary of the 
moments on which hung the fate of the army and of the war, 
as I sat on the steps of the Phillips House, and gazed across 
the river with my glass between each sentence — at last came 
the decision for retreat. My good fortune consisted in hear- 
ing of this climax of ill-fortune a little in advance of any of 
the other eager but weary journalists who were sleping near 
me at the moment. It did not take long to map out my plans ; 
and then a night ride across that dreadful sea of fathomless 
mud to Aquia Creek, the horrors of which I could not de- 
scribe if I would, but at the close of which I sold my horse 
to a Yankee sutler near the wharf for a cup of coffee, five 
dollars, and a rubber blanket. Perhaps some notion of the 
ordeal of the rido may be obtained from that fact ; for he 
was a good steed in the beginning, and I owed him gratitude 
for many hard rides successfully accomplished before, on the 
Peninsula and in the Valley of Virginia. He never did the 
newspaper which paid for, and the rider who trusted him a 
better service than his last ; for just as I swallowed the scald- 
ing, milkless black coffee which restored my own strength, 
and just as he sank steaming in the yellow puddle which 
fronted the sutler's tent, I learned'that a hospital transport 
with some of the wounded of the first day's fighting was at 
that moment leaving the wharf for Washington. 

A quick run brought me on board a minute before the plank 
wa9 withdrawn ; but it took a large share of the money I had 
about me to persuade a Pennsylvania Dutchman, who hap- 
pened to be sergeant of the guard, that I was not an able- 
bodied, demoralized straggler from the front, but one of those 
unrecognized gentry who conquered a right to go into all for- 
bidden places by the mystic " Press," or when that failed, as 
now, by the talismanic greenback. The day which followed, 
as we sped up the Potomac with a groaning, writhing cargo 
of agony, borne up by patriotism, tended by an ageut of the 
Sanitary Commission and myself, and alternately mutilated and 
neglected by a drunken surgeon who swore at our interferences 
as he staggered from a drink in the captain's cabin to a mur- 
der on the noisome, crowded deck. Doing what I could, I 
still found time to attend to the duties of my own profession, 
and made up a clear, terse, and graphic account of the events 
on the Rappahannock for telegraphing, besides obtaining the 
name, regiment and condition of every wounded and dead man 
on board the steamer. It was late in the afternoon, and, in 
that drizzly December day, already quite dark, when our slow 
steamer touched the Sixth street wharf in Washington. I 
calculated the time before tho departure of the New York 
train to a fraction of a minute, and found I had none to spare 
— so broke my rule in regard to Washington hackmen, and iu 
a minute or less from the landing, had chartered a carriage 
with a costly proviso that no other occupant, was to be waited 
for, and was trundling through the mud toward the Avenue. 



I was lucky enough to find our resident Washington corres- 
pondent in his office, or " bureau," as the boys were absurd 
enough to call it in their dispatches ; and he was keen enough 
to comprehend the situation in a moment, to inform me that 
by the difference between army time and Washington clocks I 
had fifteen minutes less than I supposed, to take my precious 
dispatch of exclusive intelligence for the telegraph wires with 
less than a doxen words of explanation, and to send me off to 
the railroad station at the full speed of my carriage after a 
halt fabulously brief. His cool alacrity, unperturbed either 
by newspaper victories or national defeats, quite took away 
my breath ; and it was not till we turned the corner near the 
station that I remembered that one of the two things I had 
to say to him was to request the loan of enough money to 
make me sure of having sufficient to get home with, as my 
hasty departure from Falmouth and the unexpected draft at 
the landing had reduced my immediate resources to a very 
low ebb. 

My memory came quite too late to turn back, however, and 
as we arrived at the station I paid my driver his quickly- 
earned five dollars with more of a sigh than I had ever wasted 
over the expenditure of office money before. I had but three 
fives and some small change left ; and as I recalled the price 
of a Boston ticket, it needed no long process in mental arith- 
metic to convince me that, hungry as I was, my twenty-four 
hours journey must be made on very short commons. Poverty 
sharpens the wits ; and this temporary impoverishment sharp- 
ened mine, as I ran to the office, to such an extent that I 
bought a ticket to New York only, instead of for the whole 
journey, remembering that the price of the through ticket in- 
cluded seventy-five cents for a coach-ride through New York 
while the distance might be traversed by a street car for one- 
twelfth of the sum. I jumped on board the starting train 
not a moment too soon ; and my first act, after finding a seat, 
was to make a thorough survey of the financial situation. 

Six dollars were first thrust resolutely out of the way, in 
an inner compartment of my wallet, for my fare to Boston ; 
and the balance which remained for the purchase of commis- 
sary supplies, after several countings over of the fractional 
currency — than rather a novelty, and fresh and new from the 
press — amounted to precisely ninety-five cents. Any wild 
desire which might have existed to expend the whole in the 
luxury of a berth in a sleeping-car was crushed by the remem- 
brance that the price was one dollar ; and I solaced myself 
with the thought that I was tired enough to sleep soundly and 
comfortably anywhere. There was a refreshment saloon at- 
tached to the night train at that time, but as 1 knew, from old 
experience, that the smallest viand on its counter would ex- 
haust my entire resources, 1 resolved to insult my hunger 
with an apple, and then smother it in sleep, and so reservo 
the bulk cf my fottune for the next day, when my appetite 
would be more peremptory and could be more economically 
satisfied. So I supped stoically on the mealy fruit which the 
basket of a passing vender supplied, and easily put myself to 



sleep with variations on a formula something like this : 

Apple 05 

Horse-car fare in New York 06 

Newspaper 05 

Breakfast, (coffee, eggs, and buckwheat cakes) 30 

Dinner at Springfield, (baked beans and aie) 45 

Margin for accidents aud contingent expenses 04 



95 

My very neat an symmetrical plan was not destined to be 
carried out beyond the first item ; for as I opened my eyes in 
the ferry boat at Jersey City (I had contrived, in some myste- 
rious way, to effect the change of cars then necessary at Phil- 
adelphia without awakening to consciousness beyond that of 
an unusually hideous dream)— my slow-returning senses were 
jogged by a vision of charming Sallie Burton of Boston, sit- 
ting on the opposite side of the cabin, wrapped up to her eyes 
in shawls and furs, yet looking as lovely as ever, and— though 
she must have traveled all night in the same car with myself 
—as fresh aud blooming as when I bade ber good-bye the pre- 
vious summer on the piazza of the Rockland House. 

She saw me almost as soon as I discovered her, and the gen- 
uine joy and tenderness that mingled in the tones of her 
startled little "Oh, Robert!" as it blended with my "By 
Jove ! Sallie—" made me feel as if it were the news of a 
glorious victory instead of that of a tragic defeat that I was 
carrying home to Boston. I had been wooing the dear girl 
furiously in those halcyon days at Cohassett, and had just be- 
gun to dare to hope of winning her, when the order came from 
the office sending me post-haste at an hour's notice to join 
McClellan on the Chicahominy. I had dallied with my fate 
ever since, dreading to risk my future happiness on a letter, 
and forcing myself to be content with the sweet dreams of 
Sallie's face which came to me night after night as I shared 
the soldier's bivouac, and strove with every nerve to gain that 
promotion aud distinction which should give me a better title 
to ask her for heart and hand when the day should come. 
Now her sudden appearance at the very moment when [ 
seemed to have got so near the goal, the evident emotion with 
which she met me so unexpectedly, seemed like a taste of Par- 
adise. 

[continued UN TtlE 10th pase.] 



8 



The California n. 



NO TIC E. 

The publication of "The Californian'' takes place on Saturday 
mornings, and copies may be obtained in the City at all News 
stands, and of our News-agents through ilie. country. It will also 
be served by Carrie"' on Hie morning of publication. 

White & Bauer, News Dealers, No. 4i:J Washington street, are 
General Agents for The Californian in the interior counties oj 
this State , also, for the adjacent States and Territories. 

All kinds of JOB PRINTING done with neatness and despatch 
at reasonable rates. 



THE CALIFORNIAN. 



SAN FKANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 25, 1867 



JUGGLERY AND SPIRITISM. 

THE Spiritist imposter, W. T. Church, who was so thor- 
oughly exposed in Louisville, Kentucky, not long ago' 
seems previous to that occurrence to have been highly es- 
teemed as a medium, and to have enjoyed the full confidence 
of his sect. The expose at Louisville took place on the 16th 
or 17th of March last ; but prior to that time, and as far 
back as November 1866, charges of imposture had been 
brought against him. These, however, were not substantiated 
by any proofs as complete and decisive as in the Louisville 
case, where the sudden lighting of half a dozen lucifer matches 
revealed the juggler in the very act of imposture. Those 
charges, however, had the effect of eliciting a card signed by 
thirteen leading Spiritists of Decatur, Illinois, where the 
earlier suspicions against Church arose, in which card they em- 
phatically endorse him as "one of the most extraordinary me- 
diums in the world," further certifying that " his soul is deeply 
imbued with the soul-inspiring principles of our beautiful 
Philosophy." 

The signers of the card also state that Church " is really 
doing a great work in convincing sceptics, as well as giving 
great comfort " to those who are already believers, and 
" heartily recommend him to the cordial reception of all who 
love the heaven-born truths of our beautiful Philosophy," 
with much more of the peculiar jargon of the sect, to the same 
purport. Of the means by which the medium afforded so 
" great comfort " to the souls of tho faithful, and demon- 
strated the " heaven-born truths" etc , the card furnishes a curi- 
ous and edifying account. Having formed his circle, and 
placed himself upon a chair, the spiritual exercises proceeded 
as follows : 

" A tape-string cf about twelve feet long was passed through 
the armholes of his vest, being crossed and sewed together in 
front ; thence it was passed several times around each arm, 
and at the crossing sewed to his coat and underclothes. It 
was then sewed to the leg of his pants and drawers ; thence it 
was put around the rounds of his chair on each side, and thence 
extended to the floor and tacked. At every place of attach- 
ment, either to his clothes, the chair or floor, it was covered 
with fresh melted sealingwax and stamped, so that if by any 
possibility he should get loose, he could not replace the seal, 
etc. Under this condition the usual manifestations were had 
— euch as playing on the accordeon, ringing the bells, spirits 
talking to and handling their friends." 

The card containing these particulars is dated " Decatur. 
111., Dec, 1866." The account of Church's exposure, con- 
tained in the Louisville Journal of March 19tb, 1867, throws 
some light upon the manner in which thess wonderful " man- 
ifestations " were produced. Dr. D. R. Jones, of Louisville, 
who was anxious to " investigate," confided his intentions to 
a few friends who agreed to aid him in carrying out his plan. 

Accordingly, on the evening selected for the " experiment,' 
after the medium had been duly secured, and the lights ex- 
tinguished as usual, the Doctor, as soon as the manifestations 
began, slipped off his boots, and stole to the chair where 
Church should have beeu sitting. But the chair was vacant. 
The accordeon, " played by the spirit of a little Swiss girl," 
was however going, and during the intervals the ghost of 
" Nimwaukee " an Indian was heard stalking over the floor. 
The little Swiss occasionally caressed and kissed some favored 
individuals in the circle, and " Nimwaukee" furnished le33 
gentle physical proofs of his presence, and cracked stale jest* 
in broken English. When the performance was at its height, 
the Doctor gave the signal agreed upon by whistling, where 
upon half a dozen matches were simultaneously lighted, and 
Church was revealed to the astonished circle, unbound, and 
nearly naked, in the act of producing the manifestations. The 
method by which he effected his release was quite simple. 
His clothes were made much too large for him, and the lights 
being extinguished, he could slip out of his gaiments. walk 
about the room, ring bells, play upon the accordeon and per- 
sonate Indians, angels, pod Swiss girls at pleasure. I he perform 
nnce over, he resumed his clothing, and when his confederals 
brought in the light, no one would suppose that he had ever 
moved. " There are many remarkable featured m the medium, 
ship of Bro. Church " say the Decatur certificate, •• winch 
place the mauifestatiuus upon the highest scale ..tlaiued as 
yet." 



AUTHORITY AND BELIEF. 

NOTHING is more characteristic of the class of persons 
who delight to style themselves " liberal thinkers " 
than the utter contempt which they exhibit for authority in 
all matters of opinion. With the presumption that belongs 
to that stage of intellectual development which lies between 
utter stupidity and clear insight, and with that conceit of 
superior knowledge which is the ordinary badge of the sinat- 
terer and the sciolist, they not only insist upon " investi- 
gating " all subjects independently, but ridicule all belief that 
if not founded upon such personal investigation. 

Nowhere in the world is this class of intellectual demagogues 
so numerous orso mischievous in their influence as in the United 
States, because nowhere else is there so general a diffusion of 
that amount of knowledge and education which causes men to 
take an interest in " isms " and " ologies," without qualifying 
them for thorough independent examination of their merits 
Men who are not educated at all, cannot be made to concern 
themselves very seriously about the theories of pseudo philos- 
ophers, Spiritists and " free thinkers ;" while men who have 
been thoroughly educated, are in little danger of being deluded 
by them. It is among the intermediate classes that the vol 
uble expounders of spurious philosophy and impure religions 
find their readiest dupes. The self-sufficiency that spurns at 
authority and repels instruction is dot so often a characteristic 
of the uneducated as of the half-educated, of those who having 
learned just enough to imagine that they know everything 
set up for teachers and philosophers, exulting in the privilege 
of dogmatising for themselves, and for all who are so weak as 
to accept them as guides. 

This flattering appeal to conceit and presumption, the sneer 
agaiest blind deference to "authority," the invitation to 
'• investigate," extended to those who have neither the time 
nor the capacity for investigation in the sense in which it is 
designed to be understood — these are are among the most suc- 
cessful arts of the intellectual demogogne, and wherever we 
see them practiced upon u popular audience in cases involving 
the necesity of scientific investigation, the proof of charlatan- 
ism is complete. 

The truth is, that there are many things which the vast 
majority of men in the present condition of society do and 
must believe upon authority, and to teach the contrary is no 
less mischievous than silly. How many, for example, of those 
who accept without question the statements of men of science 
in regard to the distance of the sun from the earth, the 
period in which the latter traverses its orbit, the relative bulk 
of the planets, are capable of verifying these statements for 
themselves, or even of comprehending the reasonings and the 
processes by which their accuracy is established? When Pro- 
fessor Whitney assures us that Mt. Shasta is so many thou- 
sand feet high, we do not withhold our belief on the ground 
that we have not ourselves measured the base lines and taken 
the angles, and worked out all the trigonometrical calculations 
by which the result is reached. In such, and thousands of 
similiar cases, we believe upon authority, and act reasonably 
and sensibly in so doing ; and it is, to say the least, quite as 
much out of the question for the masses of mankind to make 
any really thorough and independent examination of the funda- 
mental questions of philosophy or religion, as it is for them 
to measure for themselves the heights of mountains or the 
distances and orbits of the planets. 

When such issues as those between Coleridge and Bentham, 
between Renan and de Pressense, betweeu Hamilton and Mill, 
or between Compte and Cousin, are to be decided, there is 
not one in a thousaud even of " educated men " in the Ameri- 
can sense of the phrase, who is competent to examine and 
pronounce upon them independently, and the pretence of 6uch 
examination and decision is in the vast majority of cases, a 
deplorable and demoralizing farce. Accordingly, that in- 
stinctive respect for authority which is a part of our mental 
constitution, is not to be regarded as a weakness ; nor is the 
man who, iu the conflict of opinions, listens with respect to 
its voice, to be reproached as one who has renounced the pre- 
rogative of private judgment, since he merely takes authority 
into the estimate as one of the elements upon which a decision 
is to be formed. The blustering assertion of independence ol 
authority on the part of the ignoraut, is the mere bravado of 
thoughtlessness and folly ; and the exhortation to " indepen- 
dent investigation " when addressed to those who do not pos- 
sess the capacity to examine the grounds upon which a judg 
ment must be founded, is simply an artful demagogical appeal 
As a matter of fact, the judgments of the great majority of 
men are, and must be, to a considerable extent influenced by 
auiho. iiy. on a large class of subjects. This is so in art and 
fcience, and literature, as well as in matters of belief, lu- 
stiucled opiniou influences popular opinion, and affects where 
it does not control its verdicts ; and those are the happiest and 
best oidered communities, ot which this may be most empha- 
tically affirmed. It is generally a simpler matter to decide 



Nor is there serious danger that deference to authority will 
be carried too far ; least of all does such danger exist in this 
age and country. Indeed, it has been charged, that our sys- 
tem of government tends to destroy in the minds of the peo- 
ple all respect for what is in the best sense superior, and to 
stimulate conceit, presumption and hollow pretension. It 
must at least be considered that in our society as at present 
constituted, confidence is more apt to outstrip ability than to 
lag behind it, and that exhortations to the people at large to 
exercise their own independent judgment upon all subjects 
whether political, literary, philosophical or religious, without 
regard to old ideas and settled standards, are not urgently 
needed. Mr. Nesmith of Oregon, recently declared in the United 
States Senate that a knowledge of art was not necessary to 
enable a man with a good eye to judge of the merit of a 
statue ; and if he had proposed to decide a question of the 
kind by a popular vote, the suffrage being extended to all 
electors ot sound vision, we have no doubt that the sugges- 
tion would have been applauded by the majority of his con- 
stituents. Upon the whole we think that the alarm of the 
demagogues and pretenders who Beem to dread the wholesome 
restraints of authority as inimical to their own influence, is 
groundless ; excessive reverence for whnt is venerable, or un- 
due readiness to waive the exercise of independent judgment 
in deference to any authority whatever, is assuredly not one 
of the characteristics of the American, and still less of the 
Californian mind of this generation. 



LOCAL ART NOTES. 

KEITH'S latest picture of " Tamalpais," as seen from 
Angel Island, to which attention has been called by 
Stoddard's poem, lately published in The Californian, has 
been placed by its purchaser at Snow & Roos' for a short time. 
This water color is noticeable for its fresh and brilliant, yet 
harmonious and truthful coloring. As our artists have too 
often given us the pale, faded and sun-dried tints so prevalent 
in our summer scenery, it is refreshing indeed to fiud one who 
renders nature in her pleasantest garb. The distance in this, 
as in all Mr. Keith's paintings, is finely preserved ; aDd the 
grand old mountain, over whose sides are rolling huge bauks 
of sea fog, though so remote, loses nothing of its grandeur . 
One distinctive and pleasing feature of the work of this artist, 
is his excellent management of foliage which, in iu graceful 
grouping and carefully preserved individuality, shows close 
study of nature. The picture is far better than the water color 
by Mitchell, an English artist, which is on exhibition at the 
same place. Mr. Keith has made rapid strides to an enviable 
position in his profession, and as the branch of-f-vinting in 
which he has met with such success, is at at last winning its 
long withheld and well merited appreciation in all quarters, 
his merits will be less likely now than formerly to escape pub- 
lic attention and reward. 

Gutierrez has on exhibition at the same place a remarkable 
portrait of Consul Godoy, which is by far the be3t woik of 
its kind we have seen on this coast. Another of his paiut- 
ings, evidently the likeness of some raven-haired senorita, is 
painted with great vigor and apparent fidelity, and is a fine 
specimen of his coloring. The few pictures he has exhibited 
here show that he has been educated in a good school of art, 
and would at once give him an elevated position in the most 
critical art circles. He possesses a very correct eye for draw- 
ing, a pure judgment in the choice of colors, and a remarkable 
facility for giving his subjects an appearance of entire uncon- 
sciousness and easy grace. His effects ape very striking, yet 
they appear to have been produced without labor, and though 
he paints with such fidelity to details that we vainly look for 
some trivial omission, there is no such painful attention to the 
minute accessories as to divert the eye from the main subject 
of his pictures. We understand that Mr. Gutierrez is from 
the City of Mexico ; that the misfortune of being plundered 
on bis journey hither, let t him few specimens of his skill for 
exhibition, and that his stay on this coast is but temporary 
and preparatory to a tour Eastward and abroad. We regret 
that our patronage of art is too uncertain to leave a hope of 
his remaining permanently in San Francisco. 

Marple has of late improved very much and gives promise 
of great excellence. His paintings have shown considerable 
study and care, but their chief fault has been an unnatural 
paleness and washed out appearance. One production of hia, 
exhibited at Snow & Roos', representing a scene on Russian 
River is far in advance of his previous efforts, being painted 
with a bolder and freer hand and with much better effect, 
though still too sombre and dull in color. Of his view of the 
Sbephard Quartz Lode we cannot say much; but with such 
scenery it is hard to make an attractive landscape. 

Young has painted a view of Tamalpais, and Kipps a sketch 
of Helmet Rock. The former shows some promise ; the latter 
very little. 

Arriola, who is the most versatile of all, has executed a 



This is nn encomium the justice of wh'ch we are not in Lp ur , t| lB qualifications ot a teacher, than upon the soundness , Sashing satire on the prevailing fashion in female head gear. 

VtSSAtlZi nerV^r* 0f Whathe ship-owner 'S^l of navigation It is painted with animation and freedom, and if it had the 

nviy, nevertheless, k'atisfy himself as to the capacity of the artist's usual careful execution in addition to its present spirit 
officers to whom he entrusts tiis vessel t would be a very creditable picfire. 



HXpl 

lew if any spoil im-diunis i>. I he world." vVe ai - mo ined 
believe on the coutrary that there aie a gieat many of the 



The Californian. 



9 



At Duncan's auction room is a small collection of paintings 
by Arriola, Denny, Bush and Marple. The best landscapes are 
Marple's, but few of these do him much credit, for he has shown 
us in some of his later work that he can do vastly better. From 
such sales as this it is impossible to judge how generously our 
people patronize art. When our first artists offer their best 
handiwork to the public under circumstances favorable to free 
exhibition and critical examination, we are certain that they 
will meet with hearty encouragement. They certainly owe it 
to themselves that such a collection aa this we have noticed 
shall not be dignified with the name of an " Artists' Sale "— 
and pass as a specimen of what San Francisco artists can do. 

Our scanty means of exhibition and private sale do not give 
our people the opportunity which we believe they would gladly 
Beize to patronize the deserving ; and the pride we feel in the 
work of such excellent and promising artists as Nahl, Keith 
Wandesforde, Marple and others, leads us to hope for a 
speedy public exhibition and sale of their best paintings, if 
only to test the popular appreciation of their merits. 

AsTRJSA. 



LOCAL ARCHITECTURAL NOTES. 

THE new building for the Merchants' Exchange is now so 
far advanced toward completion that its outlines and 
proportions sufficiently indicate its architectual character to 
admit of intelligent criticism. 

While in its general effects, it is, as we had anticipated 
would be the case, one of the finest fronts in the the city, there 
are some minor points that produce disappointment. 

The main cornice though good in its general proportions is 
not fashioned after the best of models ; the enrichments of 
the frieze are somewhat overcrowded — bulls heads were never 
to our liking ; and the square fronted modillions are not the 
most graceful of patterns. The recessed portion of the front, 
above the lower story, is not so well designed as the center 
and corners, the window trimmings being flat and unsatisfac- 
tory. 

The basement of such a structure as this, should, we thiuk, 
have been more solid in its appearance, and should also have 
been of granite ; but, as is usual, the proprietors have sacri- 
ficed architectural effect for the sake of large openings and 
ample light. 

With these exceptions the building shows good taste and 
ability in its designers. The pinacles over the corners are 
graceful and pleasing ; the tower is imposing though perhaps 
a trifle too large, and the pilasters with most of the details 
are well proportioned and well arranged. 

Where the architects have used the " orders," they have 
/ t abused the antique by abortive attempts at originality as 
is too often done. 

Though not to be compared to the Bank of California for 
beauty of material and workmanship, it is more creditable as 
a design, not being so strongly suggestive of buildings else- 
where. 

We think we may safely say, that when completed, it will 
be a credit to its owners and architects and an ornament to 
the city, which contains no more imposing work of architec- 
ture. In the buildings on the corner of Pine and Montgomery, 
the new color brings out many beauties of detail that were in- 
visible before, though they lack boldness and breadth of treat- 
ment ; the general effect, however, is good, much better than 
in many newer structures. 

We have not had time to give Trinity Church a careful ex- 
amination, but we observe the tower has sprouted since we saw 
i t last. We trust a spire may speedily grow from its summit- 

X. 



The Sorceress of Cordova is the title of a new spectacular 
drama, composed in Spanish by Don Aurelio Luis Gallardo, a 
Mexican poet residing in this city, and translated into English 
by Albert G. Randall, Esq., assisted by S. W. Doggett. The 
piece was read on the afternoon of the 19th instant to a 
gathering of the critics and literary men of San Francisco, 
assembled upon the invitation of the author at Martin's Res- 
taurant. We regret that we were unable to be present on this 
occasion, but according to the unanimous judgment of those 
who listened to the reading, the piece possesses rare dramatic 
and poetical merit. The scene is laid in the capital of Mexico 
and its environs, and the period is the close of the 16th 
century. 

The Grass Valley " National " devotes a column and a 
half to a notice of " May Wentworth's " " Poetry of the Pa- 
cific," which it says " is meeting with a hearty welcome in 
this portion of California." The writers mentioned with spe- 
cial commendation by the Grass Valley critic, are Edward 
Pollock, Lyman A. Goodman, Frank Soule, " Caxton," James 
Linen, W. A. Kendall, James F. Bowman, Charles Warren 
Stcddard, C. H. Webb, B. F. Washington, and Ina D. Cool- 
brith. 

" Dignity," a sketch by Prentice, will be found on another 
page of to-day's Californian. For a pungent commentary 
mpon Winwood Reade's strictures upon Du Chaillu's " Ashan- 

o-Land," see "Literary Gleanings and Gossip" on the 

ourth pagejof our present issue." 



[For the Californian.] 

SIMPKINS' TOUCHING CONFIDENCE IN NEWS- 
PAPER ADVICE. 



BY T R E M . 



u 



OF course, my dear fellow, I don't mean to say that I 
pin my faith to any newspaper in particular. I don't 
believe the political utterances of any paper infallible, but 
I always have been inclined to follow advice which I found in 
newspapers, when my common sense told me that it was purely 
disinterested." 

This is what Sirapkins said to me the other day. He had 
previously expressed his appreciation of the power of the 
Press, and declared that.he believed that error was much 
more effectively attacked by the firing in line of newspapers 
than by the volleys delivered in column by ponderous vol- 
umes. 

" I have often been mistaken," continued Simpkins, and 
have many times had reason to regret the faith I placed 
in the correctness of many of the scraps of advice which go 
the rounds of the Press. 

I was very young when I read in a newspaper a paragraph 
which stated that a man to become thoroughly well informed 
on all subjects, needed only to diligently peruse newspapers, 
and sneered at " book worms " who painfully and wearily ate 
their way through dull volumes of history, theology, etc., when 
they could find the vital essence of these volumes served up 
in an attractive form in the columns of a daily paper. I ap. 
predated the truth of this statement ; and since the day that 
paragraph fell under my notice I have read but few books. I 
Mod as much as I care to read of all new books in the reviews, 
and in fact have scarcely sufficient leisure to read all of these. 
I have acquired a fair knowledge of the history of most civil- 
ized nations by reading the historical tales published in the 
Sunday papers. I am by no means deficient in geography, 
though I owe nearly all my knowledge of that science to the 
daily papers. I find that to become a good theoretical farmer, 
it is sufficient to read every week the column headed " The 
Farm" in several of the papers for which I subscribe. I won't 
bore you by enumerating all the arts and sciences in which I 
have become tolerably expert with the sole assistance of the 
newspapers but will again express my belief that when a man 
reads his Bible, his Shakspeare, his Elegant Extracts, his 
Dictionary of Foreign Quotations, and all the daily and weekly 
papers published in this city, if he only properly digests what 
he reads, what he doesn't know isn't worth knowing." 

I rather liked Simpkins. It was far from unpleasant to find 
such a radical advocate of the value of the newspaper press. 
I assured him I was not at all bored, and asked him to con- 
tinue. He resumed his discourse : 

" There is one thing which has shaken my confidence in 
newspapers. By-theby, you never write ' Sensible Hints to 
Young Men,' ' Scraps of Advice,' ' Things Worth Knowing,' 
' Cut this out,' and all that sort of thing, do you?" 

With considerable indignation I assured Simpkins that I 
was guiltless of such foul crimes, and added that I had always 
been under the impression that the publications to which he 
alluded were written by the inmates of Asylums for Idiots as 
exercises. 

" No ?" cried Simpkins, looking grave. " Come, now, that's 
too bad. I tell you I've tried lots of those dodges. I reasoned 
that here was the wisdom of ages boiled down, crystalized and 
used to sweeten the columns of a daily paper. That belief 
has caused me trouble. I saw the other day that a raw onion 
eaten just before going to bed would cure lungs overburdened 
with oppressive and irritating matter, I thought my lungs 
were a little queer, my wife complained that I wheezed un- 
pleasantly. I ate an onion as big as my fist and went to bed 
after my wife was asleep. Soon I was awakened by a scream. 
I asked what was the matter, thought I had awakened her by 
wheezing, and said so. 

"Wheezing!" she cried, "No! Oh! you brute, you've 
been eating raw onions, I know you have. You wouldn't have 
done this before we were married." 

"Very probably not, my dear," I answered, "and possibly 
it would not at that period of our lives have been so likely to 
disturb your slumbers," I told her I did it to stop the 
wheezing, and begged her pardon, but I had to get up and 
spend an hour in washing my mouth with eau de cologne. How- 
ever, I smelled like a pole-cat all next day in spite of the per- 
fume. Now that wasn't fair." 

"Oh, that was written for the onion-eating vulgar," I an- 
swered. "You ought to have known better." 

" So I ought, that's a fact," said Simpkins. 

" I once read some moral advice, given in a jocular form," 
he continued. " It was called ' Recipes for fits." The funny 
philosopher said, 'though no doctor, he had some excellent pre- 
scriptions for fits.' This was one of them : ' For a fit of idle- 
ness, count the tickings of a clock. Do this for one hour, 
and you will be glad to pull off your coat the next, and work 
like a negro.' I was frightfully lazy the other day, and 1 
thought I'd give that a trial, for fun. I did so, and in about 
a quarter of an hour I was asleep and snoring. I did not 
j feel inclined to do any work that day. 



Then he said : ' For a fit of ambition, go into a churchyai- 
and read the gravestones. They will tell you the end of am 
bition. The grave will soon be your bed-chamber, the earth 
your pillow, corruption your father, and the worm your mother 
and sister.' That is a cheerful prescription. I so seldom have 
a fit of ambition that it was some time before I tried it. How- 
ever, when I did go into the cemetery and read the tomb- 
stones 1 had a great ambition to be lost at sea where it would 
be impossible to place a tombstone over me, and my mother 

and sister as the fellow terms the worms, couldn't get at me 

I don't believe there are worms in deep water however I 

could stand the worms after death better than I could the 
inscription on my tombstone. I cannot believe what I have 
read in the Spiritual papers about spirits upsetting tables and 
all that sort of thing. If a spirit can smash a mahogany 
table, half a dozen of them could upset a tombstone, and in 
that case I believe that there would be iconoclastic associa- 
tions formed in the "Spirit World," by those who could not rest 
in consequence of the bad taste displayed in their monuments. 

Simpkins was straying from his subjuct, and I had to recall 
him by asking, " Have you often put faith in the medical ad- 
vice given by newspapers?" 

" Have I ?" exclaimed Simpkins. " I rather think I have, 
and that I stand here alive to-day is only another proof of the 
powers of endurance possessed by the human frame. I have 
not, when afflicted with tooth ache, filled my mouth with water 
and sat on the stove till it boiled, but I have followed recipes 
almost as absurd. I read in a newspaper that a man was cured 
of rheumatism by being struck by lightning. I did not attempt 
to profit by that as I thought the treatment a little severe. I 
took a hint from another newspaper paragraph and built an 
Indian sweat house in a heap of manure in the yard, and nearly 
lost my life in consequence of my wife who declared I was a 
lunatic, having it pulled down when I was just approaching the 
crisis. 

I have placed confidence in newspaper advice, I do so still 
— in a measure — but I have suffered. Six lines in one paper 
caused me to lose eight hens and three broods of chickens ; 
a quarter of a column on the treatment of children was the 
cause of my wife leaving me, taking the children with her to 
her mother's house. It was with difficulty that I prevailed 
upon her to return. My pet dog fell a victim to a new mode 
of treatment tor the distemper, published in a morning paper 
of limited circulation. I destroyed my wife's $500 shawl by 
attempting to remove an ink stain on it with a preparation I 
had manufactured from a recipe I cut out of a paper — and 
yet," said Simpkins, appealingly, " I don't think I'm such an 
awful fool. There are so many useful things in the newspa- 
pers, and unless a man experiments a little he will never find 
out what they are worth." 

" That's very true, Simpkins," I replied, "you have." 



ITALIAN OPERA. 



THE delightful comic opera of Don Pasquale was pre- 
sented on Friday of last week, to an audience extremely 
fashionable, though not overcrowded. Signor Eugenio Bellini, 
who made his first, and thus far his only appearance, as " Don 
Pasquale," proved himself an excellent buffo, with abundant 
and appropriate action, great command of facial expression, 
and a well trained though not very powerful voice. He was 
received with considerable favor. Signorina Bellini, as 
" Norina," appeared to better advantage than before, and was 
warmly encored in Via caro sposino. her persuasive little ad- 
dress to the " Don" after their quarrel. Signor Mancusi'a 
" Doctor Malatesta" was a capital impersonation, and some 
of the dialogues between him and " Don Pasquale," display- 
ing great rapidity of utterance and high comic talent on both 
sides, were heartily enjoyed and loudly applauded. Signor 
Bianchi, as "Ernesto," was sufficiently good, though the 
character is not exactly in his line. Some of the concerted 
pieces were remarkably well done, and the whole performance 
was given with unusual finish and smoothness. 

11 Trovaiore was repeated on Saturday evening, with great 
improvement on its first representation. Signorina Brambilla, 
as Leonora," was faultless ; and Signor Limberti was once 
more in splendid voice, and acted with great spirit, as " Man- 
rico." The other parts were well done, as before, and the 
general effect was very satisfactory. 

Un Ballo in Maschera, always a favorite opera, drew im- 
mense houses on Monday and Wednesday evenings, and was 
in many respect the most creditable performance yst given by 
this troupe. It was put upon the stage with less expense 
than during the last season, and the masquerade scene, in par- 
ticular, had a meagre and shabby look, not very complimen- 
tary to such a brilliant and remunerative audience. The mu 
sic, however, was rendered throughout with fine effect. Si|>- 
noiina Brambilla was admirable as " Amelia," and Signor 
Limberti almost equally so as " Ricardo ;" Mme. Stella Bon- 
heur's acting was full of significance, and ber singing almost 
faultless as " Ulrica ;" and Signor Mancusi was really 
magnificent as " Renato." The part of the " Page," in 
which Adelaide Phillips made such a hit, was prettilf 
sung by. Signorina Bellini, whose youth and di a " 
dence compel the audience to overlook the exce , - iv ® 
tameness in her acting. She will do better after some/ ea ^ 
experience ; meantime she has our best wishes, and '"' e ena '' 
rejoice to seo and record her improvement. The. d ri ' s an <* 
orchestra were generally good, the latter ^'^^"^j-if 
in the masquerade scene supported by the S' rtillery 

^LaFavorita was produced last night, ^ ^ f ""7 
noticed in our next issue. 11 Trovator™** ^eated this 
evening. / Marliri is announced fc *' 



10 



The Calilornian. 



Bat the cabin of a ferry boat is hardly the place for outward 
manifestations of ecstatic sentiment, and I dare say our fellow 
voyagers acros3 the way overheard our conversation without 
discovering that either of us was different from ordinary mor- 
tals. In the words of somebody or other in Mother Goose's 
dramas, it was, " How do you do, and how do you do, and 
how do you do again," and then it was : 

" But how in the name of wonder came you here, and where 
did you come from ?" 

" Why, I have been to "Washington, to see the opening of 
Congress and visit my cousius, and am on my way home. But 
how came you here?" 

My own story need not be recapitulated ; bat it3 main fact, 
tba*, I was bound to Boston and on the same train with her- 
self elicited an " Oh, how nice," that was the sweetest music 
and the most exquisite poetry to my ears. Of course I took 
possession of the satchel, water-proof, checks, ticket and other 
impedimenta of my fair fellow traveler at once, with the air 
of a regularly-appointed guardian. A glance at the long 
series of coupons which formed the ticket, however, reminded 
me that of course Miss Burton was ticketed through to Bos- 
ton, and that her natural means of crossing the metropolis was 
by the lumbering coach which stood before us as we quitted 
the ferry-boat, and into which an unsavory Irishwoman with 
half a dozen whimpering children, was already crowding her 
way. 

" Oh, Sallie," said I, with a sudden inspiration, whether of 
good or evil I have never yet quite decided, " Let us not 
ride in that disagreeable thing. We can easily walk to Broad- 
way, and take a car, and then we can stop and take breakfast 
at some better place than those horrible restaurants near the 
depot." 

" Certainly, I had just as lief, if you think it would be 
pleasanter, Mr. Delton," said she, without a moment's hesita- 
tion. " I suppose there is plenty of time, and I am sure I am 
hungry." 

I believe Sallie thought I was moody and offended duriug 
that walk through Courtland street, because she had called 
me by my surname ; but I hardly noticed the lapse, for the 
memory of the state of my pocket, forgotten in the sound 
sleep and sudden surprise, just then struck me, as it were, be- 
tween the eyes ; and none of the mental arithmetic I could 
muster could create a satisfactory example with the materials 
I had at command. Six more cents out of my ninety, for a 
double car fare, left only seventy-eight for the day's provis- 
ion lor two people, putting the longed-for newspaper out of 
the question as an unjustifiable luxury ! and though such a 
sum might be an abundance in Pekin, with my knowledge of 
New York restaurants and railway dining rooms, I could not 
contrive a practicable way of making the two ends meet. 

Some matter-of-fact reader may growl that of course the 
young lady had money enough, and that all I had to do was to 
borrow a few dollars of her for a day and be at once relieved 
of all anxiety. But I think those who have been in the same 
peculiar condition of miud and heart that I was in then, feel- 
ing as I did that a most momentous crisis was near at 
hand, will admit that such a course of procedure was quite 
out of the question. I was uot sure enough of ray fate to 
venture any risks however slight, and the risk implied to my 
mind, in confiding to the being who held my happiness in her 
hands, that I was two hundred miles from home with only 
ninety cents in available funds, would have been fatal to all 
my hopes of success. 

No ; the exigency of the hour demanded a conception and 
execution almost Napoleonic ; and by the time we had reached 
Broadway I was ready for the test. 

" I think, Sallie," said I, as cool as I had seen General 
Burnside forty-eight hours before, on the hill overlooking 
Fredericksburg, " I think on the whole we had better break- 
fast at the Astor House. It is qaite near, very comfortable, 
and you will have a chance to get thoroughly warmed before 
taking the horse-car." 

Sallie called me by my Christian name again as she assented 
joyfully to the proposal, and the conversation glided off into 
a track where I need not to follow it. The sun was hardly up, 1 
remember, and none of the stores in that part of Broadway 
would take down their shutters for an hour or more. The 
newsmen rushing by with damp bundles of papers, and the 
hacks driving to and from the early boats and trains were 
about the only occupauts of the street ; and Sallie thought it 
very different from the Broadway she had known in her visits 
to New York, and worth being out at that unearthly hour to 
see as a novelty. At length we reached Yesey street, and as 
we turned the corner I think my heart beat faster that it had 
■v^er done in any of the perilous positions of my war experi- 
en \ Suppose the door of the ladies' entrance should be 
lockev a t t),i 3 ear iy period of the day ; or suppose we should 
be met » tne Dea( i 0 j t ne stairs by a polite waiter? In either 
case I thin, j sn0 uld rather have been in even General Burn- 
side 8 boots ti >n m [ ne tba.t morning. But no uutoward inci- 
dent overthrew ^scheme at its beginning ; we entered, ran 
up the stairs, and \j n out meeting an inquisitive eye crossed 
the hall into the littfevception room where a jolly fire already 



burned in the grate, and gave Sallie an opportunity to doff her 
overshoes and warm her pretty feet in the most enchanting 
way imaginable. 

Of course I left her, ostensibly to report myself at the office ; 
and of course I did Dot go near the office, but made a hasty 
toilet in the wash-room, including renovation to the extent of 
a clean paper color from the recesses of one of my pockets. 
I needed the splash of the cold water to dispel the nervous- 
ness which kept creeping over me when I thought of the 
dangers of my position and the immensity of the interests at 
stake. I think I would have given a slice of my reputation to 
have met any of my newspaper friends in the family lobby, with 
five dollars in his pockets ; but journalists are not abroad so 
late in the morning as balf-past six, and no such means of re- 
lief was to be hoped for. I would have pawned my watch will- 
ingly or sold it for one-tenth its value with absolute pleasure ; 
but neither my uncle nor the jewelers open their doors till 
eight at least. We bad time enough, but none to spare ; so 
I braced myself with bold resolution, assumed as much of the 
air of an established guest as possible, and sauntered back to 
the reception room where Sallie was waiting in the firelight, 
leaning her head on her hand in the prettiest attitude of fatigue 
and meditation in the world. She donned again her outer 
garments briskly, I shouldered overcoat and minor luggage, 
and we marched, she as innocent as a lark, and as gay, and I 
weighed down with apprehension and suspense, into the cosy 
little breakfast room. 

Nobody stepped up to question my right "there : the waiter 
designated a table for U3 as a matter of course, and evidently 
took ns, as I meant he should, for guests of yesterday, com- 
pelled to an early breakfast on account of departure in the 
morning train. There was one such party in the room already, 
eating bonneted and shawled and with nervous glances at the 
clock. The fires slowed in the two grates with a cheerful 
lustre, and the screens before them, serving also as heaters 
for the rolls and plates, reminded me of the tin-kitchens of 
my boyhood days. We had a table to ourselves in one corner. 
Sallie clapped her hands joyously, and said it was splendid ; 
and we combined to order such a breakfast as might have sug- 
gested to the waiter that we were ju3t from a journey, and 
not just starting out. I remember I sent the waiter off with 
a bit of currency to buy me a morning's Herald, quite as 
much to add an air of luxury to our repast as to reassure my- 
self that no New York newspaper man had stolen a march 
upon me by a balloon or serial telegraph with an account of 
the battle. There was only a half column of sensational 
headings and a few confused lines of contradictory statements 
vaguely shadowing forth the defeat. My newspaper triumph 
was certain, and with it I felt assured of a promotion and an 
established reputation in my profession, which would give me 
the right to ask Sallie the question to which I fancied her 
eyes had already said yes. 

It was a most bewitching breakfast. With youth and health 
and love and novelty to season our viands, there was no sickly 
sentimentalism about our appetites. Mine had the added 
stimulus of the remembrance of six months' campaign fare in 
Yirginia and Maryland ; but I think we both enjoyed the feast 
about alike, and shared each other's steaks, cutlets, omelets, 
chicken-wings and successive plates of smoking, luscious cakes, 
at a merry mood of rivalry and comparison. True, to me it 
bad some of the elements of Macbeth's feast ; as a step re- 
sounded in the corridor, I fancied my Banquo in the shape of 
the gentlemanly clerk, comiDg to ask me to " call at the office 
and register ;" like the Egyptian I had a griuning skull at my 
banquet in the ebony waiter who might ask me atany moment 
for the number of my room ; and when the closet door opened 
I conjured up a skelton in the shape of a curt detective who 
might take me off to the Tombs as a new edition of Jeremy 
Didler, with my delayed dispatch in my pocket, and Sallie in 
tears of wrath. With such thoughts constantly popping up, 
the words of adoration, of entreaty, which kept rising to my 
lips as 1 looked across the table at the dainty form opposite, 
had to be resolutely repressed, for should any of these interrup- 
tions occur, I thought how speedily would the tenderness that 
datced in Sallie s eyes turn to flashing scorn, how dark would 
be the prospect otherwise so bright before me. 

But the meal, with all its delights and all its terrors, came 
to an end at last ; we had still more than half an hour to 
reach the New Haven station ; and I breathed a sigh of re- 
lief as the waiter helped me on with my overcoat as obsequi- 
ously as if 1 had been Mr. Astor himself, with a check for a 
million in my pocket, in place of that wretched ninety cents. 
I wouW have given him half my cash as a fee, in my joy, but 
that I feared to expose the emptiness of my pocket book. 
We passed down the stairs unmolested as we had come up, 
followed by the bona fide departiug guests who had break- 
fasted near us, and who had a carriage waiting for tbem at 
the door. Wo made our way to the horse-car, which at that 
early hour for up-town travel we had nearly to ourselves, and 
arrived at 'Twenty-seventh street in ample time for the eight 
o'clock Boston trara*- 

It may be imagined that with the weight of my rash ex- 
periment off my miud, and Sallie's pretty head occasionally 



resting on my shoulder, with the horrors of the defeat growing 
dim, and the consciousness that I had distanced all the press 
of the east in speed that morning, and should beat them in 
minuteness and accuracy of detail the next, I soon recovered 
my natural spirits. I saw no longer any reason for delaying 
my own attack upon the fortress I had beseiged so long. I 
opened my fir3F parallel at Bridgeport, began the assault in 
earnest at New Haven, carried the citadel long before we 
reached Hartford, and fired a salute of victory in the next 
tunnel. We mutually celebrated the triumph in another 
way at Springfield, where a judicious expenditure of my re- 
maining seventy cents procured a lunch of wholesome-New 
England viands quite as liberal in quantity as our hearty 
breakfast bad left us an appetite for. But it was Dot till long 
after that that I told Sallie the secret of our Astor House 
feast, and how when I gave her up temporarily to her 
father in the depot that night, I walked to the office with 
hardly money enough to jingle in my pocket. 

Of course, in the happy years that have followed, I have 
felt an occasionally twinge of honorable remorse, as I thought 
of the contemptible way in which I had swindled the Astor 
House. I did indeed contemplate explaining the whole affair 
at the office when I next passed through New York ; but 
when I came to the test, the stately severity of the clerk's 
manner quite froze me with dismay at the thought of such 
a confession to such a man, and I only asked him to give me 
the key of my room. So absurd an idea as sending the 
amount of which I had defrauded the establishment in an 
anonymous letter, as people are constantly sending such mis- 
sives to the Treasury Department, was not to be thought of. 
I strove to make such reparation as I could by always slaying 
at the house when I visited New York — never again with 
empty pockets ; bnt then I have reflected that the thorough 
comfort and homelike atmosphere of the place would have in- 
duced this choice in any other circumstances, and so I have 
decided to ease my conscience by a sort of public confession , 
and have therefore put faithfully down in black and white the 
whole story of the first time my wife and I ever breakfasted 
together at the Astor House. — Boston Saturday Gazette. 



Artificial Flowers. — Ladies who deck their hair with 
mimic bloom, have, in general, little idea of the way in which 
those false flowers grow. They wear them, light-hearted, in 
the gayest of 6cenes, and think not that they are transplanted 
from the saddest. They put forth their leaves and delicate 
hues in stifling garrets, in fetid back kitchens, or in hot, over- 
crowded factories, where the gas-burners are often without 
glass or shade, and gas-stoves are set on the table to heat the 
tools, while a huudred women and girls, from nine years./>ld 
and upwards, bend over their hot-house plants. Some hold 
the hand stamp, which cuts through sixteen folds at a time of 
the muslin or silk that is to make the leaves and flowers. 
Others vein the leaves by pressing them between dies, or paint 
the petals separately with a brush when the center is to be 
left white. Most of them are busy with the finer work of 
constructing the flowers. They gum and wax, dust for bloom 
with potato flour, or with blown glass powder for frost ; they 
twist paper or silk thread to the stalk, and mako the founda- 
tion on which the petals stick. Slender wires are run 
through the blossoms, and a small goffering iron gives them 
their curl. All this is strange and fidgety work, especially by 
gas-light, with blistered fingers, thumb-nails worn to the 
quick, and the dust of paint and other material inflaming 
the eyes, and preparing patients for the Opthalinic Hospital. 
The blue and carmines try the sight sadly, and the latter causes 
heaviness in the head. Arsenic green and verdigris blue 
are seldom used ; but enough is left to poison the poor 
" flower girl's " existence. She works in Loudon fourteen 
or fifteen hours a day, and sometimes longer. Alter thir- 
teen hours' work, girls often take home sufficient for two 
hours more. 

The Best. — Mr. Charles S. Westcott, of Elizabeth, N. J. 
who is well acquainted with the leading sewiDg machines, 
states : " I think the Grover Sc. Baker is be3t adapted to family 
use, for the reason that it is the most easily kept in order, and 
makes a stitch which does not wear itself in two by the direct 
strain of the threads upon each other. I have had a shuttle 
or lock-stitch machine in use in my family, and abandoned it 
because it was more difficult for a woman to keep it in order, 
and because the seam made by it would in a short time rip in 
separate places by the wearing of the threads upon each 
other." 

[From testimony taken be/ore the U. S. Commissioner oj 
Patents, on the opplication for the extension of the patent 
for the Grover k Baker Seizing Machine.} 

Carlotta Fatti has increased in favor with the musical 
people abroad. Ullman has commenced a second tour with 
her. The first concert, in Nemes, brought in over six thou- 
sand francos. If she were not lame, she would be very suc- 
cessful in opera. The artificial application to hide her de- 
formity does Lot work well. 

A soi.ntER saves bis own life bj slaying his enemies. He 
kills for a living. 



The Californian 



It 



Absconded I — The wife whose husband supposed she had 
absconded was freely forgiven, when he found she had 
only been down to tUo NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH GAL- 
LERY to see HOWLAND, and get one dozen of those beau- 
tiful Card Pictures, THE BEST ever made in this city. 
Come early, if you waut to get a sitting. Remember the 
Place — Nos. 25 and 27 Third street, east side, near Market 
street B. F. HOWLAND, Artist 



Mayer's Bazaar. — R. Mayer offers at his Bazaar, corner 
Pine and Montgomery streets, the greatest variety of jew- 
elry, watches, silver plated ware, guitars, music boxes; 
concertinas, accordeous, opera glasses, etc., etc., to the 
public of San Francisco, and to the country trade, at prices 
that defy competition, and Is determined to close out bis 
present stock at greatly reduced rates. His heavy case 
sliver watches from the American Watch Company are 
superior to anything ever before offered to the public. 
These watches are takiDg the place of heavy gold watches' 
from the fact that the workmanship is superior, the cas- 
ings pure silver, and the prices low. The sale of these 
watches is very extensive on the Pacific coast. Another 
proof thai American manufactures can beat the world. 
The works are made of platiua and never get out of re- 
pair. French opera glasses oC great power for sale or 
hire, and all kinds of musical instruments, eight day fam- 
ily clocks, etc. This is a rare chance to invest your money 
to advantage, at Mayer's Bazaar, sontheast corner of 
Montgomery and Pine streets. 

N. B. An immense assortment of Japanese curiosities 

for sale. 



"WAGONS. 



MILLS & EVANS, IMPORTERS OF THOROUGH-BRACE 
Wagons, light express, two and three spring Wagons, 
suitable for milk-men and furniture dealers, and others 
wishing light and durable Wagons. Their Wagons are 
made expressly for the California market, and Mills & 
Evans' is the only firm which receives Wagons from the 
celebrated manufactory of A. W. Sanborn k Co., Man- 
chester, N. H. This latter firm stands A No. 1 in the 
east, and their wagons have stood the test of our Califor- 
nia climate, and are sold by Mills & Evans fifty per cent, 
lower than any other establishment on the Pacific coast. 
Call and examine their Wagons, at No. 587 Market street, 
opposite the Metropolitan market, * 



Medical — "Yooxg Man's Fbiend and Protector," an 
Association for beneficent objects, Young men should 
inform themselves in relation to it, and by applying to, 
the Actuary, Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple, Post street, 
they will be furnished with Prospectus. 



&g- WONDERFUL BUT TRUE. — MADAME REMING- 
ton, the world-renowned Astrologistand Somnambulistic 
Clairvoyant, while in a clairvoyant state, delineates tho 
very features of the person you are to marry, and by 
the aid of an instrument of intense power, known as 
the Psychomotrope, guarantees to produce a perfect and 
lilo like picture of tho future husband or wife of the 
applicant, with date of marriage, .occupation, leading 
traits of character, etc. This is no imposition, as testi- 
monials without number can assert. By stating place 
of btrth, age, disposition, color of eyes and hair, and en- 
closing fifty cents and stamped envelope addressed to 
yourself, you will receive toe picture by return mail, 
together with desired information. 

Address in confidence, Madame Gertrude Remington, 
P. 0. Box 297, West Troy, N. Y. 



MEDICAL ADVICE. 
Dr. Wm. K. Doherty's Medical and Surgical 
Institute is becoming a sine qua non to the welfare 
of our State and health of our citizens ; aud his 
rapidly spreading reputation, although it may excite 
surprise, is but the signal of skill, and follows as the 
natural effect of such a cause. We are personally 
acquainted with gentlemen who bad suffered for 
years under chronic disease, and who bad taken ad- 
vantage of every available means that promised 
relief, but without success, until they called upon 
Dr. Doberty, who, in au incredibly short space of 
time, has given them entire relief. It is gratifying 
to announce this fact, because the Doctor is a gentle- 
man who seeks, not by defamation of others, to es- 
tablish his reputation, or to rear the superstructure of 
his own upon the ruin of another's fame. The Doc- 
tor conducts his Institute in a manner that must be 
gratifying to all his patients. He examines, hears, 
advises, and recommends, without charge, aud the 
patient, after hearing his terms for treatment, can 
accept or reject at pleasure. In no case does the 
Doctor make a charge unless he effects a cure. This 
be is able to do, because he feels the confidence 
which long experience has given, and no doubt the 
consolation which appertains to that confidence. 
Persons afflicted with either acute or chronic disease, 
would do well to consult the Doctor ; at all events, 
it can do no harm, as for consultation he asks no fee ; 
nor does he iusist on obedience to his advice unless 
the patient places himself under his care. His offices 
are on Sacramento street, opposite the Pacific Mail 
Steamship office.— San Francisco News. 

J-JROOKLYN HOTEL, 

1852. SAN FRANCISCO. 1866. 

The Proprietor of the above-named Hotel wishes 
to inform his patrons and the Travelling Public that he 
has opened that elegant Brick Fireproof Hotel, on tho 

S. E. Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, 

With all the modern conveniences attached to it. 

Gas and water aro supplied throughout tho House. The 
Rooms are welt ventilated, and the Public will find in this 
Hotel all the comforts of a home. The Hotel is spacious, 
and well adapted for the use of Families. 8uits of Rooms 
can be had on reasonable terms. 

A Large Reading Room is attached to the Hotel, 

Containing 500 Volumes of Standard Works, 

Which is entirely for the use of patrons. 
THE CITY COACH, with the name of the Hotel on it, 
will he in readiness at the Wharf, on the arrival of each 
Steamer, to convey passengers n.nd baggage to tho Hotel, 
free of charge. JOHN KELLY, Jr., Proprietor. 

y^M. 0. BREYFOGLE. 

(Successor to WARE & MOSHER,) 
NO. 26 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
Manufacturer and Dealer in 

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS & SHUTTERS, 

From K iln-Driod Lumber — at the Lowest Rates. 
Orders from the country will receive prompt attention 



JL^OYSl BOIS! BOYS! 

NOW IS THE TIME 
H. M. LOCKWOOD & CO., 
New No. 624) CLAY STREET, (Old No 

Have received a Large Stock of 

GENTS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

— AND — 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

Which they are selling 

AT VERY LOW PRICES. 
Every Garment warranted. All are invited to call 
examine our goods. 

H. M. LOCKWOOD & CO. 

624 Clay street, San Francisco 



RADICAL CURE TRUSSES ! 

LADIES' SUPPORTERS 

Shoulder Braces, etc., 




iited, and relief warranted 
AT 



GEORGE TIEMAN'S & C O.'S 

NEW YORK BRANCH 
Surgical and Dental Instrument Depot, 
No. 218 MONTGOMERY STREET, San Francisco, Cal., 
(Opposite the Russ' House,) 

J. H. A. FOLKERS. Sole Agent. 
Also keeps Ear Trumpets for the Deaf, Elastic Stockings 
for Enlarged Veins, etc., Baunseheidt's Rheumatism In 
strument, Magentic Electro Machines, etc* 



M 



ARTIN'S RESTAURANT, 

623 COMMERCIAL STREET 

Above Montgomery. Meals at all hours. 
The bpst of Wines, Oysters, Game, and all 
the delicacies of the season always on hand 
Private Saloons up stairs for Dinner and'' 
Supper Parties. LEON DfNGEON, Proprietor. 



•fJALIFOKMA 

COFFEE AND DINING SALOON, > 
(Formerly the German Coffee Salo*n,)I 

NOS. 612 AND 014 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Between Clay and Merchant, San Francisco. 
J. R. REAGAN Proprietor 

This house has undergone a thorough change, both in 
MANAGEMENT and PRICES. A fine Ladies' Saloon has 
been fitted up in the rear, where private parties can re- 
ceive every attention in the mo ; t comfortable quarters. 
We also keep lunch hot on chating dishes at the counter, 
including the fluest of Pastry, where customers can be 
served quickly and satisfactorily. 

French Breakfasts and Dinners, with Wine, continued 



BONZI&CO., 

Italian Restaurant, 

515 Merchant street, opposite Washington Market, between 
Montgomery and Sansorao streets, San Francisco. 

MEALS, WITH WINE, 50 CENTS. 

THE CHOICEST COMMODITIES OF THE 
Market served up iu the best style of Italiau 
aud French cookery. 

Oq tho second floor are numerous private, 

rooms, for social or private DINNERPARTIES, 
chocolate, Wine, Beer, Liqueurs, with every description 
of edible accompaniments, served to order at any hour of 
the dqy or evening. 



REMOVED 

To 645 Clay street, a few doors below Kearny. 

DR. BLAKE CAN NOW BE FOUND AT 
the above location . Engagements as usual 
can be made with all those who desire thor- 
ough aim FIRST CLASS GOLD FILIJNGS. 




Lamott's Hat Emporium 

IS THE PLACE TO GET A FASHIONABLE 

HAT OR CAP, 

AND AT PRICES 25 PER CENT. LESS THAN 
ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THIS CITY. 

Do not fail to have one of 

LAMOTT'S HATS! 

CORNER PINE AND MONTGOMERY STREETS. 



ALTER S. PIERCE, 

i,rg".j, j.ljLya Manufacturer and Importer of 

pffl PIANO-FORTES. 

FACTORY AND WAREROOM, NO. 536 MARKET 
Street, opposite Second. 

PIANOS TO RENT.-©* 

WALTER "sTpIERCE'S 

Piano Manufactory 

Is the most complet; on th-: Pacific Coist, havin g every 
appliance of machinery for Making or REPAIRING Pianos 
to be found in the largest Eastern Factories - 

Old Pianos converted into new, by puttiug in new inte- 
rior mechanism complete. 



THE FAMOUS 

P I A N O S 



Chickering & Son 

Havo received tho endorsement of all the leading Artistes 
of Europe and America. Testimonials to boston at the 
Agents'. 

Pianos to rent, from $5 to $10. Tuning free. 

KOULER, CHASE & CO., 

421 Montgomery street. 




TOWNE & BACON, 
Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 
Than other offices 
,In this City, 
Try them 
'With a Job, 
And you will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their office is at 536 
Clay St., below Montgom'y, 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 



536 



Edward Bosqui & Co., 

Printers, 

And Blank Book Manufacturers, 
517 CLAY STREET, 

Between Montgomery and Sansome StS., 
San Francisco. 



gTERETT & CUBERT, 

PRINTERS, 

533 Clay street, San Francisco. 

B. F. STERETT WM. M. CUBERY 

We are prepared to execute in a prompt and satisfac- 
tory manner, all kinds of Book, Job and Card Printing ; 
also, Blank Books manufactured and Paper Ruled to 
order. 



POR POSTERS, HANDBILLS, 

AND 

Show Work of All Kinds, 

GO TO THE 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING HOUSE 

OP 

FRANCIS & VALENTINE, 

517 Clay street, and 510, 512 and 614 Commercial street 



jy O YOU WANT ANY 

PRINTING? 

IF YOU DO, GO TO 

411 CLAY STREET, 

BETWEEN SANSOME AND BATTERY. 



Printing of every description done on 

short notice and in the best style, by 

M. D. CARR & CO. 



San Francisco Mill. 



HOBBS, GILMORE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

BOXES, 

Market Street, between Beale and Main, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



For Sale, Mahogany, Spanish Cedar, and other Fancy 
Wood?. 



)>. A. MACDONALD 
J. H. MACDONALD 



f J. MCC. 

\ u. enr 



1IX, 

cnirsiAN. 



D. A. MACDONALD & CO., 
SAWING AND PLANING MILLS, 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
DOORS, SASHES, BLINDS AND MOULDINGS, 

Corner o f Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Finishing Work for Buildings constantly on hand, 
and got up to order. 



W. N. 5in.LKK J. r. HALEY. 

jyjILLER & HALEY, 

EMPIRE STEAM MILLS, 

NO. 29 FREMONT STREET, 
San Francisco. 
SASH, BLIND, DOOR AND MOULDING FACTORY. 



piONEER IRON SHUTTER WORKS. 
Established 1849. 

John Upstone, 

MANUFACTURER OF FIRE-PROOF 

Doors and Shutters, 

Bank Vaults, Balconies, Gratings, Prison Cells 
Awnings, Stairs, Iron Fence, etc., 
Corner of California and Drnram Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Constantly on hand a largo assortment of second 
hand Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters. to u 



J H. SMALL, 

Machine Shop, 

BUILDER OF 
Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, 
Also, I. H. Small's Patent Boot Screwing Machine. 
Gears of all kinds Cut at Short Notice, 
And at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
Repairing of all kinds done with Promptness and Dispatch. 

Corner of Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



n s Z™' } HANSCOM & C04 1 *f D ™<^T. 

u. H. SMITH. ) " ~ \ W. W. HANSCOM. 

Etna Iron Works! 

S. E. corner Fremont aud Tehama Streets, San Francisco, 
Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QUARTZ-MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, SAW- 
MILLS, FLOOR-MILLS, 
Dunbar's Improved Self- Adjusting 
PISTON PACKING, 
Now so extensively used in the East aud in this State. 
Requires no springs or screws ; is always steam-light ; 
without excessive lrictiou, and never gets slack or leaky. 

HANSCOM'S CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind now in use in this State or anywhere 
else. All kinds of GRINDERS and AMALGAMATORS 
made to order. Manufacture) s of tho new Prospecting 
Quartz-Mills, consisting of Boiler, Engine, 2-stamp Bat- 
tery and Grinding and Amalgamating Pan, complete, for 
working from one ton per day upwards. Drawings are 
furnished witb each of these mills, so that any competent 
engineer can set it up in running order in two days' time. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER-WHEEL, 
Giving greater power at lower cost than any wheel in use. 

Send for one of our circulars giving full tables. 

All Wheels warranted to give the Power as set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

SOLE MAKERS FOR THIS COAST OF THE " PENDER - 
GAST WHITE IRON STAMP frHOES AND DIES." 
None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 
at market prices. Particular attention given to drawings 
and specifications ot machinery, wnicu will be made to 
order. The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited. 

tO, Particular attention paid to HOUSE WORK and 
ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS. 



THEODORE KALLENBERG, 

No. 416 Market street, - - - San Francisco, 

Machinist, 

Maker of Models for Inventors, Drawing Instruments, 
Small Machines, Philosophical Iustrumcnts, Scales and 
Weights, all kinds of Brass and Iron Work- 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



rpHE CALIFORNIA 

Building and Savings Bank, 

CALIFORNIA ST., ONE DOOR FROM SANSOME. 
Capital ami Deposits, - - - - - $600,000 

WHICH IS LOANED ON PROPERTY. 

LOANS MADE on CITY REAL ESTATE, 
HOUSES, SHIPS, FACTORIES 
AND MERCHANDISE. 

Deposits received at one per cent, per month. 

M^ney transmitted from the interior, by Express or 
Mail, passed to interest from the day of arrivai, and a 
Certificate returned in course of post. 

Strangers may deposit Bonds, Gold Dust, Coin, or Valu- 
able Papers in the Vault, for long or short periods, at a 
small ret t, for which valuables the Compan" will be 
accountable, THOMAS MOONEY, President. 



He 



rpHE SIGN OF THE BIG GLOVE. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 
25 Post street, between Montgomery aud Kearny streets. 

J. F. SNOW, THE " GLOVE MAN," CLEANS 
Furs without removing the lining. All kinds of/ 
Dresses — including Sta^re and Party Dresses— 
WITHOUT RIPPING. Woolen Goods, Shaw Is, Bucl. 
and Kid Gloves, Buck Undcrvests, Feathers, etc., etc. 
dyes Kid Gloves and Feathers. 

RING'S VEGETABLE AMBROSIA FOR THE HAIR FOR 
SALE. 

QANTY & WAGNER, 

(SUCCESSORS TO J. REGAN,) 

113 Montgomery street, bet. Push and Sutler 

N. B— All candies sold by us are warranted to be man' 
ufactured from Stewart's double refined Sugar, and to bo 
equal to any manufactured in the State. Country mcr 
chants solicited to examine our stock and prices. Goodi 
delivered to any part of tho city tree of charge. 



12 



The Californian 



DIDN'T KNOW. 

He gave me a knife one day at school, 

Four-bladed, the handle of pear!— 
And great black words on the wrapper said 

" For the darlingest little girl." 
I was glad ! Oh, yes, the crimson blood 

To my young cheek came and went, 
And my heart thumped wondronsly pit-a-pat, 

Bat I didn't know what it meant. 

One night he said I must jump on his sled, 

For the snow was falling fast ; 
I was half-afraid, but he coaxed and coaxed, 

And got me on at last, 
laughing and chatting in merry glee, 

To my home bis course he bent, 
And my sisters looked at each other and smiled, 

But I didn't know what it meant. 

The years passed on, and they touched his eye 
With a shadow of deeper blue ; 

They gave to his form a manlier grace- 
To bis cheek a swarthier hue. 

We stood by the dreamily rippling brook, 
When the day was almost spent, 

His whispers were soft as the lullaby ; 

And NOW I KNOW WHAT IT MEANT ! 



Mind and Muscle.— Brown, who has been 
editing a weekly paper at a small town in an 
adjoining State for some time past, went 
through here a few days ago, on his way to 
New Orleans in search of employment. Smith 
met him in the reading-room of the hotel just 
before he left here, and asked him how he 
happened to abandon his paper. 

"You see," said Brown, "Green and I 
started the thing in copartnership, and as he 
is nothing of a writer, it was agreed between 
us that I should edit the paper, and he should 
do the pres3-work, etc. This arrangement 
struck me alter a while as being unfair, so I 
said to Green one day, " Green, I don't like 
the way the work in this office is divided. I 
think that inasmuch as you merely work with 
your muscle, while I work with my brain, you 
ought to allow me a little bigger share of the 
profits. Brains ought always to command a 
higher price than muscle." 

" All that may be true," said Green, " but 
look here, Brown, considering the large amount 
of muscle I've got and the very small amount 
of brains you've got, I don't think you have 
any right to say a word." 

"After that," continued Brown, "I felt 
that in justice to myself I couldn't associate 
on equal terms with Green any longer, and so 
I sold out my interest in the concern and left." 

The editor of the Woonsocket Patriot 
makes merry over the mistake of an old 
Shanghai hen of his that had been " setting " 
for five weeks upon two round stones and a 
brick! "Her anxiety," quoth he "is no 
greater than ours, to know what she will hatch. 
If it proves a brickyard, that hen i3 not for 
sale." 

" I love to look upon a young man. There 
is a hidden potency concealed within his breast 
which charms and pains me." The daughter 
of a clergyman happening to find the above 
sentence at the close of her father's manu- 
script, as he had left it in his study, sat down 
and added : " Them's my sentiments exactly, 
papa, excepting the 'pains.'" 

Almost every young lady is public spirited 
enough to have her father's house used as a 
court house. 

Few ladie3 are so modest as to refuse to sit 
in the lap of luxury. 



JkJATHANIEL GRAY & CO., 
UNDERTAKERS, 
CITY AND COUNTY SEXTON, 
641 Sacramento street, Corner of Webb 



Sole agents for BARSTOW'S PATENT METALLIC 
I BURIAL CASES and CASKETS. 



PHILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

Jorner Se-juJ *ad Fo^om streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

HOELSCHER &. WIELAND, 

Proprietors 




. TOC r t>ALB HOUSE, 

b Corner Main and O ik streets, Petaluma' 

H. STOCKDALE Proprietor 



THE GREAT 

New England Remedy! 

Dr. J. W. "POLAND'S 

White - Pine Compound, 

IS NOW OFFERED TO THE AFFLICTED THROUGH- 
out the country, after having been proved by the test of 
eleven years in the New England States, where its merits 
have become as well known as the tree iroin which, in 
part, it derives its virtues. 

THE WHITE-PINE COMPOUND CURES i 
Sore Throat, Colds, Coughs, Diptheria, Bron- 
chitis, Spitting of Blood, and Pulmonary 
Affections generally. It is a remarkable 
Remedy for Kidney Complaints, Diabetes, 
Difficulty of Avoiding Urine, Bleeding from 
the Kidneys and Bladder, Gravel, and other 
Complaints. For Files and Scurvy it will 
be found very valuable. 

Give it a Trial, if you would learn the 

value, of a Good and Tried Medicine. 

It is pleasant, safe and sure. Sold by all Druggists and 
Dealers in Medicine generally. 

HOSTETTER, SMITH & DEAN, 
401 and 403 Battery Street, cor. Clay, San Francisco 




MASONIC TEMPLE. 

Montgomery and Post streets, San Francieco. 
TO THE SICK'! 

Cures Without Medicines. 

Experience of 25 years [15th (1866) in San Francisco,] 
enables DR. BOURNE to Guarantee Cures I He perf.'rms 
all he promises — more, if possible. Consultations Free. 
Call or send for circulars. 

10 MASONIC TEMPLE, POST STREET. 



FINIGAN'S 




NORFOLK STABLES, 

ELLIS STREET, BETWEEN POWELL AND MASON, 
SA15 FRANCISCO. 
THE FINEST STABLE KNOWN IN AMERICA. 

Hor-es, Buggies, and all kinds of Carriages to let on rea- 
sonable terms Partirular attention paid to boarding 
horses. Ladies' and Gentlemen's Saddle Horses always 
on hand. P. A. FINIGAN, Proprietor. 



BEDDING AND FURNITURE, 
LIVE GEESE FEATHERS, 
DOWNY PULU, CURLED HAIR, MOSS, AND 
WOOL MATTRESSES. 

— ALSO — 

The sole right to manufacture FiLi.ra's Patent Sfirai. 
Spuing Mattbes^es, admitted by everybody to be the 
be-st, more durable, more elastic, and cheaper than the 
old style Spring Beds. 

A full assortment of Furniture, Sheeting, Blankets, 
etc., at extremely low prices, for cash. 

JACOB SCHREIBER, 
Nos. 131 and 133 SansGme street, between Bush and 
Pine, Ban Francisco. 



■yy E. GOLDSMITH, 

Practical Card and Seal Engraver, 
AND PLATE PRINTER, 
No. 505 Montgomery 6treet, over Tucker's. 



JJOAGLAND & NEWSOM 
ARCHITECTS, 

Southwest corner Sacramento and Kearny streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



B 



OWMAN 6c CO., 

Dealers in fctoves and Tin Ware. 

Mam street, Petaluma. 



j^OYNIHAN & AITKIN, 

Portland Boiler Works, 

311 AXD 313 MISSION STREET, 
Between Bealc and Fremont streets, *au Francisco. 



Manufacturers of Steam Boilers, high or low presBiire— 
Cylinder, Tubular or Flue; Sheet Iron Work; Steam and 
Water Pipe of the best quality, and at morv reasonable 
prices than any other establishment on the PanOc Coast. 

Being Practical Boiler Makers, of loDg experience, con- 
fining our whole time and attention to our branch of bus- 
iness, and having enlarged our works, and also added the 
most improved tools in the country, we are enabled to 
turn out Boilers more expeditiously than any other estab- 
lishment on tbe Pacific Coast — using none but the best 
quality and brands of Boiler and Sheet Iron and Boiler 
Tubes. Those in want of anything iu the above line will 
do well to give us a call. Orders from the country will 
receive prompt attenlion. 

All work warraute l according to order. Particular 
attention paid to Repairing Steam Boilers. 

T. J. MOVNIHAN, } PrrtT ^ 0 „^ 
JAS. AITKEN. /Proprietors. 



N 



EPTUNE IRON WORKS. 



Corner Mission and Fremont streets, San Francisco. 
MARINE, LOCOMOTIVE AND ALL KINDS OF 

HIGH- PRESSURE STEAM BOILERS 

Manufactured. 

The proprietor imports bis own C. H. and B. Iron arrows 
the Isthmus, and Tubes of every size. Other parties can 
never blockaJe the market. He has made arrangements 
with the best houses in the East to furnish him with 
everything in the shape of Iron he wants. 

All Boilers guaranteed and tested by V. S. Boiler In- 
spector before they are sent out of tbe shop, at my ex- 
pense. tE^.All kinds of Sheet Iron and Water Pipe, Coal 
Oil Stills, Wrought lion Worms, etc., manufactured to 
order. OLD BOILERS REPAIRED. 

D. CAMERON. 



p 



IONEER IRON SHUTTER WORKS. 
Established 1849. 



John Upstone, 

MANUFACTURER OF FIRE-PROOF 

Doors and Shutters, 

Bank Vaults, Balconies, Gratings, Prison Cells, 
Awnings, Stairs, Iron Fence, etc., 

Corner of California and Drumm Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Constantly on hand a lavge assortment of second 
hand Fire Proof Doors and Siiutt^rs. 



I 



H. SMALL, 

I 

Machine Shop, 



BUILDER OF 
Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, 
Also, I H. Small's Patent Boot Screwing Machine. 
Gears of all kinds Cnt at Short Notice, 
And at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
Ropairingof all kinds done with Promptness and Dispatch. 

Corner of Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. O. IWNSOOM. 
U. S. SMITH. 



}HANSCOM & CO {™™ 

Etna Iron Works! 

S. E- corner Fremontaud Tehama Streets, San Francisco, 
Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QUARTZ MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, SAW- 
MILLS, FLOUR-MILLS, 
Dunbar's Improved Sell- Adjusting 
1' IS TON PACKING, 
Now so extensively used in the East and in this State. 
Requires no springs or screws ; is always steam-tight ; 
without excessive iriction, and never gets slack or leaky. 

HANSCOMS CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind now In use in this State or any where 
else. All kinds of GRINDERS and AMALGAMAT iRS 
made to order. Manufacturers ol the new Prospecting 
Quartz-Mills, consisting ol Boiler, Engine, 2-stanip Bat 
lery und Grinding and Amalgamating Pan, complete, for 
working l'n m one ton per day upwards. Drawings are 
furnished with each of these mills, so that any competent 
engineer can set it up Id running order in two days' time. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER-WHEEL, 
Giving greater power at lower cost than any wheel in use. 

Send for one of our circulars giving full tables. 

Ail Wheels warranted to give the Power aB set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

SOLE MAKERS FOR THIS COAST OF THE " PENDER 
GAST WHITE IRON STAMP SHOES AND DIES " 
None genuine unless obtained from ub. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 
at market prices. Particular attention given to drawings 
and specification? ol machinery, wiiich will he made to 
order. The patronage ol the public ii- respectfully solicited. 

«3,P.irtKUlar att'-ntiou paid to HOUSE WORK and 
ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS. 



r jnLIE CALIFORNIAN \S 
SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
J. D. Arthur & Co., coruer of California and Davis. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Townsend k Wyneken, 405 California. 

AUCTIONEERS. 
Cobb k Sinton, 407 Calitornia street. 

Bill, AND RACKET COURT. 
Thomas Kelly , 848 Howard street. 

BILLIARD SALOONS. 
A. B. Brown, 328 Montgomery street. 

BOWLING ALLEYS. 
Wholers & SteiI,Pine and Montgomery, (Russ House. 

BOOKS. 

E. F. Arnold, 538 Market street Dear Montgomery. 
A. Roman k Co., 417 and 419 Montgomery street. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 
Wcutworth , Hobart & Co. (wholesale manuf ac.) 210 Pine 

CARPETS. 

P. F. Loughran k Co. , 407 Sausome street. 

CLOTHING. 
H M. Lockwood & Co., 624 Clay street. 
J. R. Mead k Co., corner Montgomery and Bush streets 
William Shermau, 412 Sansome. corner Commercial. 
Quincy Hall, 545 , 547, and 549 Washington street. 

COAL OIL, LAMPS, ETC. 
Dell,Cranna& Co. (wholesale) 513 Front street. 
A. C. Dietz k Co., (wholesale,) 521 Front street. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Blake, removed to 645 Clay street- 
Dr. Win. B. McAllister, removed 18 Third street. 
N.T. Wbitcomb, 205 Thin', Dear Howard. 

DANCING ACADEMY. 
Coghill's, Congress Hall, Bush, above Montgomery. 
Fuller k McCarthy, 727 Market, near Third. 

DRY GOODS. 
Meagher, Taaffc & Co. . 9 Montgomery street. 
Mosgrovc k Blakely, 222 Third, near Howard. 
Buyer k Reich, S W corner Jackson and Stockton. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Waters & Dillon, (Billiard SalooD.) 314 Montgomery st 

G. G. Burnett, (Apothecary,) 330 Montgomery. 
Sliepardson A Gales, (successors to R. Hall & Co.,) cor- 
ner Sansome and Commercial. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 
Pacific Business College, 751 Market street, above Third. 
Prof. Williams' Commercial Academy, 869 Mission st. 

FURNITURE. 
Goodwin k Co. , 510 and 528 Wa.-hingtnn streets. 
N. P. Cole k Co. , 21 Sutler and 524 Market streets. 

GROCERS. 

Slosson & Ladd,southwe8i corner Folsom and First. 
Haskell & Co., Market and Sutlcrsls, below the Market 
W. M. Noble ,\ Co., cor Howard and Twelfth streets 

HATTER. 

Lamott (wholesale and retail) 227 Montgomery street 

HAY AND GRAIN. 
J. B. Holmes &Co., 110 Market street. 

HOTELS. 

Brooklyn, John Kelly, Jr. .Sansome, corner Pine. 
Chicago, E. W. Heimburg & Co. , 220 Pacific street. 
John Steiumann, 323 Pine. 

INSURANCE. 

Accidental and Casualty, R. L. k F. Ogdcn, Monlgom- 

ory street, corner California. 
Brooklyn Lire, S T King. Agent, S E cor Moctg'y k Pine 
Equilabl'e Life, R. L. k F. Ogdeo, Montgomery, corner 

California. 

Manhattan, p. B. Swain k Co. . Ag ts,206 Front, cor Cal 
Firemens Fund Ins. Co., S.E. cor. Montg'y and Pine 
Occidental Ins. Co. . S. W. cor. Hontgom'y and California 
Pacific Ins. Co. , 436 California street. 

LADIES' BIJOUTF.r.IE, CLOAKS, ETC. 
Rosenblatt's, 123 and 125 Montgomery street. 

LIVERY AND SALE STABLE. 

Philip Morshead, removed to Howard, near Fifth. 
White * Young, 211 Pine street. 

LUMBER. 

Armstrong, Sheldon k Co., corner Mission and Spear 

streets. 

MILITARY GOODS AND REGALIA. 

T. Rodgcrs Johnson, Odd Fellow's Hall, 325 Montg'ryst. 
NOTARY PUBLIC, 

H. S. Tibbey, 604, Montgomery street 

rnOTOGRAPHIC GALLERIES. 
New York. B. F. llowlaud proprietor, -.5 Third street, 
below Market. 

PIANOS, MUSIC, ETC. 
M. Gray, 613 Clay street. 

W. S. Pierce, i emoved fo 5?4 Market, opposite Second 
C. Weiderhold & Co , 685 Market near Third. 

PHOTOGRAPHS, CUTLERY, SPECTACLES, ETC. 
Lawrence k Houseworth, 317 and 319 Montgomery St. 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS. 
Daly k Hawkins, 220 Montgomery street. 
Dam & Sutherland, TOO Montgomery. 
Geo. W. Chapin,338 Montgomery. 
John Plorr, 328 Montgomery. 

SESTAURANT8. 
Bivalve, Noltlng k Sp-ecn. 640 Market, near Kearny. 
Ladies' Refreshment Saloon, Swain & Brown, 636 Market 
Magnolia, 143 Third street. 

Market, by Felix and Gustave Bessnn, 520 Merchant. 
Helvetia, Johnjury & Bros., 524 Merchant street. 
Sa* aun's, 506 Montgomery street. 

SALOONS. 

Russell k Holding's Exchange, 622 Market street. 
Charter Oak, Frank Kelly. N E cor Third and Howard* 
Razzelti & Co.'s. 527 Washington, above the Market. 
Jones' Sample Rooms, S.E. cor. Montgomery and Cal 
V. Squarza.44 LeidcsdorlTstreet. 
Coates & Henderson, 87 Sutter street. 

SCALES. 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson, Depot for Fairbanks' Scale! 

120 California street. 

SEWING MACHINES. 
Grover k Baker. R. G Brown, 116 Montgomery. 
The Florence, office 111 Montgomery street. 
Wheeler & Wilson, corner Montgomery and Sacramento. 

STOVES AND TIN WARE. 
A. Swigcrt, corner Fifth and Folsom. 

TOYS, ETC. 
Feldbuith ft Co., 207 Montgomery street 
A. Kohlcr, 620 Washington street. 

WATER-CURE INSTITUTE. 
Dr Bourne's Pioneer, 10 Post, near Montgomery 

WOOD AND COAL YARD. 
Flynn k O'Gra ly, 860 Howard street 



The CalitornianJ 



13 



BROADWAY. 

" ' The shadows lay alont,' Broadway, 

'Twas near the twilight tide, 
And slowly there, a lady fair, 

Was walking in her pride. 
Alone walk'd she, but viewlesBly 

Walk'd spirits by her side. 

" ' Peace charra'd the street beneath her feet, 

And honor charra'd the air, 
And all astir look'd kind on her, 

And call d her good as fair ; 
For all God ever gave to her 

She kept with chary care. 

" ' She kept with care her beauties rare, 

From lovers warm and true, 
For her heart was cold to all but gold, 

And the rich came not to woo ; 
But honored well are charms to sell, 

If priests the selling do. 
" ' Now walking there was one more fair, 

A slight girl, lily pale, 
And she had unseen company 

To make the spirit quail — 
'Twixt want and scorn she walked forlorn, 

And nothing could avail. 

" ' No mercy now can clear her brow, 
For this world's peace to pray ; 
For as love's wild prayer dissolved in air, 

Her woman's heart gave way : — 
But the sin, forgiven by Christ in heaven, 
By man is curst alway.' " 

— N. P. Willis. 

A correspondent in Skull Valley, Arizona 
mentions a scene that occurred in a village in 
Illinois, where dwells a magistrate named 
Helser. The minister of the village one day 
received a call from a soldier and a blushing 
maid, who wished to be married at once. On 
being asked for tne marriage license, the " boy 
in blue " declared lie had none, and, moreover, 
that he needed none, as he had known the girl 
tor four years and they liked each other, and 
didn't want license or permission from any one. 
The clergyman assured him that without a 
license he could not peiform the ceremony. 
The lover entreated, without avail, when the 
parson rather impatiently remarked: "You 
had belter take this girl and go to Ilelser." 

" Go to yourself, sir !" was the reply ; 

and the couple indignantly "evaded the prem- 
ises," with the conviction that profanity was 
not by an means confined to the army. 

Obituary Notice. — Dyed — in this village, 
on the 29th of March, the whiskers of "Jim 
Woodcock." They had long been an orna- 
ment in the circle in which they had moved ; 
but their roseate hue hath departed, and, in- 
stead, they present a hue of unearthly black- 
ness, which color is rapidly changing to a pur- 
ple, mingled with a lovely lilac. " Happy are 
those who dye young." 

Prefer solid sense to wit ; never study to 
be diverted without being useful ; let no jest 
intrude upon your good manners, nor say any- 
thing that may offend modesty or heedlessly 
hurt the feelings of another. When you have 
attained this height of philosophic virtue, you 
will be fit for Heaven — and the sooner you go 
there the better your associates will like it. 

The way to get a good wife — get a good 
girl and go to a parson. 



Tyler Brothers, 

^^^ ^^091 Market St., cor. Third, ^^^^ ^^^ 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
SCHOOL BOOKS, 

STATIONERY, 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, 

BLANK BOOKS, 
PORTFOLIOS, 

JUVENILE BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S PICTURE BOOKS, 

FANCY ARTICLES, Etc. 

ESPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

LADIES' STATIONERY, 

Which we Stamp with Initials 
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE. 

WEDDING A N D - VISITING CARDS 
Engraved, Written or Printed. 



DEXTER STABLES, 
Bush Street, between Occidental and 
Cosmopolitau Hotels, San Francisco. 

W. O. JONES, - PBonturroB 



WINE SALOON. 
Union Saloon.— C. H. Cordes is the proprietor of 
the Uuion Saloon, Market street, a few doors south 
of Fremont, where is to be found the choicest wines 
and liquors. Mr. Cordes prides himself on his Ken- 
tucky Whisky, which is very old and oily. The 
"Davis" brand whisky drinkers should by all means 
call and test this whisky. Hot lunch is set on the 
table from 10 till 2. 



California Wines. 

Vintage 1862. 

THE UNDERSIGNED OFFRS FOR SALE SOME 
very choice Wines, of the above namtd vintage. 
That connoisseurs, all interested in the development of 
toia magnificent resource of our Stale, and Ihe public 
generally, may be convinced that California is able to pro 
duce as good Wine (when properly treated and of suffi- 
cient age) a-i other parts of the Wine producing regions 
of the globe, attention is respectfully called to these 
Wines, by A. S. LOWNDES, Wine Merchant, 

311 Battery Street, S. F. 



u O UR 0PERA '' 

CAPT. JOHN H. MAY, 
615 WASHINGTON STREET, 615, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
Opposite Maguire's Opera House. 



JOHN TAYLOR, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 

NO. 16 THIRD STREET, 
Between Market and Stevenson Streets.. San Francisco. 



THE BEST FAMILY WINES 
I1V THE CITY 

— Arc to be found al — 

HOADLEY & CO.'S, 

533 Merchant street, under 
Pacific Fruit Market. 

SfS~ Call and try our Sonoma Champagne, Vega del Rio, 
Sonoma Port. Red and White Wines, Wine and Brandy 
Bitters, and all the varieties usually found iu a California 
Wine Cellar. 




DUNBAR'S EXCHANGE, 
No. 223 Bush Street, 
Bet. the Occidental and Cosmopolitan Hotels. 

US' HARRY RIKER would be pleased to seo his 
old friends at any huur of the day. 

Hot Lunch every day from 11 A. M. till 2 P. M. 

J. W. DUNBAR, Proprietor. 



FAUST CELLAR, 
Beer and Wine Saloon, 

Southeast corner of Clay and Montgomery streets, 

ban Francisco. 
A. L. THIELE, Proprietor 

ALWAYS ON HAND, Wholesale and Retail, West- 
phalia Hams, Russiau CAVIAR, Sardines. Aucho- 
vies, Swiss and Limburg Cheese, and other Etaropean 
Delicacies. JEJ- The finest brands of Liquors, Wines and 
Cigars ; Seltzer Water. 

FISHING AND HUNTING PARTIES fitted out at the 
shortest notice. 



MARTIN GROSTETTA, 

LATE OF VIRGINIA CITY, 

Would respectfully inform his friends and the public tha 
he has purchased the WELL-KNOWN SALOON previous- 
ly occupied by THOS. DOYLE, 535 SACRAMENTO ST., 
abovo the What Cheer House. The best kind of Wines, 
Liquors and Cigars always on hand. Passengers' Stores 
carefully put up to order. 



AYERS SARSJ1PJ1RILLA 



IS A CONCENTRATED EXTRACT OF THE CHOICE 
root,so combined with other substances of still greater 
alterative power as to aftord an effectual antidote lor dis- 
eases Sarpaparilla is reputed to cure. Such a remedy is 
surely wanted by those who suffer from strumous com- 
plaints, and that oue which will accomplish their cure 
must prove, as this has, of immense service to this large 
class of our afflicted fellow-citizens. How completely this 
compound will do it has been proven by experiment on 
many of the worst cases to be found in the following com- 
plaints : 

Scrofula, Scrofuloas Swellings and Sores, Skin Diseases. 
Pimples, Pustule-*, Blotches, Eruptions, St. Anthony's 
Fire, Rose or Erysipelas, Tetter or Salt Rheum, Ringworm, 
Scald Head, etc 

Syphilis or Venereal Disease is expelled from the sys- 
tem by the prolonged use of this Sabsafakilla, and the 
patient is left in comparative health. 

Female diseases are caused by Scrofula in the blood, 
and are often soon cured by this Extract of Sabsapa- 

RILLA. 

Do not discard this invaluable medicine, because you 
have been imposed upon by something pretendiug to be 
Par s;i pari la, while it was not. When you have used Ay- 
eb's — then, ami not till then, will you know the virtues of 
Sarsaparilla. For minute particulars of the diseases it 
cures, wo refer you to Ayer's American Almanac, which 
the agent below named will furnish gratis to all who call 
for it. 

Aznt'S Catoartic Pills, for the cure of Costivcness, 
Jaundice, Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Dysentery, Foul Stom- 
ach, Headache, Piles, Rheumatism, Heartburn arising from 
Disordered Stomach, Pain, or Morbid Inaction of the Bow 
els, Flatulency, Loss of Appetite Liver Complaint, Drop- 
sy, Worms, Gout, Neuralgia, and for a Dinner Pill. 

They are sugar coated, so that tho most sensitivo can 
take them pleasantly, and they are the best Aperient in 
the world for all tho purposes of a Family Physic. 

Prepared by J. C. AYER & CO., Lowell, Mass., and sold 

CRANE & BKIGHAM, San Francisco, 
and all Dealers 



ESTABLISHED IN 1851. 

Lawrence & House worth, 




317 AND 319 MONTGOMERY STREET, 



O 
P 
T 
I 

C 
I 

A 
N 
S 



THE LARGEST OPTICAL INSTRUMENT Es- 
tablishment on the Pacific Coast. Import all 
their own goods direct from European and Amer- 
ican manufacturers, and have a larger and more 
complete assortment than all other dealers com- 
bined. 

SPECTACLES and EYE-GLASSES warranted to 

suit the sight in every particular. 

Double sighted Spectacles, Tinted Spectacles 
and Biazilian Pebble Spectacles of the most ap- 
proved form. 

Those who have been disappoiuted at other es- 
tablishments will certainly be pleased with the 
Spectacles they purchase from us. 

N. B. — Inferior Glasses are not sold 
by us to the unwary for Brazilian 
Pebbles. 

LAWRENCE & HOUSEWCRTH, 
OPTICIANS, 
317 and 319 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Complete Catalogues of Optical Instruments furnished free. 



Beauty! 

Auburn, Golden, Flaxen and Silken Curls, 

PRODUCED BY THE USE OF PROF. DE BREUX 
FKISER LE CHEVEUX. 
One application warranted to curl the most straight 
and stubborn hair of either sex into wavy ringlets, or 
heavy massive curls. Has been used by the fashion- 
ables of Paris and London, with the most gratifying 
results. Does no injury to the hair. Price by mail, 
sealed and post paid, $1: Descriptive circulars mailed 
free. Address 

BERGER, SHUTTS & CO:, Chemists, 

No. 285 River street, Troy, N. Y. , 
Solo Agents lor the United States: 



Don't Read This! 



PORK TRIMMINGS § GIVEN AWAY. 

PRICES: 

Pigs' Heads 6 ccnte 

Pigs" Feet 7 cents 

Pics' Tongues 10 cents 

Tails '. 7 cents 

Spare Ribs 10 cents 

Sausage M< at 8 cents 

Pork Roast 10 cents 

Sugar Cured Hams 18 cents 

Breakfast Bacon 18 cents 

Leaf Lard 15 cnets 

The above are from grain-fed Hogs. 

No. 1 American Beef from 5 to 10 cc it- 

Sugar Cured Smoked Beef 12 1 2 ceut- 

Choi'-e Mutton 5 to 7 cuts 

FOR SALE— 1,000 South Down SHEEP. 

WILSON & STEVEN'S, 
508 Market street, 
9 8 liter stree' 



D. 



GHERARDELLIS & CO.'S 



Italian Manufactury, 

415 and 417 JACKSON ST. , SAN FRANCISCO, 
Manufacturers and Dealers in 

PLAIN, SWEET, CINNAMON AND 

VANILLA CHOCOLATES; 
PREPARED COCOA, COCOA PASTE, 

CRACKED COCOA, COCOA SHELLS, etc. , etc. 
PURE GROUND OLD JAVA COFFEE AND 

COSTA RICA COFFEE; 

CHARTRES AND RIO COFFEE; 

GREEN COFFEE OF EVERY QUALITY. 
CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS: 
N: B — Gherardebis" Choco'ate is manufactured by 
steam from Cocoa of the finest quality, imported direct. 
In excellence and delicacy of flavor, it is superior to any 
imported Chocolate: 



rp.HE SIGN OF THE BIG GLOVE. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 
25 Post street, between Montgomery and Kearny streets. 

J. F. SNOW, THE "GLOVE MAN." CLEANS 
f urs without removing the lining. All kinds of/ 
Dresses — including Stage and Party Dresses — [ 
WITHOUT RIPPING. Woolen Goods, Shawls, Buck 
aud Kid Gloves, Buck Undervests, Feathers, etc., etc. 
dyes Kid Gloves and Featbers. 

RING'S VEGETABLE AMBROSIA FOR THE HAIR FOR 
SALE. 



He 



Peet & Son, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS 
No. 315 BATTERY STREET, 
Nex Door to Commercial Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



NATURE UNVEILED, 
AT THE 

PACIFIC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY AND SCIENCE 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 
Between lifornia and Pine 




M ACCAR 0N1, YERMlCELLf, 

-« PASTE sT^RmA.*- 

706 SANS0ME r ST, 706?> 

S A Nw FRA NCIS CO 
— «N«a>c = 3ssS' 9 '-- 




J R. MEAD & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FINE C LO THING, 

.AND 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, 

TRUNKS, VALISES, CARPET BAGS, ETC., 
l200 & 202 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Corner of Bush, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Asphaltum Hoofing. 

PAVEMENTS, ROOFING, 
CELLAR FLOORS, WATER HOUSES, 

And all kinds of 

Asphaltum Work, 

Done at shortest notice, and at moderate prices, by 
M. BONNET, 
Office — Express Building (upstairs), 
N. E. cor. Montgomery and California sts., San Francisco 



AT THE REGULAR 




C. E. COLLINS & CO., 

G03 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
So*. 42 and 44 Nassau Street, 

NEW YORK. 
Dealers in* American, Swiss and English 
WATCHES, 
JEWELRY AND ATERIALS. 

— a 

4J-Wt have mnde arrangements to buy AMERI- 
CAN WATCHES in large quantities from the Fac- 
tory, and will receive a discount on the regulai 
Wholesale Prices. Wc will hereafter 

Retail the American Watches 

AT 

The Regular Wholesale Prices. 

Our only profit being the small 
per cent, allowed by buying in 
, arge quantities. 



££OWE - S NEW STYLE 

FAMILY SEWING MACHINES. 
GREAT IMPROVEMENT— JUST RECEIVED. 

ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR FINE WORK. Also, 
Braiding, Hemming, etc. The advantage these Machines 
halve is extreme simplicity, very strong and durable, not 
liable to get out of order — adapted equally well to all 
grides of work. The Howe should be examined by all 
contemplating purchasing. H. A. DEMING, 

137 Kearny street, S. W, cor. Sutter, San Francisco, Cal 



IF there is a Flor- 
ence Sewing Ma- 
chine within a 
thousand miles of 
San Francisco, that 
is not giving entire 
satisfaction, if I am 
informed of it, it will 
be attended to with- 
out express charge 
or expense of any 
kind to the owner. 
Samuel Hill, Agent, 
111 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 



The Californian 



LOVED TOO LATE. 

Far off in tbe dim and desolate Past— 

That shoreless and sorrowful sea 
Where wrecks are driven by the wave and blast, 
Shattered, snnken and lost at last, 

Lies the heart that was broken for me— 

Poor neart ! 
Long ago broken for me ! 
My loves were Glory and Pride and Art— 

Ab, dauueroas rivals three ! 
Sweet lips might quiver and warm tears start 
Should an artist pause for a woman's heart- 
Even that -which was broken for me ! 

Poor heart! 
Too rare to be broken for me ! 
Oh, she was more mild than the summer wind, 

More fair than the lillies be ! 
More true than the star with twilight twinned 
Was the spirit against whose love I sinned— 
- Th« heart that was broken for me— 
Poor heart ! 
Cruelly broken for me ! 
I told her an artist should wed his art— 

That only his tove should be ; 
No other should lure me from mine apart, 
I said ; and my cold words chilled ber heart, 
The heart that was broken for me— 

Poor heart ! 
Hopelessly broken for me I 
I spoke of the beautiful years to come, 

In the lands beyond the 6ea — 
Those years which must be so wearisome 
To her ; but patient lips were dumb ; 
In silence it broke for me ! 

Poor heart ! 
Broke, yet complained not, for me! 

1 pressed her hand, and rebuked ber tears 

Lightlessly and carelessly ; 
I said my triumphs should reach her ears, 
And left alone with dismal years 

And the heart that was breaking for me— 

Poor heart ! 
Silently breaking for me! 

My days were a dream of summer time 

My life waB a victory ; 
Fame wove bright garlands to crown my prime, 
And I half forgot in that radiant clime, 
The heart that was broken for me — 

Poor heart ! 
Patiently breaking for me ! 

But my whole life seemed, as the swift years rolled, 

More hollow aud vain to be; 
Fame's bosom at best is hard and cold — 
Oh, I would have given all praise and gold 
For the heart that was broken for me — 

Poor heart ! 
Thanklessly broken for me ! 

Sick with long, hope and dread 

I hurried across the sea ; 
She had wasted as though with grief, they said — 
Poor child, poor child!— and was long since dead ; 
Ah ! dead for the love of me — 

Poor heart ! 
Broken, and vainly, for me ! 

Weighed down by a load too heavy to hold, 

She died uuniurmuringly ; 
Aud I, remorseful and unconsoled, 
I dream of the wasted days of old, 

And of the heart that was broken for me — 

Poor heart ! 
Broken so vainly for me ! 

And my soul cried out in bitter pain 

For the bliss that cannot be — 
For the love that never can come again, 
For the sweet young life that was lived in vain, 
And the heart that was broken for me — 

Poor heart ! 
Broken and buried for me ! 



Tyler Brothers, 

^691 Market St., cor. Third, JBMfj t^. 
SAX FRANCISCO, ^gj. 3lJW 
Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
SCHOOL BOOKS, 

STATIONERY, 

PHOTOGRAPH AUSUMS, 

BLANK BOOKS, 
PORTFOLIOS, 

JUVENILE BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S PICTURE BOOKS, 

FANCY ARTICLES, Etc. 

ESPECIAL ATTENTION G1VEV TO 

LADIES' STATIONERY, 

Which we Stamp witlflnitials 
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE. 

WEDDING AND - VISITING CARDS 

Engraved, Written or Printed. 



DEXTER STABLES, 
Bush Street, between Occidental and 
Cosmopolitan Hotels, San Francisco. 
W. G. J0NE3, . - . Pbopbietob 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK BREWERY, 
Corner Powell and Francisco S'ls. 

Capital Stock $200,000, divided in Two Thousand 
Shares of $100 each. 

THEODORE MEETZ President 

WM. ERZGRABER Vice President 

J. G. WATERMANN Secretary 

TRUSTEES. 

FABIAN JOOST HENNING KOSTER, 

HERMANN WENDT, FREDERICK BRUNS, 

HERMANN SCHWARZE, PETER MEYER. 

The ubove Company intend to establish a reputation 
for making the best 

Ale, Porter, and Lager Beer 

In the country, and respectfully solicit the patronage of 
their friends and the public generally. 
All orders from the country promptly filled and 
delivered free of charge in the city. 



WILLIAM JAMES, I DAVID MEEKER, 7 „ — .„-|i_ 

Newark, N.J. | j. cobbledick, ' j San Francisco. 

jyjEEKER, JAMES & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Wagon & Carriage Materials, 

NOS. 12 AND 14 PINE STREET. 

The Latgest Establishment on the Pacific Coast for the 
supply of materials for 

|gg^ WAGONS, TRUCKS, 
CARTS, OMNIBUSSES, 
CARRIAGES, COACHES, 

EXPRESS WAGONS, 
BUGGIES, SULKIES, Etc. 
Also, Importers of 

GREGG'S TENONING MACHINES, 

Hub Boxing Machines, Thimble Skci?is for Wood 
Axles, Hub Bauds, Axle Clips. Shaft Shackles, 
Malleable Iron Castings, Concord Axles and 
Springs. 

as- Orders from the country solicited and promptly 
attended to. MEEKER, JAMES 4: Co. 




REMOVAL. REMOVAL. 

Larkins & Co., 




Mauufaclurers of every description of 

C A R R \_A G E S . 

CONCORD WAGONS, Ranch Wagons and Bupglee 
made to order. AH kinds of Jobbing and Carriage 

Painting done at the shortest notice. 
a^New Manufactory Nos. 631 and 633 Howard street, 
corner of Hubbard, between Second aud Third, 
San Francisco. 



A . FOLSOM, 




Carriage Manufacturer, 

No. 531 California street, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny streets, San Francisco. 

EVERY DESCRIPTION OF CARRIAGES, EXPRESS 
Wagons, Buggies, etc , made to order, of the best 
materials and workmanship. 

Repairing and General Blacksmithing done with prompt- 
ness, and at prices to suit the times. 



s 



AUL & McARRON, 



Manufacturers of 
STAGE AND THOROUGHBEACE WAGONS, 
NO. 679 and 581 MARKET STREET, 

Near Second Street, San Francisco. 

Makes to order all kinds of Carriage and Bngey Work, 
Express and Tborougutirace Wagons and Stage Work. 

A general assortment of new and second hand Wagons 
on haud. Jobbing done with neatness aud dispatch' 



Pollard & Carvill, 

Dealers in aud Manufacturers of 

LIGHT CARRIAGES 

AND BUGGIES 

37 and 39 Webb street. 
Between Sacramento and California. 

Also, Repairing, Blacksmithing. Painting and Trim 
miug done with neatness and dispatcn. 




c 



0 R N S ! 

DR. 



V. POPPER, 

Surgeon Ghiropedist 

No 20 Montgomery street, between Post and Sutter, 
San Francisco. Office hours from 9 a. m to 5 p.m. 

Offers his services to the public as an Operator on socli 
excrescences as hard and soft corns, enlarged joints, club 
nails, bunions, nails peuetrating the flesh, warts, etc. 



piRE AND MARINE INSURANCE. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY 
OP SAN FRANCISCO. 
Nos. 416 and 418 California Street. 

INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY. 

Cash Capital* .... §750,000 

The California Lloyds, 

HAVING CONSOLIDATED WITH THE UNION INSUR- 
ANCE COMPANY, JANUARY 1, 1868, THIS COMPANY 
ARE NOW PREPARED TO EFFECT MARINE AS WELL 
AS FIRE INSURANCE UPON THE MOST FAVORABLE 
TERMS. 

LOSSES PROMPTLY AND EQUITABLY ADJUSTED 
AND PAID IN GOLD COIN. 



Directors. 
J. Mora Moss, Benjamin Brewster, 

James Otis, Llovd Tevie, 

Win. E. Barron, Tho's. H. Selby, 

J. G. Kittle, Nicholas Lumng, 

Joseph A. Donohoe, John Parrott, 
M. J. O'Connor, J. Underbill, 

I. Friedlander, M. D. Sweeny, 

Moses Heller, C. N. Felton, 

Lafayette Maynard, James l'lielan, 
Charles L. Low, GusMve Touchard, 

Jacob Scbolle, Michael Castle, 

James Hows, Nicholas Larco, 

Joseph Seller, N. G. Kittle, 

L. H. Allen, Wm. C. Talbot, 

Win. Hooper, Patrick McAran, 

C. Temple Emmet, Geo. C. Johnson, 

Joseph Bramleustein, Caleb T. Fay, 

B. F. Hastings, Sacramento. 
L. Cunningham, William Smith, 

Marysville. 

CALEB T. FAY, President. 
CHARLES D. HAVEN, Secretary. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, Marine Director. 



QCCIDENTAL 

Insurance Company, 

Southwest corner Montgomery and California streets. 

INDIVID UAL~L1 ABILITY. 
Capital Stock, - - - §300,000 

LOSSES PAID IN UNITED STATES GOLD COIN. 

THIS COMPANY will insure against loss by Fire on any 
Dwelling House, Buildings, Mercbanise or other proper- 
ty, situated in the State of labfornia. The largest sum 
they will take on any one risk is thirty thousand dollars. 

C. CHRISTIANSEN, Pre'st. 
J. GREENEBAUM, Vice President 
B. Rothschild, Secretary. 



jyjANHATTAN INSURANCE CO. 
OF NEW YORK. 

INCORPORATED 1821 ; 

Cash Capital and Surplus 81,250,000 

Insurance effected against both 

Fire and Marine Risks, 

AT THE LOWEST RATES. 

Losses promptly adjusted, and paid in United 
States Gold Coin. 

E. B. SWAIN & CO., Agents, 
206 Front street, San Francisco. 



GREAT REDUCTION! 
FURNITURE 
At Less than Gold Cost, 

AT THE WAREROOMS OF 

J. PEIRCE & CO., 
Nos. 415, 417, 419 California street, 

SAN KRAJiCISCO. 

WE ARE NOW CLOS 
Ing out our last year's 
stock of FURNITURE- 
ctc, at UNPARALLEL- 
ED LOW RATES. 

It comprises the 
LARGEST AND FINEST 
assortment in tbe city — 
manufactured from the 
Latest Patterns, and in 
the most durable man- 
ner. 

Parties about to pur- 
chase aro invited to call 
and satisfy themselves of 
the correctness of these 
assertions prior to buy- 
ing elsewhere. 

J. PEIRCE & CO., 
415J417 and 419 California street 
BRANCH STORES— No. 715 Market street be- 
tween Third and Fourth: and Main street, Stockton. 




HEALY'S CURATIVE OIL, 

For the Extermination of Pain, is a Sovereign Remedy 
for Rheumatism, Headache, Tooihache, Sore Throat, 
Cramps in the Limbs, Diarrhoea, Sprains, Bruises, Bui us 
and Cuts, and for the Bites of Poisonous Insects, Frozen 
Feet, etc. , stands unrivalled. 

For Sale by all dealers in medicines. Price One Dollar 
per bottle. 



WINE SALOON. 
Union Saloon.— C. H. Cordes is the proprietor of 
the Union Saloon, Market street, a few doors south 
of Fremont, where is to be found the choicest wines 
and liquors. Mr. Cordes prides himself on his Ken- 
tucky Whisky, which is very old and oily. The 
"Davis" brand whisky drinkers should by all means 
call and test this whisky. Hot lunch is set on the 
table from 10 till 2. 



California Wines. 

Vintage 1862. 

THE UNDERSIGNED OFKRS FOR SALE SOME 
vory choice Wines, of the above named vintage. 
That counoisseurs, all iuterested in the development of 
this magnificent resource of our State, and the public 
generally, may be convinced that California is able to pro- 
duco as good Wine (when properly treated and of suffl- 
cient age) as other parts of the Wine producing regions 
of the globe, attention is respectfully called to these 
Wines, by A. S. LOWNDES, Wine Merchant, 

811 Battery Street, S. F. 



"QUR OPERA." 

CAPT. JOHN H. MAY, 
015 WASHINGTON STREET, CIS, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
Opposite Maguire's Opera House. 



JOHN TAYLOR, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 

NO. 16 THIRD STREET, 
Between Market and Stevenson Streets.. 3an Francisco. 



THE BEST FAMILY WINES 
IN THE CITY 

— Are to be found at — 

HOADLEY & CO.'S,} 

533 Merchant street, under 
Pacilic Fruit Market 

gg- Call and try our Sonoma Champagne, Vega del Rio, 
Sonoma Port. Red and White Wines, Wine and Brandy 
Bitters, and all the varieties usually round in a Calilorma 
Wine Cellar. 




DUNBAR'S EXCHANGE, 
No. 223 Bush Street, 
Bet. the Occidental and Cosmopolitan Hotels. 

Kij- HARRY RISER would be pleased to see bis 
old friends at any hour of tho day. 
Hot Lunch every day from 11 a. M. till 2 r. m. 

J. W. DUNBAR, Proprietor. 



FAUST CELLAR, 
Beer and Wine Saloon, 

Southeast comer of Clay aod Montgomery streets, 
ban Francisco. 



A. L. TH1EI.E, 



Proprietor 



ALWAYS ON HAND, Wholesale and Retail, West- 
phalia Hams, Russian CAVIAR, Sardine?, Ancho- 
vies, Swiss and Li m burg Cheese, and other European 
Delicacies, ajy- The finest brands of Liquors, Wines and 
Cigars ; Seltzer Water. 

FISHING AND HUNTING PARTIES fitted out at the 
shortest notice. 



J^jARTIN GROSTETTA, 

LATE OF VIRGINIA CITY, 

Would respectfully inform his friends and the public tba 

he has purchased the WELL KNOWN SALOON previous- 
ly occuplod by THOS. DOYLE, 535 SACRAMENTO ST., 
above the What Cheer House. The best kind of Wines, 
Liquors aud Cigars always on haud. Passengers' Stores 
carefully put up to order. 



AVER'S SJIRSJIPJIRILUI 



IS A CONCENTRATED EXTRACT OF THE CHOICE 
rool, so combined with other substances of still greater 
alterative power as to afford- an effectual antidote for dis- 
eases Sarsaparilla is reputed to cure. Such a remedy is 
surely wanted by those who suffer Irom strumous com- 
plaints, and that one which will accomplish their cure 
must prove, as this has, or immense service to this large 
class of our afflicted fellow-citizens. How completely this 
compound will do it has been proven by experiment on 
many of tbe worst cases to be found in the following com- 
plaints : 

Scrofula, Scrofulous Swellings aud Sores, Skin Diseases, 
Pimples, Pustule*, Blotches, Eruptions, St. Anthony's 
Fire, Rose or Erysipelas, Tetter or Salt Rheum, Ringworm, 
^cald Head, etc 

Syphilis or Venereal Disease is expelled from the sys- 
tem by the prolonged use of this Sarsa.'akilla, and the 
patient is left in comparative health. 

Female diseases are caused by Scrofula In tbe blood , 
and are often soou cured by this Extbact or Sabsapa- 
billa. 

Do not discard this invaluable medicine, because you 
have been imposed upon by Komethiug pretending to be 
Sarsapari la, while It was not. When you havo used Ar- 
m's — then, and not till then, will you kuow the virtues of 
Sarsuparilla. For minute particulars of the diseases It 
cures, we refer you to Aycr's American Almanac, which 
tbe ageut below named will furnish gratia to all who call 
for it. 

Ayeb's Cathabtic Pii.ls, for the cure of Costiveness. 
Jaundice, Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Dysentery, Foul Stom- 
ach, Headache, Piles, Rheumatism, Heartburn arising Trom 
Disordered Stomach, Pain, or Morbid Inaction of the Bow 
els, Flatulency, L iss of Appetite Liver Complaint, Drop- 
sy, Worms, Gout, Neuralgia, and for a Dinner Pill. 

They are sugar coated, so that the mot sensitive can 
take them pleasantly , and they are the best A|«'rii-ut in 
Iho world for all the purposes of a Family Physic 

Prepared by J. C. AYER & CO., I/>\\e!l, Mas«., aud sold 

by 

CRANE fit BKIGIIAM, San 1- 

and oil Dealers] 



The California!!. 



15 



T 



HE CELEBRATED PIANOS 




J. B. DUNHAM, F. C. LIGHTE & CO., 
AND ERNEST G ABLER, 

Are warranted for FIVE YEARS, and indorsed by the 
LEADING PIANISTS of AMERICA as SUPERIOR IN- 
STRUMENTS. 

Solk Agents — C WIEDERHOLD & CO , 

6S5 Market street, near Third. 



G 



REAT TRIUMPH ! 




STEINWAT <fc SONS 

Were awarded the FIRST PRIZE 
MEDAL at the lale great 
INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION AT LONDON, over the 
wo hundred and sixty-nine Pianos entered for competition 
from all parts of the world. 

The Special Correspondent of the New York Times says : 

11 Messrs. Stcinway & Sous' indorsement by the Jurors 
is emphatic, and stronger and more tothe point than that 
of auy European maker." 

A constant supply of the above superior instruments can 
be found at the Agent's, 

M. GRAY, 613 Clay street. 
PIANO TUNING done by a first-class "Workman, from 
Stcinway & Son's Factory, New York. 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

No. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

All kinds of Brass, 
Composition, Zinc, 
and Babbitt Meta 
Castings, f urnished 
at the shortest notice. 
Brass Ship-Work oj 
all kinds, Spikes, 

Sheathing Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, etc., constantly 
on hand and made to order. Also, manufacture Ship and 
Steamboat Bells and Gongs o f superior tone. 

All kinds of Steam, Liquor, Water, Oil, and Flange 
Cocks and Valves made and repaired. 

Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and 
Connections of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dis- 
patch. PRICES MODERATE. 

V. KINGWELL. JOS. H. WEED, SAM'L WHITE. 




SAN FRANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

Northeast corner Fremout and Mission streets, 
Manufacturers of 
MARINE AND STATIONARY ENGINES, 
Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Mining 
Pumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

ALSO, 

Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Presses of the latest 
Improved Patterns. 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand ; Quartz Mill .Shoes and 
Dies warranted to bo made of the best white iron. 
Dunbar's Improved SeM-Adju^ting Piston-Packing, re- 
quires no springs or screws; is always steam-tight; with 
out excessive friction, and never gets slack or Icakv. 

MACHINERY, OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, * 
Bought, sold, or exchanged. Bolt Cutting and Castings 
at the lowes tmarket rates. 

DEVOE, DINSMORE & CCf. 



P. COLE & CO., 

WHOLESALE 

Furniture Warehouse. 




So. 314: Fine street, San Francisco. 

LOWEST RATES AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK ON THE 
COAST. 

RETAIL STORE, 

Nos. 524 Market, und 21 Sutter streets — next door to 
the Metropolitan Market. 



TOHN HAGAN, 



Marble - Worker, 



MARKET ST , OPPOSITE LINCOLN SCHOOL 
HOUrE, between Fifth and Sixth. 

Marble MaLtels, Grates, Monuments, Head-«K^ 
stones, Cemetery Copings, and all kinds ol &j 
Marble Work executed ou most reasonable^ 
terms. Particular attention paid to the placingi^. 
or Tombstones at Lone Mountain or Calvary 9fa£Q^$* 
Cemetcrios. N. B. — Country orders promptly attended to. 



STOCKDaLE house, 
Corner Main and Oak streets, Pctaluma 

H. STOCKDALE Proprietor 



Powell Street 

WARM SWIMMING BATHS! 
N. E. Corner Powell aDtl Filbert Streets, 
OPPOSITE WASHINGTON SQUARE. 
J. M. NASH PROPRIETOR. 

WARM AND COLD BATHS from 6 A. m to 9 p. m. 
daily, with every appliance usually connected 
with a well-ordered Gymnasium for the development 
of Health and Muscle. 

Tlie only Complete Swimming Bath on 
tnis Coast. 

Another advantage connected with this establishment, 
not usually found in Swimming Baths, is, that the 
water is Continually Changing, Fresh Water running in 
and out Constantly. 

Single Baths, including Towels and Bathing Dress . 35 cts 
5 Bath Tickets, " " $1 

Call and Try Them. The Kearny Street and Mont- 
gomery Street Cars pass the door every Jim minutes. 

The Baths are reserved for Ladies every Tuesday, 
from 6 a. m. to 9 p. m. Ladies to supply their own 
Bathing Dresses. 

I will guarantee to impart a thorough practical knowl- 
edge of Swimming in one month'. Terms l or the Course, $10. 

J. M. NASH. 



JACOB SHEW, 

Pioneer Photographer 

613 CLAY STREET, 
North side, four doors above Montgomery. 
Takes all kinds of Photographs in the very best style 
of the Art. Would especially invite attention to the supe- 
riority ol the " Cabinet Photograph," or new size, taken 
at this establishment. 



pHOTOGRAPHT 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 
Executed in a Superior Style, at 

GEO. D . MORSE'S 

NEW AND ELEGANT ROOMS, 
No. 315 Montgomery Street, corner of Summer. 

Photographs retouched in India Ink or Water Colors, 
and copied from daguerreotypes or ambrotypes to any size. 
All work guaranteed and perfect satislaction giveu. Call 
and see specimens before going elsewhere. 



J C. E. KLEPZI G, 

MANUFACTURER 



— AND 

DEALER IN 




GUNS, PISTOLS,^ 
Sporting Apparatus, 



AMMUNITION 

AND GUN MATERIALS, 

No. 733 Washington Street, San Francisco. 
Gilding and Silver Plating of all Kinds of metals ; also, 
Silver or Plated Ware reburnlshed. 



JJOLBROOK, MERRILL & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

STOVES, TIN-PLATE, 

SHEET IRON, LEAD PIPE, PUMPS, ZINC, WIRE, AND 

HOUSE FURNISHING HARDWARE. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
TIN, SHEET-IRON AND COPPER WARE. 

Nos. 13 and 15 Front street San Francisco 

Nos. 176 and 178 J street Sacramento 

Main street Austin, Nevada 



A 



R R I Y A L 



— OF — 

MADAME LAURUSTINUS, 

The Great Prophetess and Doctress. 
The Madame has astonished thousands of her visitors in 
Europe, England and America, by revealing the Past, 
Present and Future Events of Lite, such as Law Suits, 
Travel by Sea or Land, Lost or Stolen Goods, Hidden Treas- 
ure, Absent Friends or Relatives, und all affairs of business 
in general. 

ijJS^Tne Madame has a select assortment of pure Roman 
Talismans, for Love, Good Luck, Success in Business, and 
guaranteed for Life. 

Office of MADAME LAURUSTINUS, No. 816 Montgomery 
street, between Jackson and Pacific. Office hours, from 8 
o'clock in themorning until 8 in the evening. 



D 



R. N. T. WHITCOMB, 



DENTIST, 
No. 205 Third Street, San Francisco. 



Teeth filled with fine gold, artificial bone and platina. 
All plate work made and repaired, of the best material, 
at the shortest notice and warranted. None cheaper or 
better on tho coast. Call and examine specimens. 

North Beach and South Park Cars pass the door. 

N. T. WHITCOMB. 



J^OCTOR DEMAREST'S 

Private Medical Office, 

617 KEARNY STREET, 

Near Commercial, San Francisco. 



Office Hoc as : From 9 a. m., till 4 p. M. 



CALIFORNIA 

Steam Navigation Company. 

STEAMER CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE. 

CHRYSOPOLIS. CAPT. A. FOSTER. 

" YOSEMITE 

" CORNELIA CAPT. W. BROMLEY. 

JULIA CAPT. E. CONCKLIN 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF, 
at 4 o'clock P. M., EVERT DAY, (Sundays excepted,) for 
Sacramento and oue for Stockton, ihe Sacramento steamer 
connecting with light-draft steamers for Marysville, Co- 
lusa, Chico and Red Bluff. 

Steamships PACIFIC, ORIZABA, CALIFORNIA, AC- 
TIVE, and SENA'IOR, leave as advertised, for Portland, 
Oregon, New Westminster, British Columbia, Victoria, 
(V. I.,) Santa Barbara, San Pedro, and San Diego. 

Office of the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

B M. HARTSHORNE, President. 



J^TRS. WINSHIP, 

Fashionable Milliner, 

NO. 23 POST STREET, 
Between Kearny and Montgomery, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



All kinds of Lace Work, Head Dresses, Breakfast Caps. 
&c, made to order. 

Particular attention paid to men.ting and dpiDg up 
Laces. 

Goods received by every steamer, from New York 
and Paris. 




• EMOVAL.— F IRST PREMIUM 

Billiard 
L E 




TAB 

MANUFACTORY. 



P. LISENFELD, 

Has removed from 612 Battery street to 537 Sacramento 
street, a few doors below Montgomery, 

Has constantly on hand a large assortment of the best 
BILLIARD TABLES, with all the modern improvements. 
Also BILLIARD TRIMMINGS or every description. 
All goods sold are warranted. 



AGENTS WANTED 
FOR 

JHeadley's Great Work ! 

The only book issued on our NAVY during the Rebellion. 
Agents Und no competition. 

FARRAGUT AND OUR NAVAL COMMANDERS, 

Comprising Popular Biographies of our Naval Hemes, 
by Hon. J. T. Headley, the distinguished Author and His- 
torian — complete in one large volume — handsomely illus- 
trated in steel. The best paying Agency of the day. 

In connection with this work our Agents can take ordcrp 
for five of Head ley's Standard Works, Call or send *1 
once for Circulars and Terms. 

E. E. SHEAR, General Agent, 
No. 8 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



McDOUUALL & MARQUIS, 

Architects, 

328 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

11. M*DOUGALL. J. MARQUIS. 



Refers to Messrs. Elam & Howes, Clay street, below 
Battery; Messrs. Hatch & Co., (R. W. Brangon & T. II. 
Hatch,) Washington street below Battery; A. J. Cogluli, 
Esq.. Front street, corner of Clay; Wm. J. Adams, Esq , 
(Adams, Blinn&Co.,) Piers 17 and 19, Stewart street; Jo- 
seph Rich, Esq., Bush street below Turuverein Hall; Hon. 
M. S. Latham, London and San Francisco Bank; Wm. B. 
Johnston, Esq., Insurance Building, 412and414MoDtgom- 
ery street; James Brooks, Esq. , Editor 41 Golden Era." 



LOTS FOR SALE ON BERNAL RANCHO. 

NOTICE IS GIVEN, THAT IN PURSUANCE OF AN 
Order of the Probate Court of the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California, the undersigned will 
sell at public auction, in two separate parcels, subject to 
confirmation by said Court, ou TUESDAY, the 4th day of 
June, 1867, at 12 o'clock noon, at the auction rooms of 
MAURICE DORE & CO., No. 327 Montgomery street, in 
said City and County, the real estate belonging tothe 
Estate of CORNELIUS" RICKTER, deceased, described as 
follows, to-wit: 

All tho^e certain pieces or parcels of land situated, 
lying and being on the Bernal Rancho, in the City and 
County of San Francisco, aforesaid anil known and desig- 
nated upon a certain map entitled, "Gift Map No. 3," as 
and by the numbers 269 and 271— being each 25 feet in 
width, in front and rear, and 70 feet deep. 

Terms of Sale— Cash, in United States Gold Coin. 
Deeds and Stamps at expense of purchaser. 

J. W. BRUMAGIM, 
Administrator of the Estate of Cornelius Rickter, deceased. 
Dated May 11th, 1867. myll-3w 



IN THE PROBATE COURT of the City and foun y of 
Sau Francisco, State of California. 
In the matter of the Estate of DANIEL B. BARNES, 
deceased. 

Order to show cause why order of distribution should 
not be made. 

On readiug and filing the petition of Stephen Smith, 
Administrator ot the Estate of Daniel B. Barnes, 
deceased, setting forth that he has filed his final account 
of his administration of the estate of said deceased, in 
this Court, and that the same has been duly settled and 
allowed ; that all the debts and expenses of administration 
have been duly paid; and that a portion of said estate 
remains to be divided among the heirs of said deceased, 
and praying among other things for an order of distri- 
bution ol tho residue of said estate among the entitled: 

It is Ordered, that all persons interested in tho estate 
of the said deceased, be and appear before the 
Probate Court of tho city and couuty of San Fran- 
cisco, at the Court Room of said Court, in tho City Hall in 
said city and county, on MONDAY, tho third day of 
June, A. D. 1867, at eleven o'clock, a, m., then and there 
to show causo why an order of distribution snould not bo 
made of tho residue of said estate among tho heirs of 
said deceased, according to law. 

It is further Ordered, that a copy of this order be pub- 
lished for four successive weeks, "before the said thicd 
day of June A D. 1867, in Thr Caufob-nia.v, a news 
paper printed and published in the said city and county. 

M. C. BLAKE, Probate Judge. 

Dated May 3d, A. D. 1867 my4-5tl3 



IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE Fif- 
teenth Judicial District Of the State ot California, in 
and for the City and Couuty of San Francisco. 

EDWARD J. QUIRK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES P. HOR- 
BACH, et als., Defendants 

Actiou brought in the District Court of the Fifteenth 
Judicial Distnct of the Stato of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, and the complaint filed 
in the said city and county of San Francisco, in the office 
of the Clerk of said District Court. 

The Peopled the State of California send greeting to 
JAMES P. HOKUACH. HENRY DELVENDAHL, HENRY 
BREM MERMAN ERNfcT JAN^SEN and GUSTAV HELM- 
KE, Defendants: 

You are hereby required to appear in an action brought 
against you by the above uamed Plaintitf, in the District 
Court ot the Fifteenth Judicial District of the State of 
California, iu and for the city and county of San Fran- 
cisco, and to answer vhe complaint tiled therein, within 
ten days (exclusive of the day of service) after the serv- 
ice on you of this Summons— if served within this coun- 
ty ; or, if served out of this county, but in this 
District, within twenty days ; otherwise, within forty 
days — or judgment by default will be taken against you, 
according to the prayer of said Comulamt. 

The said action is brought to require you, the said de- 
fendants, to set forth the nature of your respective claims 
to that certain lot or parcel of laud situate in &aid city aud 
couuty of Sau Francisco, as particularly described iu tho 
complaint herein, being subdivision No. 5 of the 100 vara 
lot known on the map of tho city of San Francisco as No. 
276, as designated on a plat of the original subdivision 
thereof, recorded in the office of the County Recorder of 
said city and County, in Liber 1 of Certified Grants, at page 
156, that all adverse claims of said defendants and each of 
them maybe determined by a decree of this Court; that by 
said decree it be declared and adjudged that the said de- 
fendants, each and all of them, have no estate or interest 
whatever in or to said parcel of land, and that the title of 
plaintiff thereto is good and valid ; that said defendants, 
and each of them, be forever debarred from asserting any 
claim whatever in and to said laud adverse to plaintilt , and 
for such other and further relief as to this Hon. Court shall 
seem meet and agreeable to equity, with costs of suit 
against such of the defendantsas shall defend this action. 

And you arc hereby notified that if you fail to appear 
and answer the said complaint, as above required, 
the said plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief 
demanded in said complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the District Court 
of the Fiiteenth Judicial District of the Slate of Califor- 
nia, in and for the city and county of San Francisco, this 
25tn day of February, in the year of our Lord one thous- 
and eight hundred and sixty-seven. 

WM LOEWY, Clerk, 
[seal.1 By OcTAvrcs Bell, Deputy Clerk. 

Int. Rev. Stamp, canceled. 60 cts. 
Tnos. B. Bishop, Plaintilf's Attorney. mh30-13w 



IN THE DISTRICT COURT of the FOURTH 
Judicial District of the State of California, in and for 
the City and County of San Francisco. 

SIEGMUND T. MEYER and ASHERT. MEYER, Plain- 
tiffs, vs. LINA A. SON, Defendant. 

Actiou brought in the District Couit of the Fourth 
Judicial District of the State of California, in and for the 
City and Couuty of San Francisco, and the complaint tiled 
in the said City and County ot Sau Francisco, in tho oliice 
of the Clerk of said District Court, 

The People of the State of California send greeting to 
LINA A. SON, Defendunt : You are hereby required 
lo appear iu an action brought against you by the above 
named Plaintilf, iu the District Court of the Fourth Ju- 
dicial District of the State of California, in and lor the 
City aud County of Sim Francisco, and to answer the 
complaint tiled therein, (a copy of which accompanies this 
summous) within ten diys (exclusive of the day of ser- 
vice) after the service on you of this summons — if served 
within this county ; or, if served out of this county, but 
iu this district, within twenty days; otherwise, within 
forty days — or judgment by default will be taken against 
you, according to the prayer of said complaint. 

1 be said action is brought to recover the sum of two 
thousand nine hundred and ninety-one and 85-100 dollars, 
alleged to be due from you lo the plaintiffs on a judgment 
recovered by said plaintills against you, and mor« particu- 
:a ■ ly described in the coinplaiut herein, together with 
costs ot suit. 

Ami yoo are hereby notified, that if you fail to app ar 
and answer the said complaint, as above required, the 
said Plaint ills will take judgment against you for said sum 
and costs of suit. 

Giveu uiuicr my l and and the seal of the District Court of 
the Fourth Judicial District of the State of California, 
m uiM lor the City and County of Sau Francisco, this 
nineteenth day of February, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven 

WM. LOEWY, Clerk. 
By Jas. E. AsnrjoM, Deputy Clerk. 

[SEAL, AND INTERNAL REVENUE STAMP CANCELED .J nih2-3m 

IN THE PROBATE COURT of the City and County of 
Sau Francisco, State of California, 
in the matter of the Estate of ELLEN JENNER, de- 
ceased, 

Order to show cause why order of distribution should 
not be made. 

On read h?g and filing the petition of William A. Jeuner, 
the Executor of the last will and testament of Ellen Jenner, 
deceased, setting forth that he has hied his final account 
of his admiuistraiion of the estate of said deceased, in this 
Couit, and that the same has been duly settled and 
allowed; that all the debts and expenses of adminiBtra- 
lion have been duly paid; and that a portion of taid 
estate remains to be distributed to the heirs and devisees 
of said deceased, aud praying among other things for an 
order of distribution of the residue of said estate among 
the persons entitled : 

It is ordered, That all persons interested in the Estate 
ol the said Ellen Jenner .deceased, be and appear before the 
Probate Court of tun City and County of San Francisco, 
at the court-room of said court, in the City Hall in said 
city and county, on MONDAY, the 3d day of June, A. D. 
1867, at 11 o'clock, a, a*., then and there to show cause 
why an order of distribution should not be made of the 
residue of said Estate among the heirs and devisees of 
the said Ellen Jenner, deceased, according to Jaw. 

It is further ordered that a copy of this order be pub- 
lished for four successive weeks before tho said third 
day of June, A. D. 1867, iu The Californian, a news- 
paper printed aud published in the said city and county. 

M. C. BLAKE, Probate Judge. 

Dated April 23d, A. D. 1867. 

Tuos. B. Bishop, Att*y lor Executor. ap27-4t 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. — Estate of CLAUDE JAC- 
QUIN, deceased: 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, William 
Rowan, Administrator of the estate ot >aid deceased, to 
the creditors of, and all persons having claims against 
the said deceased, to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers, within ten months after the first publication 
of this not.ee, to the sail William Rowan, at No 532 
Merchant street, Room No. 3, in the City and County 
of San Francisco. 

WM. ROWAN. 

Administrator of the estate of Claude Jaequin, deceased; 
Dated at San Francisco, April 20th, 1867. my4-6w 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. — ESTATE OF HENRY 
SEAMAN, deceased. .Notice- is hereby given by the 
undersigned, Administratrix of the above named estate, 
to tho creditors of, and n'\ persons having claims 
against the said deceased, to exhibit the sumo with 
the necessary vouchers, witi-in ten months ■sifter the first 
publication of this notice, to t o uudereignfld, at the 
office of D. P. Barstow, E*q., No. 6 Montgomery Block, 
in the city and countv Bftttu Frnnei-co. 

JANE SEAMAN, 
Administratrix of the Estate uf Henry Seaman, deceased. 
May 10th , 1867. niyll 6w 



The Californian. 



16 



jyjAGUIRE'S OPERA HOUSE. 

Thomas Magotbe, Sole Proprietor 

Cahs. Tibbeits Business Manager 

C. L. Gbaves Stage Manager 

Wm- Stevenson Treasurer 

The Beautiful and Fascinating 

HELEN WESTERN, 

Supported by THE GRAND COMBINATION COMPANY, 
This Afternoon May 35th, 

CAPTAIN KYD. 

THIS EVENING, 

Captain Kyd, and Toodles. 

In Rehearsal— The Helen Western Speciality : 

HOME AND ABROAD! 

In which she will enact Ten Characters, and introduce the 
celebrated FEMALE MINSTRELS. 

PBICES OF ADMISSION: 

Dress Circle $1 00 1 Orchestra II 00 

ParqueUe 50 | Upper Circle 26 

.jS-No Extra Charge fot Reserved Seats. 

jy/[AGUIRE'S ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

Thomas Maoctbk ........ .Proprietor 

ChaMaEs Tibbetts Business Manager 

ITALIAN OPERA. 

SATURDAY EVENING MAY 25th, 

Will be presented the Grand Opera of 

LA FAYORITA! 

Leonora di Guzman Madame Stella Bonheur. 

Ferdinaud «S nor % Limberti. 

Alphooso XI ^ignor G Mancusi. 

Balthazar *»S*?' « Jf** 

Don Gaspar Mens. Charles. 

Inez Mme - Ha,L 

MONDAY EVENING I MARTIRI. 

Conductor ~ ..MR. GEO. T. EVANS. 

03" The Regular Subscription Nights will be Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday. On Saturday evening an extra 
night will be given. 

METROPOLITAN THEATRE. 

MONDAY EVENING MAY 27th, 

Engagement of the Distinguished ETHEOPIAN 
COMEDIANS, . 

MESSRS. LESLIE AND RAYNOR, 

Late Members of the World-Renowned 

" Christy's Minstrels," 

From St. James' HaU and Her Majesty's Concert 
Room, London, and who performed in all the Principal 
Cities in Enalanl and Australia. 

At the request of many influential citizens, the Man- 
agement have succeeded in eil'ecting an engagement 
with the ahuve named 

CELEBRATED ARTISTES, 

Who will be assisted by a distinguished array of 
MINSTREL TALENT, and will give a short series of 
Retlued Entertainments in 

American Minstrelsy and Burlesque Opera. 

For Particulars, see future announcement. Box 
Sheet now opjn— where Seats cau bo secured four 
diys in advance, without extra charge. 



HAYES' PARK, 

ANOTHER CHAMPION PERFORMANCE 

....FOR.... 

SUNDAY MAY 26th, 1867. 



JO- Cheapest and Best Place of Amusement on the 
Pacific Coast. 



MISS ELLA LA RUE 

WILL MAKE AN 

ASCENSION ON A TIGHT ROPE. 



Thomas Rosa 

In his Great DISLOCATION, OR INDIA RUBBER 
ACT, in conjunction with 

Eugene Lee, 

IN HIS GREAT SOMERSAULT ACT. 



GRAND DOUBLE ACTS! 
BY MESSRS. ROSA AND LEE. 

At the close of the Performance, 

A GRAND BALL! 

With Alper's Metropolitan Brass and String Band. 



Erin Go Bragh. 




H 1 B E R K I A 
Smoking Tobacco, 

UNEQUALLED BY ANY IN THE MARKET. 

B. C. HORN & CO., 

FRONT STREET, CORNER OF CLAY, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Admission 35 Cents. 

O" Ladles Free. 
|*3_The new Four-horse Cars run direct to the 
Park. 



w 



ONDERS OF WONDERS ! 

TO BE SEEN OXLY AT THE 

^acific Museum of Anatomy and Science, 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 

between CaUTnia and Pine. 



5,0 0 0,0 0 0 CIGARS 
At $5 per Thousand, 

FOR SALE BY 

B. C. HORN & CO., 

FRONT STREET, CORNER OF CLAY, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



O 0 

TRY IT! 

STANDARD SOAP CO. "S • 

WASHING POWDER. : 

It saves one-half the lime and ; 
labor of ordinary Snaps. Does : 
not injure the Clothing. Get a : 
package and give it a triaL So.d : 
by all Grocers. ; 



•O 



J CUTBERLET,. 

CUSTOM l?- 
BOOT AND SHOE STORE, 

— ALSO — 

FRENCH SCREWED BOOTS AND SHOES, 
No. 5445 Washington Street, near Montgomery Street. 



The Finest quality of CUSTOM WORK neatly executed. 
Always on hand other fine work rea'ly made. 




Adams, Dentist, 423 M ™tgomerj 



Newly Opened. 



McKee's 

NEW GROCERY 

AND 

FAMILY FURNISHING 

Store, 

No. 31 KEARNY STREET, 
Third Door South of Post Street, 

NOW RECEIVING ORDERS FOR GROCERIES, PRO- 
visions. Table Luxuries, and all Housekeeping 
articles of the best quality at low prices. 

Ay er's Sarsaparilla 

TO 

Purify the Blood. 

NOT A FEW OF THE WORST DISORDERS THAT 
afflict mankind arise from the corruption that accu- 
mulates in the blood. Of all the discoveries that have 
been m id e to purge it out, Done have been louud which 
could, equal in effect Ayeb's Compoumd Extract of 
Sarsaparilla. It cleanses and renovates the blood, in- 
stills the vigor of health into the system and purges out 
the humors which make disease. It stimulates the 
healthy functions of the body, aDd expels the disorders 
that grow and rankle in the blood. Its extraordinary 
virtues are not yet widely known, but, when they are, it 
will no longer be a question what remedy to employ in 
the great variety of afflictin? diseases that require an 
alterative remedy. Such a remedy, that could be relied 
on, has long been sought for, and now, for the lirst time, 
the public have one on which they can depend. Our 
space here does not admit Certificates to show its effects 
But the trial of a single bottle will show to the sick that 
it has virtues surpassing anything they have ever taken. 
Sufferers from Scrofula, Scrofulous Swellings and Sores, 
try it and see the rapidity with which it cares. Skin 
Diseases, Pimples, Pustules, Blotches, Eruptions, etc. , are 
soon cleaned out of the system. 

St. Anthony's Fire, Rose or Erysipelas, Tetter or Salt 
Rheum, Scald Haad, Ringworm, etc.. should not be borne 
while they can be so speedily cured by Aykb's Sabsapa- 
billj. 

Syphilis or Venereal Disease \b expelled from the sys- 
tem by the prolonged use of this Sarsapabjixa, and the 
patient is left as healthy as if he never had the dissase. 

Female Diseases are caused by Scrofula in the blood, 
and are generally ^oou cured by this Extract of Sarsa- 
parilla. Price $1 per bottle, or 6 bottles lor $5. 

For all the purposes of a family physic, take Ayer's 
Cathartic Pills, which are everywhere known to be the 
best purgative that is offered to the American People. 

Prepand by Dr. J. C. Aver & Co., Lowll, Ma»s., and 
cold by all Drogglsts and dealers in medicine everywhere. 

CRANE k BKIGHAM, Sm Francisco, 
Wholesale Agents. 



Black Silks. 

200 PIECES. 

VERY SUPERIOR BLACK SILKS. 

Suitable for 

DRESSES, 

CLOAKS AND 

MANTILLAS, 
AT A REDUCTION OF 25 PER CENT. 

From Cost of Importation. 

MEAGEER, TAAFFE & CO., 

9 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

LICK HOUSE. 

WHOLESALE HOUSE, 
No. 107 BATTERY STREET, BETWEEN CAL- 
IFORNIA AND PINE. 



Cloths, Cloths. 

500 PIECES. 

FRENCH, SCOTCH AND ENGLISH CLOTHS 

Suitable for 
CLOAKS, AND MEN AND BOYS' WEAR, 
Just received, and will be offered on 
MONDAY, 13tli inst., 
AT A REDUCTION OF 50 PER CENT. 
From Cost of Importation. 

MEAGHER, TAAFFE & CO., 

9 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

LICK HOUSE. 

WHOLESALE HOUSE, 
No. 107 BATTERY STREET, NEAR PINE. 



Family Dry Goods 

AT 

REDUCED PRICES! 

Cotton Sheetings and Shirtings ; 
Linen Sheetings and Shirtings ; 
Towels and Towelings ; 

Barncsly, Scotch and French Table Damask and Table 
Cloths ; 

Flannels, Blankets, Quilts, Etc. 

—ALSO— 

A large line of French Cambrics, Nainsooks, Mull 
Mull, Jaconets and Organdies, suitable for Ladies' 
and Chill rens' Dresses. 

MEAGHER, TAAFFE & CO., 

9 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

LICK HOUSE. 

WHOLESALE HOUSE, 
No. 107 BATTERY STREET. NEAR PINE. 



PRO BONO PUBLICO. 

LACOUR'S 

SARSA PA RIP HERE 

BITTERS 

POSSESS INVALUABLE PROPERTIES. 
Tbey give Health to the Sick, 

Strength to the Weak, 

Joy to the Afflicted. 
UNSOLD EVERY WHERE. -©fl 



THE CENTRAL PARK OF THE PACIFIC. 
^r° 0DWARD ' s GARDENS, 

Art Gallery, 





Museum, Gymnasium 



.AND. 



ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. 

THESE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS ARE VISITED DAILY 
by hundreds of the pleasure seeking public, and 
all agree in pronouncing them the best and only first 
class suburban resort on the Pacific coast. 

The extensive grounds are covered with the rarest 
trees and shrubbery, making it a most desirable spot 
for small parties wishing to enjoy a Pic-Nio. 
New attractions are being constantly added. 
These Gardens are accessible by the Howard, Market 
and Folsom street cars Entrances on Mission and 
Valencia streets, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth. 
OPEN EVERY DAY. 

Admission 25 cents. Children under 12 years, half 
price. 

MERICAN HOTEL, 

Main street. . - - Pctaluma. 

EMERSON & LAMBERTON, Proprietors. 



pACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.'S 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 
NEW YORK, JAPAN AND CHINA, 

WILL BE DISPATCHED AS FOLLOWS : 

Leave Folsomstreet Wharf at 11 o'clock a. m. or the 
following dates, for PANAMA, connecting via Panama 
Railroad, with one of the Company's splendid steamers 
from ASPINWALL for NEW YORK. 

On I'm i , 18th , and 30th of each ninnt a that has 80 days. 

On 10th, 19th, and 301b of each month that has 31 days. 

When the 10th, 19th and 30th fall on Sunday they will 
leave on Saturday preceding ; when the 18lh falls on Sun- 
day, tbey will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th touches at 
Mauzanillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departure of 19th connects with French Transatlantic 
rompany's steamer for St. Nazaire, and English steamer 
for South America. 

Departure of 10th connects with English steamers for 
Southampton and South America, and P. R. R. Co.'s 
steamer for Central America. 

STEAMERS FOR MAY. 
May 30th— SACRAMENTO, Capt. J. M. Cavarly, connect- 
ing with OCEAN QUEEN, Capt Maury. 

Passengers will be berthed through. Baggage checked 
through— 100 pounds allowed each adult. 

Surgeon on board. Medicine and attendance free. 

These steamers will-positively leave at 11 o'clock. Pas- 
sengers are requested to have their baggage on board be- 
fore 10 o'clock. 

Through tickets to Liverpool by the "Cunard," '• In- 
man" and '-National" Steamship Lines can be obtained at 
P. M. S. S. Co.'s office in San Francisco. 

For Merchandise Freight apply to Wells, Fargo ft Co. 

The splendid steamship COLORADO will be dispatched 
on July 3d, lor Hongkong via Kanagawa, carrying pas- 
sengers, mails and freight. 

F"r Passage and all other information, apply at Pacific 
Mail Steamship company's ofhec, corner of Sacramento and 
Leidesdorlf streets. 

OLIVER ELDRIDGE, Aftent. 



Great Reduction in Hates. 

QPPOSITION TO NEW YORK 
EVERY TWENTY DAYS I 

Carrying the United States Mail via Nicaragua ! 
THE OPPOSITION STEAMER 

AMERICA, 

2500 Tons EDGAR WAKEMAN. Commander. 

Will sail lor SAN JUAN DEL SUR, Nicaragua, from 
MISSION STREET WHARF, at 11 o'c.uck, a. a , on 

WEDNESDAY, - - JUNE hlh, 1867, 

Connecting at Grevtown with the magnificent Steamship 
SANTIAGO, 2,500 tons, for NEW YORK. 

^.Tbe MoSES TAYLOR will sail June 25th. 

For further information, apply to 

I.W. RAYMOND, Agent, 

Northwest corner Battery and Pine streets, up stairs. 



There comcth glad tidings of joy to all, 

To young and old, to great and to small ; 

The beauty which was once so precious and rare. 

Is free tor all, and all may be fair. 

By the use of 

CH ASTELLAR'S 
WHITE LIQUID ENAMEL, 

OR IMPROVING AND BEAUTIFYING THE COM- 

plexion. 

The most valuable and perfect preparation In use, for 
giviDK the skin a beautiful pearl-like tint, that is only 
found in youth. It quickly removes Tan, Freckles, 
Pimples, Blotches, Moth Patches, Sallowness, Eruptions, 
and all imparities of the skin, kindly healing the same, 
leaving th£ skin white and clear as alaba-ter. Its use 
cannot be detected by the closest crutiny, and beinif a 
vegetable preparation is perfectly harmless. It is tbe 
only article ot the kind used by the French, and is con- 
sidered by the Parisian as indispensable to a perfect 
toilet Upwards of 30,000 bottle* were sold during the 
past year, a sutllc ent guarantee of its efficacy. Price 
only 75 cents. Sent by mail, post-paid, on receipt of 
order, by 

BERGER, SHUTTS ft CO , Chemists, 

285 River street, Troy, N. Y: 



Excelsior ! Excelsior ! ! 

Cn ASTELLAR'S 

HAIR EXERMINATOR, FOR REMOVING 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR. 

TO THE LADIES ESPECLAIJjY, THIS INVALUABLE 
depiliatory recommends itself as being an almost 
indispensable article to female beauty, is easily applied, 
does not burn or injure the skin, but acts directly on 
the roots. It' is warranted to remove superfluous hair 
from low foreheads, or from any part of the body, 
completely, totally and radically extirpating the same, 
leaving the skin soft smooth and natural This is the 
only article used by the French, and is the only real 
ctlectual depilatory in existence. Price 75 cents per 
package, sent post paid, to any address, on receipt of 
an order by 

BERGER, SHUTTS ft CO., Chemists, 

285 River street, Troy, N. Y. 



Whiskers and Mustaches ! 



FORCED TO GROW UPON THE SMOOTHEST FACE 
lace in from three to live weeks by using Dr. 
SEVIGNE'S RESTAURATEUR CAPILLAIRE, the most 
wonderful discovery in mod rn science, upon the Beard 
and Hair in an almost miraculous manner. It has been 
used by the elite of Paris and London with most Hat- 
tiring success. Names of all purchasers will be regis 
tered, and if entire satisfaction is not given in ev«ry 
instance, the money will be cheerfully refunded. Price 
by mail, scaled and post paid, $1. Descriptive circulars 
and testimonials mailed Ire-. Address 

BERGER, SHUTTS ft CO., Chemists, 

No. 285 River street, Troy, N. Y., 
Sole Agents lor the United States. 



JAKES C. PARUNSO* JOHK J. MAflONlT. 

pARKINSON & MAHONEV, 

GILDERS AND MANUFACTURERS 

— of — 

LOOKING-GLASS AND PICTURE FRAMES, 
No. 333 Kearny street, between Pine and Bush, San 
Francisco. All kinds of Oval Frames. Lithographs and 
Engravings kept constantly on hand. Futures clcanad 
and varnished. Old Framas regilt 



VOLUME VII., No. 2. 
Office, No. '532 Merchant street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JUNE 1, 1867. 



TifTfMii 5 A Year, by Mail, in Advancb 
xi^Kiua, ^ 5Q Cekts a M o NT h, by Carrie k 



CONTENTS: 

Original : Dignity, No. Two, by Prentice ; A Roman Catholic 
Theory of Toleration ; A Poetical Puzzle; A Military Police— State 
Interference in Municipal Affairs : Literary Gleanings : Swinburne's 
New Poem ; Dr. Thrall's Essay on the Episcopate, as The Missionary 
Order of the Church ;" Mark Twain's " Book. " Lion's Mouth :" 
The Bulletin's " Lady " Correspcndena in Paris; Reform; Preven- 
tion of Cruelty to auimals. Dramatic Affairs ; The Opera, etc. 
Selected : The Plaintiff Nonsuited, a Lawyer's story ; How the 
Lion Stocks his Larder, etc. etc. 



THE LION'S MOUTH. 

11 Tub gravest beast is au ass , the gravest bird is an owl, the gravest fisn 
is an oyster, aud the gravesi man is a fool." Sydney Smith. 

" I will roar, that I will do any man's heart good to hear me." 

A Midscmjiee Night's Dream. 

" I will aggravate my voice so, that I will roar you as gently as any suck- 
ing dove ; I will roar you an 't were any nightingale. " Imo. 
u Nil falsi audeat, nil veri non audeat dicere*" Cictno. 



The ' Bulletin's " "Lady" Correspondent in Paris. 

The last letter from the woman whom the Bulletin has engaged to 
write an account of the Paris Exposition is not worthy of admission 
inlo the columns of so respectable a paper. She complains of the un- 
finished condition of the building on April 11th, and hopes that the fin- 
ishing touch will soon be given to it. She then says : 

" Mi traps embrasse mnl e'trtnte is an old saw the Commissioners, 
in their ambition to give the stamp of universality to their undei taking, 
have done well to bear in mind.'' 

It is hard to say which is the most incomprehensible in the above 
paragraph, the French (?) or the English. Then this correspondent, 
referring to the English Exhibition, says: 

" I so well remember how Queen Victoria, leaning on Prince Al- 
bert's arm, and holding by the hand a little boy dressed in Highland 
costume, (who has since developed into a graceless man,) was able 
without running the risk of a sore throat, to expose her royal neck and 
shoulders to the eyes of the enkhusiastic multitude. No blinding col- 
umn of dust forced her to Bhut her honest blue eyes," etc. 

As the Prince of Wales is at the present, time engaged in filling the 
duties which properly belong to the lady with the honest blue eyes, and 
ha9 done nothing as yet to make the people of England consider him 
" graceless," the statement of the. female correspondent of the Bulletin 
must be taken cum prano salts. Near the end of her letter the cor 
respondent rather backs down on the ladv with the blue eyes, saying 
with reference to a model of the mausoleum erected to the Prince Con- 
sort . 

" When I saw this monument of her grief, I doubted of the troth of 
the historv of her adventures with John Brown, the faithful Gillie to 
to whom it is said she is about to be privately married." 

This is the true old gossip's style: " I don't believe Mrs. Smith did 
bo and so ; she is really such a good woman I almost doubt it j but yet 
whokuows?" This lady correspondent picked up a " sea captain " 
at the Exposition, and struck him for a breakfast. She says : 

"A Russian peasant, speaking French with a Parisian accent, gave 
me a plate caviar for 40 cents. It was very palatable but not nice to 
look at." 

It is really kind of this person to inform the public of Sau Francisco 
that caviar is " very palatable, but not uice to look at," and that the 
poor sea captain had to pay 40 cents for her plate. In the criticism 
on the paintings, we are told that the " pro-Raphaelites ' pretentious 
eccentricities are extraordinary." We must say that the pretentious 
eccentricities of this female correspondent of the Bulletin — if it is a 
female— are very extraordinary. She is constrained by no laws of 
deceDcy, grammar, or the courtesy due to foreign languages. 

Edwin James on Bankruptcy. 

Edwin James has written a book entitled : 

" The Bankrupt Law of the United States, 1867. With Notes, and 
a Collection of American and English Decisions upou the Principles 
and Practice of the Law of Bankruptcy." 

Mr. James says in his preface i 

" Some experience as a legislator upon this subject, and many years 
practice in the English courts of bankruptcy, have induced the author 
to undertake the work."' 

This distinguished English lawyer might have entitled his work 
"The Bankrupt Law, by a Bankrupt." Mr. James wotild have to 
legislate considerably before he could get the privilege of passing 
through " the English courts of bankruptcy." He would probably 
have the pleasure of spending the lemainder of his life in a debtor's 
prison if he returned to England, where his liabilities amount to some- 
where about a hundred thousand dollars. 

Comfort for the Hungry. 

The Dayton Empire says that Mr. Brown has lived fifty-fonr days 
without food. Read this ye complaining ones who strive to borrow 
four bits on the grounds that ye have not had a square meal for two 
days ! If Mr. Brown of Dayton can live fifty four days without food, 
why cannot ye do likewise 7 Oh, ye of little faith ! Ye have never 
tried. Only try the experiment instead of filling out your poor per- 
ishable bodies directly they become a little shrivelled. Think of Mr. 
Brown 1 What man has done, man may do again. 



Prevention of Cruelty to Animals— Difficulty of Organiza- 
tion. 

There was a talk the other day among the animals at the North 
Beach Menagerie relative to this matter. From the City Pound 
there had come a delegation consisting of two escaped curs to confer 
with the North Beach people. Some organization was said to be nec- 
essary for protection against man. There being a dearth of spec 
tators, the meeting was called to order. It was proposed to appoint a 
President. 

" I ought to be President," said the ring-tailed monkey, swinging 
himself to and fro. Many monkeys have been Presidents of different 
organizations and societies. I need the office. It will keep me out of 
mischief. If I am not President I shall make trouble. 

" Yon, a President," growled the grizzly. Dignity 16 needed for 
that office. I need not say where that is to be found. 

The parrot also put forth some claims on the ground of possessing 
superior oratorical powers. 

The coon who had been uneasily walking backward and forward, 
saw his opportunity, and objected to feathered bipeds having any 
voice in the meeting. "They were not animals,'' said he. "This 
proposed organization was for the benefit of animals. Birds were not 
animals." 

Then there arose a great hubbub of dispute and contradiction. The 
monkey and the fox rejoiced and sided with the parrot. They wanted 
the feathered vote. The fox had his eyes on the Vice Presidency. 

The discussion occupied two days. It was finally decided against 
the birds, on the ground of their being bipeds. There was a prejudice 
against bipeds, man, their great enemy, being a biped. So it was de- 
cided that none were entitled to the benefits of the proposed organi- 
zation, but those who went on all-fours. The monkey after this took 
good care to walk on four feet, and even the grizzly stood not erect as 
formerly. How grovelling is selfish ambition. Yet the chances of 
both were lessened for the Residency. It was a master strike of 
policy on the part of the coon to lessen the bear's and monkey's politi- 
cal prospects. He did not see, however, that liis own were not a bit 
improved. Organization was more difficult than ever. 

During a'l this time the escaped curs had nearly starved to death 
while patiently waiting for the appointment of a committee to whom 
they might present their credentials and be received as members of the 
convention. Tired of the necessary delay, they started back to the 
pound. On their way thither they were again captured by the muni- 
cipal dogerrillas, and arrived at their old quarters just iu time to be 
drowned with twenty-five other unfortunates. 

Reform. 

Thousands of onr citizens, influential and otherwise, patiently suffer- 
ing the unfortunate organ-grinder, who leaves no portion of this city 
unmolested, whose terrible and increasing repetition of " Dixie " and 
other airs doomed by him or his instrument to an eternal torture, is wear- 
ing many weak and sensitive organizations iuto their graves, Thou- 
sands of our citizens, we say, would eagerly join in a benevolent en- 
terprise having for its object either the retirement of this peripatetic 
but mechanical votary of Apollo from public life, or the purchase of 
a new organ. It is no wonder with this terrible instrument in our 
midst that the public are- so fickle iu their encouragement of 
Italian Opera, or that the discovery of deceased infants under sidewalks 
aud woodpiles is a matter of such common occurrence. 

Another desideratum is the procuring of a clean if not new suit ol 
clothes for the one-legged Italian beggar, whose wonderful patience 
in maintaining his position at that corner, strikes the reflective and 
observing beholder with admiration. Don't you know the man 1 
He of the bald head, two crutches, one leg, benevolent countenance 
of beseeching air, observing you as you pass with an expression 
which, as you approach him, seems to say, " This man is charitable. 
He will give." Aud theu, when you go on, his leathery facial mus- 
cles exclaim, turning to the next passer-by " No. He is like the reBt 
of the cold, cold world." We pity our Italian brother's indigence, but 
his double-distilled untidiness is distressing. 

The man who bawls euloguims on four dollar boots, cheap shirts, 
socks, etc., near the corner of Clay and Montgomery, should either 
be entirely abolished, or turned into a revival preacher, or political 
stump orator. We mean the man whose voice is characterized by a 
deep and hollow baseness, suggestive to people of a consumptive 
habit of body and strong imagination of expectoration of blood, con- 
sequent upon such a tremenduous wear of lungs. It shameful that so 
bass a voice should be wasted on such base wares. 

How Kind. 

Last Monday's Times frankly and stupidly made the acknowledg- 
ment that that journal " had not in all respects refleoled the views of 
its proprietors." This admission does not certainly reflect much credit 
on the management of a "First Class Daily." And the Bulletin, 
while patronizingly extending the hand of welcome to the Times, of 
course repeats the dying confession of that paper just to keep the pub- 
lic reminded of the inefficiency and inability characterizing its course 
So does Mrs. Grundy sometimes damn her victims with a sort of sym" 
pathetic censure, saying, " Mrs. Jones acknowledged to me her folly, 
poor woman. She says herself, she is a dolt and a stupid, but you 
know that ia no new thing to lb. 



A Common-Sense Boston Legislator. 

On April 27th a debate occurred in the House of the State of Mas- 
sachusetts on the resolution granting $10,000 to Professor Agassiz's 
Museum. Mr. Branning, of Lee, strenuously opposed the passing of 
the resolution. He didn't believe in the museum. It was of no prac- 
tical use to the common people ; no students were educated there, and 
nobody went there but the Legislature ouce a year. It was a place 
for the storage of pickled snakes, periwinkles, dead fish, and such 
trash. He believed that the old fossils who were interested iu this 
museum were better able to pay its bills, than was the State. Mr. 
Mason, who replied to Mr. Branning. said, shaking his finger at him, 
that he should, at least, be thankful that this great man had demon- 
strated to bis friend that he (Mr. Branning) and those who came before 
him did not come from the gorilla. Was Mr. Branning, the common- 
sense man who did not believe in storing up pickled snakes, peri- 
wiuKles, dead fish, and such trash to be put down this? No! He 
replied that " he did not require this ; his Maker had given him com- 
mon sense enough to tell him that he was the creation of his band!" 
All honor to Mr. Branning, who possessed such very common sense ! He 
didn't care for the other member's sense which had been cultivated, he 
liked the good common article. He is the sort, of man who would pre- 
fer pork and beans to truffled turkey, and would consider that what 
was g«od enough for him was good' enough for any other man in the 
world. That's the right sort of talk. Bring these fellows .who have 
better sense than their neighbors down to common-sense. Alas ! 
The resolution granting $10,000 to Professor Agassiz to defray the ex- 
pense of pickling snakes and other trash, was passed by a vote of 
106 to 6. There is much tt«common sense in the Boston Legislature. 

Persecution of the Jews. 

Iii New York a Jew butcher has been arrested and bound ove 
under $500 bail for cruelty to animals, by cutting the throat of a bul 
lock instead of first knocking him on the head. The rites of the Jews 
forbid them to kill animals in any other way, and they will strenu- 
ously oppose this new order of things, which they claim is an infringe- 
ment upon them in a religious point. 

It may be justifiable, although all religionists are supposed to have 
equal lights in the United Staters to compell everyone to observe Sun- 
day in the maimer prescribed by the Scotch and English Churches. 
When, however, the Jews are debarred from making money on Sun- 
day, as well as on the Sabbath, and have to spend two days of the 
week in grief and lamentation, we think it is a little too rongh on 
them to prevent them from killing their bullocks as they please. If a 
little more than-necessary suffering on the part of one thousand bul- 
locks aids in saving one Jewish soul from hell, have the Society for 
the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals any right to interfere '! We 
trow not. The rites of the Jews forbid them to kill bullocks in any 
other manner than by cutting their throats, and are they to be forced 
to risk their souls because New Yorkers do not understand their relig- 
ion'! There has been too much persecution of the Jews. It is time 
that it should be put a stop to. They should be protected from the per- 
secution of the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals aud the New York Insurance Companies. Is it possible that 
New York wishes to drive them to California ? 

An Observation. 

In the physical world there is but little territory left to discover, but 
there are vast multitudes who have yet to find that they won their 
own souls. 

Auger in many instances arises from a cowardly fear of seeing or 
being told our own faults. When apparently enraged at others we 
are really enraged with ourselves for being enraged at all. For fur- 
ther confirmation consult your own soul after a fit of passion. 

Unceasing regrets for past transgressions are as useless as the con- 
duct of one who, having passed over a weary desert, insists on turn- 
ing back and again needlessly traversing the same route. 

The last two inferences are the result of one hour of meditation after 
an accusation of theft of newspapers ; said accus.itiou being partly 
true, 

A "Plash" Religion. 

The Dramatic Chronicle remarks : 

" T'-e Sunday papers continue their intelligent supervision of the 
metropolitan pulpit. Can't they furnish us with the programme of a 
new and " flash" Btyle of religion Buited to the taste and capacity of 

their readers 1" 

Perhaps Bro. Todd, the apostle of "Our beautiful and philosopio 
Faith," might render assistance in getting up the new style of relig 
ion needed. 

The Flag. * 

Since its resuscitation the Flap evinces ne\v vigor. It is a double 
turreted monitor among the old bulks. Something must be done to 
save the sinking fleet, against which its shots are directed with sue 
terrible effect. McDouald 8 foot is once more npon his native heath. 
He wields a keen blade, iuflicting thrust upon thrust on hie s»ow and 
nompous adversaries, overbnriheneu hv the cumbersome iumoi o. 
bogus dignity aud worn out conventionality. 

More Jugglers. 

Another compaav of Japanese jugglers have wived, T,bere Beem 
to be a fearful demand for Japanese jugglers. The legitimate dram 
is buried fathoms deep under this spreading taste for barbaric contor- 
lions of bodv and sleight of band. Aspirants for theatrical fame ar 
advised to quit Sliakespearo and devote tueir tune and energy in be- 
coming eluatic aud contortic. 



2 



The Californian. 



HOW THE LION STOCKS HIS LARDER WHEN 
HE IS A PATERFAMILIAS. 

WE often read and hear of the wonderful strength of the 
"King of Beasts," and how it i.' displayed in carry- 
ing on large animals which he has slain, very long distances, 
to feast at his leisure. My own experience leads me to infer 
that those who tell such tales are misled by natives, who, as a 
rule, believe anything that they fancy about the powers of the 
lion, without taking the trouble to investigate facts ; atfd trav- 
elers who have little time, and possibly less inclination to 
search for themselves, adopt the tales they hear — not willingly 
deceiving others, but being misled themselves. There is a 
large class who would, in such cases, prefer the common mode 
of arguing, i. e. " it is easier to believe than to go and see." 
I once labored under misconception that the lion had such 
vast strength that he could convey a cow or a bull, as the case 
might be, but I was cured of my credulity iu the following 
manner. 

Seated at our round-table of African teak, merry as crickets 
round a hearth, we smoked our cigars in peace ana with gusto, 
for they were a recent present from the ladies of Cape Town, 
and therefore the sweeter. As we sat piff-puffing, our well- 
beloved General dropped in, and took a cup of coffee. At the 
close of one of his charming pictures of home life in England, 
the General made some observations upon the intelligence of 
the " colley," or the shepherd's dog, and gave some instances, 
which exhibited great sagacity on the part of a dog that be- 
longed to a farmer, over whose grouDd be had shot during one 

f those too brief intervals in which his military life had per- 
mitted him to enjoy the domeatic life he so well loved. While 

11 admitted the cleverness of the dog referred to, Glenlyon, 
whose Highland birth and early boyhood had furnished him 
with many indubitable proofs of the sagacity of these useful 
animals — shepherd's dogs — was appealed to by the General to 

ay whether he had ever known or heard in his native moun- 
tains the equal to the one he had spoken of. The Highlander 
replied he thought he kuew instances in which the instinct of 

he dogs had been as fully developed as in that particular one ; 
" but," said he, " for clear judgment in selecting the most de- 

irable animal from a herd of cattle, and for skill in driving 
him a long distance after he has been picked out from a herd, 
and separated from it, I consider a lion or a tiger infinitely 
superior to any dog that I have ever seen, read or ieard of 
and some of the tales told in the Highlands and on the Bor- 
ders are wonderfully stiff ones, I can assure you. Every shep- 
herd's dog, like every man's horse, is ' the best in the world :' 
that they will maintain ; and in order to do so they give some 
extraordinary instances of superior intelligence. If some of 
them had heard you say the dog you spoke of went after the 
beast nineteen miles, found him,,brought him back, they would 
have said they knew a dog that would do all that, and would 
have sat down and written a letter to his master to say he was 
coming, in order to relieve the master's mind of his anxiety 
about the lost beastieas soon as be had found it." 

After a laugh, in which the General cordially joined, the 
latter said, for in all matters of hunting, etc., Glenlyon was an 
authority : 

" Is it a fact, Glenlyon, that lions and tigers do actually se- 
lect beasts from large herds, and drive them to their own re- 
treats ?" 

" It is, I assure you ; and I really believe a middle-aged 
lion, one who is a father of a family, is the best drover in the 
whole world, quadruped or biped. I have seen many men 
who were accounted to be skillful drovers, and men of vast 
experience, who never could have done, and never would 
have attempted, what I have seen a lion and a tiger do with 
a refactory beast, which he had selected from a herd a hun- 
dred times greater in number than any herd we can have in 
our country — besides their greater wildness — and yet he has 
taken him off, over the roughest country imaginable, and 
safely conducted him to his lady-love, who, with her tender 
babes, was waiting for her supper." 

" It seems almost incredible ! One can scarcely imagine 
such capabilities, and yet there must be something of the kind 
one, now and then ; for I remember several cases where cat- 
tle have been lost without a trace of blood, or of any struggle 
whatever having taken place anywhere within a wide radius." 

" No doubt," observed Glenlyon, " many a beast has gone 
down to the account of the Kaffirs which some canine lion 
has driven off at the end of his nose ; but if we were to tell 
these stupid Dutch boers bow they went, they would swear we 
were descendants of Munchausen or Ferdinand Mendez 
Pinto." 

" And you have seen lions do this 1" said the General. 

" Repeatedly. I have also seen tigers in India do it, but 
not so often. As to lions, I will undertake to show instances 
of their capabilities to any one who will accompany me some 
night, within a week." 

When the General was gone, and we were all seated behind 
well-lit cigars, 1 ventured to ask my friend if he would allow 
me to accompany him on one of bis nocturnal expeditions in 
quest of lions, so that I might have ocular demonstration of 
the carious fact he had related, a fact so new to me that I re- 



ceived it with surprise. I did not doubt for one moment bis 
accuracy, for I knew bim to be exceedingly cool and obser- 
vant in any position of danger, and eminently truthful in all 
the relations with which he favored us of his experiences. 

'• With much pleasure, my dear Snooks. Provide yourself 
with a good night-glass, so that you may closely watch all his 
manoeuvres, and I have no doubt you will be highly amused. 
If the beast he selects should chance to be a young bull, you 
may see some fun ; and the lion will require all his sagacity 
and agility to make him go the desired road, more especially 
if there be any trees on the way, or water. The beast will 
plunge into any stream or lake in the hope to get away from 
his pursuer ; but lions will face water in such a case like a 
Newfoundland dog, and head him like the best ' colley ' that 
ever put teeth in wool : but if the night be gloomy you will 
need a good glass to see all the details minutely, as I should 
wish you to see them." 

The next day Glenlyon sent for the Kaffirs, and inquired 
whether they knew of any lions being within easy distance, es- 
pecially any lionesses which had had any addition to their 
family circles lately. Two of them— not the lions, but the 
Kaffirs— belonging to the last batch of prisoners we had re- 
ceived, grinned, and said in a sort of mysterious whisper, they 
knew of one— each! oh, such a big one! They were in the 
large caves beyond the marshes hi the devil's cave. Therei 
upon the third night after the discussion at the round-table, 
we bent our steps, accordingly. 

We marched on till Glenlyon thought we were near enough 
to the cave9 to see any creature leaving them or going in. Of 
the latter there was not much chance, if it were true that the 
monarch of beast had taken up his abode therein. While 
daylight lasted, there was no chance of the royal beast going 
out— he would be, as Glenlyon said, " about enjoying his last 
nap prior to getting up and going to business," so there would 
be plenty of time for us to take some coffee before dusk, after 
which all signs of fire must be removed. 

I lay myself down upon the gorgeous flowers which decked 
our resting-place. A thicket, an arm of a mighty forest, 
stretched itself out toward the vast rocks in which " The 
Caves " were hidden. Every tree was a Titan, and we seemed 
to be but pigmies creeping through them, and as we did not 
advance far in, we had all the enjoyment which the brightest 
foliage and the richest flowers could afford. Pushing some of 
the lofty parasitical plants on one side with each of his hands, 
our guide, who was a very useful fellow, by the way, at once 
made a most luxurious bower for us. It was getting gloomy. 

" Keep your eye upon that arched opening in the huge rock. 
If the lion be there he will come out over those boulders, and 
his anxious lady will perhaps come out first, to look at the 
weather ; she will be sare to accompany him to the edge of 
the boulders nearest to us, to see that he goes off to do his 
night's work." 

•' Ilitchj, where do you think the old fellow will find beef to- 
night ?" (This to our guide.) 
" Daoun ze rippa," (river). 

" That's a good ten miles' journey for us, perhaps more, ten 
as the eagle flies. Picket the cob safely, Ilitchj, cover him up 
well, get all ready, we may have to start in five minutes." 

" I thinK 1 see a lion's head." I observed. 

" Do you ? where ? Oh, I see—ah, that is the lady— she is 
taking a sight of the sky ; the screams of the eagles have 
aroused her, and she is afraid there will be no beef to night- 
She is right, too, I will take care of that. Keeg your eye upon 
her till the old gentleman comes. She will fetch him out, if 
he do uot come soon." 

I did as requested. I carefully watched the lioness. After 
looking skyward and downward, and all about her in front of 
the stronghold in which she dwelt, the lady of the castle sud- 
denly came forward, trotted quickly down between the bould- 
ers, and then halted just in front of them, it might be to get a 
more correct notion of the weather, or to see if any cause of 
alarm was nigh to account for the row made by the eagles, or 
both of these purposes. Having apparently satisfied herself, 
one way or the other, she reascended the path she had gone 
down with that loose, shambling gait peculiar to the larger 
beasts of prey, and soon disappeared round the angle of the 
arched way which led to her den, and where I first caught 
sight of her head. Iu a moment she returned, just protruding 
her head as she had at first. If the lady were not cross, she 
ought to have been, for she looked so ; but I fancy no hungry 
lioness can look good-tempered, especially if she have some 
craving youngsters to think about, and a sleepy husband. 

I told Glenlyon all this as he was eyeing his double roer to 
see it was ready for action when required, and he said : 

" Ah, the guidwife is gone to rouse the sluggard, she will 
not be long turning him out. All females have a strange 
malicious pleasure in rousing a male creature out of his last 
comfortable nap, whether wife, sister, or a maiden aunt ; even 
a chambermaid at an inn raps twice as hard as the ' Boots ' at 
your door, but any other female iu any other office is the same, 
down to a lioness. Now if that royal sluggard do not tumble 
out in two minutes or " a brace of shakes,' as sailors say, 
there will be a row— he will get a ' Caudle lecture ' on the 



duties of husbands and fathers in providing for their families. 
Tell me when he comes out, he is sure to be the first under 
the gateway ; you will see him yawning till his head is more 
than half off, and then stretching himself till his legs seem to 
be parting from his body, blowing up his wife at intervals for 
disturbing his natural rest." 

It was singular how well my companion knew the habits of 
the creatures of which he spoke. It did not seem more than 
a miuute ere the very image he had described appeared before 
my telescope. The head of the lion peered round the angle 
of the rock, with the huge jaws widely disteoded, and the cav- 
ernous mouth seemed as if it would never close again, so pro- 
longed was the gaping. But it did close, and the bead shot 
suddenly forward, as if somebody pushed him out. Then there 
was another yawn, and next came a stretch of the fore legs , 
the body being drawn backward till the legs seemed of an un- 
usual length ; next the body was drawn forward, and I could 
see the wild, shaggy, but not ungraceful mane, and the massive 
shoulders, while 1 could well fancy the hind legs were under- 
going the elongating process. Then there seemed to be an- 
other impulse from behind, and the whole body of the lion was 
quickly propelled into view, just as he was about to indulge 
iu another yawn, the rude interruption ot which seemed to 
provoke his majesty ; for he suddenly sprang round, and his 
jaws snapped violently at something, which seemed to be too 
quick for him to catch hold. 

" Ilitchj, get on after that reluctant hunter — he moves off 
but slowly — you will easily keep him in sight. \ou Kaffirs 
all know how to follow on the trail of beasts, so I need not 
tell you to keep on his lee side, as sailors say, but you know I 
mean that the wind shall blow from him to you." 

Ilitchj showed all his teeth and nodded, not a la Burleigh, 
but with the rapid and forcible motion of a hammer. Glen- 
lyon went on : 

" The nignt is dark. Our signal must be the cry of the 
young alligator, or, as you call them, ' Goorghj.' Can you 
make the sound ?" 

Ilitchj sent forth a shrill plaintive wail, like that of an in- 
fant, quite exhausted, but in acute pain ; so natural was it 
that it was startlingly suggestive of dying babies. 

" That will do," said Glenlyon, approvingly. " I see you 
are a practiced hunter. That signal will keep us together, 
however dark it may be." 

Allowing some minutes to elapse after Ilitchj's departure | 
we went out of our fairy arbor, and marched on in silence. 
After turning the angle of the rocks we went on for ten min- 
utes, when Glenlyon sent forth the signal for the whereabouts 
of our Kaffir guide. It was quite a surprise to me. I had 
forgotton all about signals, and my thoughts were far away 
with one very dear to me, ond for the life of me I could not 
help fancying some poor chilil was in agony. Glenlyon 
laughed, but he quickly suppressed his mirth, and said, " Lis- 
ten." 

In a moment after the word was uttered, another wail was 
heard, so full of mortal anguish that I felt as if a cold stream 
were trickling down my spine. 

" We are on the right track," said my companion ; " but 
we must keep more to the right. The lion is leading Ilitchj 
in that direction, and both be and we must follow our leader 
for some time to come." 

Ever and anon sounded the signal which kept us and our 
guide well up with each other. Intervals of ten minutes only 
were allowed to elapse between them ; thus we were secure 
that we were on the right track. 

Presently the single cry of the young alligator was heard in 
a faint tone, but seemingly close to us, and I conld but feel 
how admirably the signals were arranged. Such a cry could 
awake no suspicion in the animal we pursued, and it also ap- 
peared, even to my unpractised ear, as one just suited to the 
locality : for away t» the right, from whence the wind blew, 
there seemed to come an odor of malaria, indicating marshy 
ground, where alligators might be found. I made no remark 
then, because Glenlyon was exchanging signals with Kaffir to 
guide him up to us, and in a moment he was before us. 

" Do you think we are far from the beef now ?" said Glen- 
lyon. 

" Close to. Zee tree, two zide ? go troo dem" 

" Then, in that case, we will all go together. Keep Indian 
file. I will lead. Snooks, see to your barrels !" 

" Send down the ramrod. Ilitchj, do the same. That will 
do. See to your caps. Never throw a chance away. Out 
with your night-glass. We will ascend the bank there on the 
right, where the tallest of the trees are ; follow me as stealthily 
as cats. If there are any monkeys in the trees they will be 
at use if wo make a noise ; Ilitchj knows that." 

" Ilitchj knows too moosch dat." 

" I thought so. Tell this gentleman how to follow me with- 
out making any row. On the bank we can sit, if there are 
no snakes, aud watch our friend in his manoeuvres to get one 
out of the herd, and drive him through the gap between the 

two banks." 

We may sit down and rest for an hour ; it will take him all 
that to get the beast he fauciet out of the herd and through 
the gap. Come on." 



The California!!. 



We followed our leader, whose steps was the lightest I have j 
ever yet seen taken by man, and he was six feet high and over 
thirteen stone in weight. We soon gained the bank, which 
was composed of a loose soil, which gave as we placed our 
feet upon it ; and we fuund the branches and the trunks of 
the white, or more properly, as I think, the grey, ash very use- 
ful iu helping us to ascend. At the top. we knelt and looked 
cautiously over the wide savannah beyond, which was then, 
the scene of much commotion. The herd had winded the lion. 
More probably the sentinel on duty, as there always is round 
herds of wild cattle when feeding and resting, at various 
points, had seen their dreaded enemy when he stealthily passed 
through, or before he approached the gap, and if so had given 
a danger-signal, as usual in such cases. 

The lion was going round the herd, which was running 
wildly and full of consternation, and gradually getting them 
into a smaller circle. He did his work silently, because the 
terrors of the poor creatures were sufficient to make them do 
all he required, which was simply to get them together in as 
small a compass as possible, knowing that the bulls would all 
be on the outside of the solid mass, in order to give the 
females all the protection in their power. This proceeding, 
as the herd was a vast one, occupied some time, during which 
he was walking or rather going round them at a sort of sham- 
bling pace, neither a walk nor a trot, but something of both ; 
his face upturned to, and his eyes seeming fixed upon those of 
the animals which faced outwards ; but many of them, indeed 
all the younger bulls, turned their backs upon the enemy, 
while their heads were anxiously turned back over their 
shoulders, their eyes glaring in horror and alarm mixed with 
anguish, that doubtless drove the tears down their cheeks, 
and caused the white foam to burst forth upon their chests 
and flanks, and a dense vapor arose from their reeking bodies, 
like a cloud. 

I observed a movement going on within the circle which I 
could not at all comprehend, and I asked Glenlyon if he knew 
* what it meant ? 

" Oh yes. Look closely. You will see that all the old bulls 
are passing up to that part of the ring which faces the gap. 
There they are concentrating their strength, and their object 
is to make a 'stamp' there. If you do not know what a 
' stamp ' means, listen. Whenever wild cattle mean to do 
mischief their first action is a series of stamps, beginning with 
the chief of the herd, generally a patriarch of his race, and 
followed by all who mean to join him in whatever he does, to 
let him know they are ready and willing. Iu such a case as 
this, we may conclude there will be few who will refuse to 
join in any effort to release themselves from such au enemy as 
they have near them. The chief sees that the gap is a favor- 
able place for making a bolt ; he has been stamping for some 
minutes to-call all the most determined of the bulls about 
him, and they are working their way up, as well as they can, 
through such a mass so closely huddled together. So soon as 
they all get up, the young bulls will be marshalled in a double 
line, if there be enough of them, to cover the females who are 
on the inside." 

" And will they succeed in getting away ?" I asked. 

" Impossible to say ; that lion knows what he has to do, 
and how to do it ; he may prevent \he stamp from being car- 
ried out. Lions have a singular power in checking the move- 
ments of all animals, and he may succeed in stopping that vast 
herd, even at the last moment. I need scarcely tell you, that 
if the stamp actually become a ' stampedo,' as the Saniards 
call it — that is, if they really commence the run and get off 
full swing, no power which that lion possesses or a hundred 
more, could stop them. If he made the effort, he would be 
gored and trampled to death and to jelly ; but his time to 
check the movement is before it beg'ns, aud I expect, from 
his mode of going to work, he knows that as well as I do. In 
either case he will not go supperless. if they do succeed in 
getting away from him, he will have to take one of the rear- 
most of the herd ; if he stop them effectually, he can take his 
choice of a victim — that is the only difference ; but to a lion 
of taste, and one having a particular wife at home to please 
her caprices, even that difference may be important, as affect- 
ing his domestic peace. She may object to an elderly cow, 
and if he can get no other, you may imagine the black looks 
he will get by what you saw of her way of turning him out to- 
night. Of course, she would prefer a young juicy bull— her 
own tastes and her motherly instincts will tell her he i3 better 
food for her and her young toothless ones than the dry and 
flavorless flesh of his grandmother." 

"I cannot conceive how one animal, even if it be a lion, 
can succeed in arresting the progress of that vast body of 
powerful creatures, if they are resolved upon flying from 
him." 

" I suppose not ; and there are many others like you, yet it 
is possible. I have often seen it, and, from what I see of this 
lion, I expect I shall this night witness the same thin?. He 
is no fool, depend upon it, though he looked foolish when his 
lady pinched, with her great teeth, that portion of his royal 
person given him to sit down upon ; you or I might look 
foolish if assailed in the rear, unexpectedly, in that fashion. 



However, we shall see — aud we shall have but a short time to 
wait — for I see the oldest bulls are nearly all up, and their 
council will be but a brief one." 

" Well, if ever he stops them from bolting — that is, if they 
are inclined to run — I will eat him. It is against common 
stnse." 

" Do not be rash — Jephtha made a vow and repented it — 
and you might find that lion hard to digest. As to the how 
he will do it, 1 will not presume to bay anything about it ; 
but mark what I do say — he will do it! I see it. is iu him, 
and what is in him will come out, upon a great occasion like 
this. He will remember the lovely wife at home, and he will 
ask himself what is the risk of be trampled upon by these 
creatures, although they are legion, to a certainty of being 
worried, tooth and nail, by a vixen at home?" 

" But it is physically impossible." 

" I have heard that before. Indeed, I have heard a good 
deal of argument, but the proof has always been furnished by 
the lion. Men say much — nothing that is new or true — lions 
say nothing, but they do all that is required — my faith rests 
on the lions." 

And sure enough the " physical impossibility," as I sup- 
posed it, was being done before my eyes. The herd had got 
itself massed into as dense a body as could be formed. At 
first the animals were huddled together without order — heads 
here and there, and in all directions — but at some signal — 
some variation in the stamping, probably — every head was 
turned in the same direction, and that was toward the spot 
where the oldest bulls were collected ; at last, as I have said, 
was immediately before the gap or opening between the two 
banks. The opening might be about from fifty to sixty yards. 
Every head was raised over the back of the beast that stood 
before it, and, inch by inch, the animals crept up to each 
other, until they were in a dense column. All waited, as it 
seemed to us, only for the oue remaining signal to be given — 
that for rushing forward. The centre bulls in front were rais- 
ing their heads and lowering them alternately, as if preparing 
for the onward dash ; there was but one in that centre which 
stood still ; that is to say, he did not toss his head as the 
others did, he rather seemed to be intently listening, or as if 
trying earnestly to ascertain if all in his own rear, and through- 
out the living mass, were quite leady for the start, before he 
should give the final signal. 

This was the position when the lion slowly appeared in front 
of the column, for the body was now more in the form of a 
column than of a circle, as it had origiually been. The lion, 
as I have said, appeared in front — that is to say, at the right- 
hand angle of the column — about eight, or it might be ten, 
yards from the front. He stood a moment, as if glaring upon 
the outside beast, which he directly faced, and then he slowly 
and side-long moved till he faced the next, where he also made 
a brief pause ; and thus ho continued till he had passed along 
the whole line. This done, the whole column seemed to have 
no power to move ; it stood riged and fixed, as if suddenly 
petrified into stone by that earnest gaze ; each beast of the 
front row leaning back till the forelegs assumed a sloping 
position, and the feet were firmly planted in rather than on 
the earth. It was a singular sight to behold. Each head was 
held high and drawn back, every eye seemed glaring with hor- 
ror, and the wreaths of vapor that issued from, and curled 
above, their distended nostrils, showed how spasmodically they 
breathed. *Tbey were indeed 'awed into obedience, and mo- 
tionless from terror. 

Still the lion did not think his work complete. Before, he 
had moved laterally from the right to the left angle of the col- 
umn, the front of which he " dressed," to use a military 
phrase, as well as any martinet could desire, as he paused in 
front of each individual beast, to whom he presented his own 
full front. Now he proceeded to repeat the lateral movement 
from left to right, in just the same manner as before, pausing 
before each animal as he had done previously, standing a brief 
space before each, till he had reached the last bull in the front 
rank. Arrived there, he gave the loudest roar which I had 
ever beard from any beast — but my experience was then lim- 
ited — and that roar was repeated, when the vapor that arose 
from the dense mass of cattle ascended slowly, but in a quan- 
tity which showed how they all perspired in their agony of 
terror. 

" What think you of a lion's power now, Common-Sense ?" 
said Glenlyon, in a whisper. 

I was silent, indeed my astonishment kept me speechless, 
and at the same time, I confess that shame at my rash observa- 
tions might have had something to do with it. I could not 
remove my telescope from the beast, and I saw him go down 
the side of the column, still moving laterally, and presenting 
his full front to every creature he passed. I fancied he was 
going round the entire body, and was thinking it would oc- 
cupy some time if he did so, when my companion again whis- 
pered : 

" See, he has made his choice : now watch him." 

I did so. Just as Glenlyon began to whisper, the lion had 
stood somewhat longer than he had before the last beast he 
passed, and he drew back about a yard, giving the earth at the 



same moment a mighty strike with his fore-paw. Having 
waited about half a minute, as near as I could guess, he re- 
peated the stroke with more violence than before, and uttered 
a fearful roar, and drew himself farther back. The animal to 
which he thus addressed himself seemed involuntarily to dart 
forward a step, and then as if in great terror to retreat again 
into the rank he'had quitted. But this was not what the lion 
meant to be. He gave a heavier stroke than any with his foot, 
and then laid himself down in the attitude which lions always 
assume when they intand to make a spring ; then the tyrant 
seemed to wait the effect of this manifest threat. 

Too well the trembling victim seemed to comprehend the 
power before him. Slowly, and with timid hesitation, he 
moved one foot forward — it was but a short step he made, but 
the other foot seemed to totter after it — not placing it before 
the first, but on a level with it. The lion must have been in- 
tently glaring with his own eyes into those of the victim, but 
that of couse we could not see, we could only feel it must be 
so. Another feeble step was taken, followed as before by the 
other foot being placed on a level with it, and then it was that 
the art of the tyrant was cunningly manifested. Seeing that 
these two steps had, short though they were, nearly brought 
half the body of the young bull out of the rank, he raised him- 
self gently from the ground, and took two steps backward, so 
that the trembling victim might come entirely out without be- 
ing further terrified by coming so very near to him. The 
movement, as no doubt it was intended to do, seemed to give 
a slight encouragement to the bull, for he slowly stepped in 
the same manner as before, quite out of the rank, and, the in- 
stant h« did so, the lion quickly stepped, catlike, on one side, 
farther from the gap through which he desired the animal to 
go in his rear, then a bark, rather than a roar, so suddenly that 
the sharp noise, together with another powerful stroke with 
his paw on the ground, made the bull dart forward quickly to- 
ward the head of the column, the lion following him up closely 
behind, to prevent him from turning and going along the front 
rank. As he reached the angle formed by the side and front 
of the mass, he uttered another more furious roar, struck the 
earth with his paws with great force and rapidity three times, 
and the unfortunate bull bounded through the gap just be- 
neath us 1 

On went the lion after him. 

" He will have to travel at a slower rate than that which 
brought him here," said Glenlyon, " we need not follow him 
directly. The bull will give him some trouble yet, but, if he 
is ever so tractable, he will not go fast, and we can soon get 
up with them. Better stay a few minutes to see how that 
mass of blockheads recover their scattered senses. Here is a 
proof, if any were needed, that fear ou one side makes an easy 
conquest for the other side." 

Fully ten minutes elapsed ere the chief bull of the herd be- 
gan to shift bis position, the rest not venturing to stir till he 
did. He was the leader — their duty was to obey. Some of 
the youug bulls grew impatient, but a poke from the horn of 
some sedate cow brought them to their senses, and they were 
still again. At length the leader moved one step forward. 
He listened ; nothing seemed to alarm him ; he stamped his 
feet, other bulls did the same, and then all the heads were 
pointed toward him as he wheeled round the angle of the col- 
umn, and thence dashed on in a mad gallop over the broad 
savannah, in the opposite course to that taken by the lion, and 
were soon lost to our view. They had escaped. Little they 
recked of the poor victim they had so meekly surrendered, or 
of the tortures he was enduring in that midnight journey to 
death. In this world few think of the sufferings of others, if 
they escape suffering themselves. 

" llitcbj," called Glenlyon. Ilitcbj was fast asleep. The 
lion might eat all the beef in the herd, for ought he cared ; 
but one magical word aroused him, and brought him grinning 
to us. " Schnapps " was the potent signal to recall his slum- 
bering faculties— the " optn sesame" to his understanding — 
such as it was. It was rather a singular fact, that when the 
Kaffirs were once assured we did not dine off them, we could 
never find one that wished to get away from us. If we asked 
them why they did not go, the reply was, " Like raoosch bes- 
ser ztop — goot to ztop — run away no goot — no moosch blenty 
eat— no zshnapp— tarn bat, dat, eh ? It became proverbial 
among our men that when a Kaffir got into the camp or barr 
racks he never knew when to go, and the men would add, 
" they are such funny little beggars, one can't kick 'em out, 
it's a pity to hurt 'em." 

In half an hour after Glenlyon and I left the bank on which 
we had rested, we got up to llitchj. He was about two hun- 
dred yards in the rear of tho lion, who had his " hands full." 
The young bull was a lusty fellow, and a handsome specimen 
of his race. Ho had no fancy for being driven, and did not 
pin his faith on lions. Every now and then he would try to 
make a bolt with much persistency, but the power of the lion 
was most wonderful in stopping him. When the bull would 
make a sweep in the form of an arc, in order to avoid his per- 
secutor, and to get back to those he loved, the lion did not 
put himself greatly out of the way. His eyes were alway? 
upon his prey, and thus he detected the slightest attempt at 

[continued on the 10th paqe.] 



4 



The California!!. 



LITERARY GOSSIP AND GLEANINGS. 

MR. SWINBCRNES " SOXO OF ITALY." 

THE London Athena?um thinks tbat the key to this remark- 
able poem, may be found in the supposition that the 
singer is probably meant to be understood, not aa the English 
poet in person, but a3 an Italian patriot, a Roman by birth, 
and a republican in creed. The Al/ienceum says : 

" A cry of Mazzini, Mazzini, Yiva Mazzini ! is the burtLen 
of his song, the reason of its being, and the sole element of 
its life. In such a singer as we have supposed, this strain 
would be dramatically true. A Roman patriot, a professor of 
extreme opinions, would be sure to regard the Italian exile as 
the hightest expression of his country's genius. Praise which, 
coming from English lips, would be rebuked as fantastical and 
extravagant, would be received from him as the genuine lan- 
guage of political admiration, even though it might be regarded 
as undeserved. The praise would be dramatically true. 

The conception of some such singer of the 1 Song of Italy ' 
is, in fact, the reader's chief difficulty ; for many things in the 
poem, otherwise black as night, become plaiu enough the mo- 
ment it is made clear that it is not Mr Swinburne who chants 
and rhapsodizes, but a fiery Italian partisan of Signor Maz- 
zini's ideas. For instance, England is abused, and France de- 
nounced on grounds which an Englishman would hardly un- 
derstand, still less admit to be just. Again, the pressure of 
the poem is against the Pope, in favor ol Mazzini ; and the 
praises lavished on the Roman triumvir are pitched in a high 
key enough to draw shrieks of horror from our trading re 
spectabilities. If our theory is good as to this dramatic de 
sign of the' Song of Italy,' Mr. Swinburne will have a perfect 
right to deny his responsibility tor much of the sentiment ut- 
tered by the imaginary Italian poet." 

The poem opens in a powerful, though rather rhapsodical 
lyric strain, with a vision of freedom revealed to the poet in 
the watches of the night. There is a certain pomp and splen- 
dor iu the language which cannot fail to produce an effect even 
upon minds to which it conveys no very distiuct image of the 
majestic vision : 

Upon a windy night of stare that fell 

At the wind's spoken spell, 
Swept the sharp strokes of agonizing light 

from the dear gulf of night, 
Between the fixed and fallen glories one 

Against my vision shone, 
More fair and fearful and diviue than they 

That measure night and day, 
And worthier worship ; and within miDe eyes 

The formless folded skies 
Took shape and were unfolded like as flowers ; 

And I beheld the hours 
As maidens, and the days as laboring men, 

And the soft nights again 
As weired women to their own souls wed, 

And ages as the dead, 
And over these living, and them that died, 

From one to the other side 
A lordlier light than comes ot earth and air 

Made the world's future fair. 
A woman like to love in face, but not 

A thing of transient lot— 
And like to hope, but having bold on truth — 

And like to joy or youth, 
Save that upon the rock her feet were set— 

And like what men forget. 
Faith, inuocenee, high thought, laborious peace — 

And jet like none of tbese, 
Being not as these are, mortal, but with eyes 

That sounded the deep skies 
And clove like wings or arrows their clear way 

Through night and dawn and day — 
So fair a presence over star and suu 

Stood, making these as one. 

An apostrophe to Mazzini, opens thus : 

But tbon. though all were not well done, O chief, 

Must thou take shame or grief? 
Because one man is not as thou or ten, 

Must thou take shame for men ? 
Because the supreme sunrise is not yet, 

Is the young dew not wet ? 
Wilt thou not ye* abide a little while, 

Soul withont fear or guile, 
Mazzini— O our prophet, O our priest, 

A little while at least T 
A little hour ot doubt and of control, 

Sustain thy sacred soul ; 
Withhold thine heart, our father, bat an honr, 

Is it not here, the flower, 
Is it not blown and fragrant from the root, 

And shall not be the fruit t 
Thy children, even thy people thou hast made, 

Thine, with thy words arrayed, 
Clothed with thy thoughts and girt with thy desires, 

Yearn up toward thee as fires. 
Art thou not father, O father, of all these f 

From thine own Genoese 
To where of nights the lower extreme lagune 

Feels its Venetian moon : 
Nor suckling's month nor mother s breast set free, 

But hath that grace through thee. 
The milk of life on death's uunatural brink 

Thou gavest them to drink, 
The natural milk of freedom ; and again 

They drank, and they were men. 
The wine and honey of freedom and of faith 

They drank, and cast oft death. 
Bear with them now ; thou art holier ; yet endure, 

Till they as thou be pure. 

We pass to Garibaldi for a moment : 

Thou too, O splendor cf the sudden sword 

That drove the crews abhorred 
From Naples and the siren footed strand, « 

Flash from thy master's band, 
Shine from the middle summer of the seas 

To the old jEolideB, 
Outshine their fiery flames* of burning night, 

Sjword wjth thy midday light, 
Flame as a beacon from the Tyrrhene foam 
' To the rent heart of Home, 
From the ilund of her lover and thy lord, 

Her saviour and her sword 
In the fierce year of failure and of fame, 

Art thou not yet the same 
That wert as lightning swifter than all wings 

In the blind face of kings ? 
When priests took counsel to devise despair, 

And princes tu forswear, 



She clasped thee. O ber sword and flag-bearer 

And stall and shield to her, 
O Garibaldi : need was bers and grief, 

Of thee and of the chief, 
And of another girt in arms to stand 

As good of hope and hand, 
As high of 6onl aud happy, albeit indeed 

The heart should burn and bleed, 
So but the spirit shake not, nor the breast 

Swerve, but abide its rest. 

The following passionate apostrophe to Rome is exceedingly 
powerful : 

O priestleas Rome that shalt be. take in trust 

Their names, their deeds, their dust, 
Who held life less than thou wert ; be the least 

To thee indeed a priest, 
Priest and burnt-offering and blood-sacrifice 

Given without prayer or price. 
A holier immolation thau meu wist, 

A costlier eucharist, 
A sacrament more saving ; bend thine head 

Above these many dead 
Once, and salute with thine eternal eyes 

Their lowest head that lies. 
Speak from thy lips of immemorial speech 

If hut oue word for each. 
K^b but one kiss on each thy dead sous' mouth 

Fallen dumb or north or south. 
And laying but once thiue hand on brow and breast, 

Bless thein, through whom thou art blest. 
And saying in ears of these thy dead, " Well done," 

Shall they not hear, "O son ?" 
And bowing thy face to theirs made pale for thee, 

Shall the shut eves not see 1 
Tea. through the hollow-hearted world of death, 

As light, as blood, as brevth, 
Shall there not Hash and glow the fiery sense, 

The pulse of prescience T 
Shall not these know as in times overpast 

Thee loftiest to the last ? 
For times and wars shall change, kingdoms and creeds 

And dreams of men, and deeds: 
Earth shall grow gray with all her golden things, 

Pale peoples and hoar kings ; 
But though her throne* and towers of nations fall, 

Death has no part t» all ; 
In the air, nor in the imperishable sea, 

Nor heaven, uor truth, nor thee. 
Yea, let all sceptre-stricken nations lie, 

But live thou though they die; 
Let their flags fade as flowers that storms can mar, 

But thine be like a star ; 
Let England's, if it float not for men free, 

Fall, and forget the sea ; 
Let Fiance's, if it shadow a hateful head, 

Drop as a leaf drops dead ; 
Thine let what storm soever smite the rest 

Smite as it seems bini best ; 
Thine let the wind that can, by sea or land, 

Wrest from thy hauuer-hand. 
Die they in whom dies freedom, die and cease, 

Though the world weep tor these ; 
Live thou and love and lift when these be dead 
The green and white aud red. 

Portions of the following fervid and lofty glorification of 
Italy aud Rome are remarkable for strength and splendor of 
expression, while in other portions we are able to perceive 
nothing but the swing and majesty of the rhythm and the 
pomp and magnificence of the language that swells and sub- 
sides like a strain of martial music : 
Itahkl by the passion of the pain 

That bent aud rent thy chain ; 
Italia ! by the breaking of the bands, 

The shaking of the lands ; 
Beloved, O men s mother, 0 men's queen, 

Arise, appear, be seen ! 
Arise, array thyself in manifold 

Queeu's raiment of wrought gold: 
With girdles of green freedom, aud with red 

Roses, and white snow shed 
Above the -flush and frontage of the hills 

That all thy deep dawn tills 
And all thy clear night veils and warms with wings 

Spread till the morning sings ; 
The rose of resurrecti >n. aud the bright 

ISreast lavish of the light, 
The lady lily like the snowy sky 

Ere the stars wholly die ; 
As redaB blood,, and whiter thau a wave, . 

Flowers grown as from thy g-ave, 
From the green fruitful grass iu Maytime hot, 

Thy grave, where thou art not. 
Gather the grasB and weave, in sacred sign 

Of the ancient earth divine, 
The holy heart of things, the seed of birth, 

The mystical warm earth, 
O thou her flower ot flowers, with treble braid 

Be thy sweet bead arrayed, 
In witness of her mighty motherhood 
Who bore thee aud found thee good, 
Her fairest-born of-euildren, on whose head 

Her green and white and red 
Are hope and light aud life, inviolate 

Of anv latter fate. 
O our Republic that shall blind in bands 

The kingdomless far lauds 
And link the cbainless ages ; thou that wast 

With England ere she past 
Among the fud.-.l na'.iocs. aud shalt be 

Again, when sea to sea 
Calls through the wind and light of morning time, 

And throueless clime i . clime 
Make6 antiphonal answer ; thou that art 

With one man's perfect heart 
Burns, oue man's brow is brightened for thy sake, 

Thine, strong to make or break ; 
O fair Republic hallowing with stretched hands 

The limitless free lands. 
When all men's beads for love, not fear, bow down 

To thy sole royal crown, 
As though to freedom, when men's life smells sweet, 

And at thy bright swift feet 
A bloodless and a bondless world is laid : 

Then, when thy men are made. 
Let these indeed as we in dreams behold 

One chosen ot all thy fold, 
One of all fair things fairest, one exalt 
Above all fear or fault 



Equal with heaven, aud infinite years, 

And splendid from quenched tears ; 
Strong with old strength of great things fallen and fled, 

Diviner for her dead : 
Chaste of all stains and perfect from all scars, 

Above all storms and stars. 
All winds that blow through time, all waves that foam, 

Our Capitoliau Rome. 

The Athenceum concludes its review of the poem as fol- 
lows : 

" Though the form of this ' Song of Italy ' is dramatic, and 
the singer an Italian, we have no doubt that, on the whole, 
Swinburne has, in t he foregoing verses, mainly .expressed his 
own ideas. The desire to do justice to Mazzini is becoming a 
note of high and poetic natures. Whatever onr trading res- 
pectabilities may think on the subject, our young men of ideas 
leel that he, chiefly, has made Italy into a nation. Remem- 
bering that our own Milton was proscribed, that onr own Sid- 
ney was exiled, they affect— and wisely affect — to care little 
for the accidents ot contemporary politics. They Cud in him 
a great thinker and teacher, and perhaps there is not much 
harm done when their proud resentment against bis wrongs 
carries the sympathetic admiration of bis genius and bis ser- 
vice into some excess. Youth justifies a noble generosity." 

DR. THRALL'S JCSSAY ON THE KPI8COPATK, AS THB MISSIONARY 

ORDER OF THE CHURCH. 

Dr. S. C. Thrall, formerly rector of Trinity Church in tbia 
city, and one of tbe most learned theologians in tbe United 
States, has recently published an essay entitled " The Episco- 
pate the Missionary Order of *,he Church," which cannot fail 
to attract a considerable share of attention iu the Episcopal 
Communion. 

Doctor Thrall declares that tbe Church has failed " in her 
work of gathering in the nations," and thinks that tbe source 
of the failure is to be found " in the maladjustment of tbe 
offices ot the Churcb, and the relation of ber officers," and in 
" the disturbance of the true relation of the Episcopate by the 
usurpations of tbe Papacy." In bis preface, tbe writer says : 

" To state concisely the great misfortune of the whole Re- 
formed Church, it is that she has inherited from tbe Papacy a 
practically mutilated Episcopate, a Papal Episcopate without 
a Pope. The powers of the Episcopate which the Bishop of 
Rome gradually stole away from other bishops, have been left 
with him, and never resumed. When we consider that the 
specific work of the Church of God is to disciple tbe nations, 
and that the Reformed Churcb in ten generations has lost to 
heresy, schism and the world at least tbree-fourtbs of the de- 
scendants of her own children, and more than ten times, 
probably more tbsn one hundred times, as many as she has 
gained from the world, it must be conceded tbat the Reformed 
Church is in this part of ber work one of tbe most illustrious 
failures of Christendom. The author has meditated a review 
of the causes of this failure, a full statement of the facts, tbe 
tracing them to their proper source, wbicb be believes to be 
primarily tbe maladjustment of tbe relations of tbe offi- 
ces of the Church. This would involve a consideration of 
the history of the Reformed Church, and a tracing cf the steps 
by which the Episcopates of primitive times came to be by 
the encroachments ol the Bishop of Rome and tbe interfer- 
ence ot the secular power such a piece of pure, ecclesiastical 
mechanism for merely perfunctory uses as it is at this day. 
Such a work be believes to be greatly needed ar this time. 
He has alluded to it hen? only that be might not be thought 
to have been ignorant of bow large a subject that was on the 
borders of which only he had come. 1J is excuse is that when 
be wrote, now ten months since, he wrote with a view to one 
branch ot tbe subject, and for a particular purpose." 

The main argument of the essay, is designed to show that 
the Episcopate, as distinct from tbe other orders, is " the 
missionary order of the Church ;" that Bishop3 are the proper 
ones personally to do this work, and that the pastoral work 
belongs properly in the economy of the Churcb, to tbe second 
order. We shall give some extracts from the essay itself, next 
week*. 



One unforgetful or nnhappier men 

And us who loved her then ; 
With eyes that outlook suns aud dream on graves ; 

With* voice like quiring waves : 
With heart the holier for their memories' sake 

Who slept tbat she might wake ; 
With breast tbe sweeter for that sweet blood lost, 

And all the milkless cost; 
Lady of earth, whose large equality 

i? .vjU but to her and tbse ; 



Good Digestion. — Men who succeed need not have any 
subtile minds, or brilliant imaginations, or marvelous powers 
of industry. Some industry, some imagination, and some 
acuteness are, doubtless, indispensable. Bat the one indis- 
pensable factor is a good digestion. Tbe laborious man and 
the industrious man is often of an atrabilious temperament, 
gloomy and austere ; or he is nervous, fidgetty, aoxioas and 
fretful. In neither case is he successful. He may consume 
gallons of midnight oil on some very clever or very learned 
book, but after being a three weeks' lion, he will find himself 
supplanted in the homage of society by his own book, or by 
some sharp, quick-witted, off-hand spark, who picks his brains, 
repeats his sayings, appropriates his facts or his inferences, 
and gains all the credit that is really doe to the genius and 
ndustry of a discontented dyspeptic. Who is the successful 
man? Tbe man with a good stomach, ample barrel, broad 
face, glowing cheeks, and a ruddy smile, which may denote 
good-humor, sympathy, or perfect indifference. Who does not 
know the "capital good fellow" of society, with bis rosy 
gills, habitual smile, and white teeth ; his little innuendoes, 
and his significant looks, indicating that be knows your latest 
secret and last-formed plans ? 



Love can excuse anything except meanness ; bat meanness 
kills love, cripples even natural affection : without esteem, 
true love cannot exist. 

Men, in general, are more completely persuaded by the sug« 
geBtions of their own minds, than by reasons offered tbem by 
others. 



The California!!. 



5 



DRAMATIC AFFAIRS- 

ON Monday, Miss Helen Western and a large proportion 
of the stock company of Maguire's Opera House went 
to Sacramento. In the evening, Mrs. C. R. Saunders, the 
favorite low-comedy actress, made ber first appearance since her 
return from the East, playing "Nancy Strap" in the farce of 
The Pleasant Neighbor. The Martinetti Troupe change their 
base on Monday and appeared, after tbe farce, in gymnastic 
exerciser and feasts of strength. The performance concluded 
with the pantomime of The Red Gnome, which was well put 
upon the stage and well played. This bill with but little alteration 
wa3 presented until last night, when the fine spectacular extrav- 
aganza entitled The Elves was produced. The favorite actress, 
Miss Sallie Hinckley, made her reappearance on the stage of the 
Opera House on this occasion, as " Sylvia," and pretty Miss 
Alicia Mandeville Thorne made her first appearance since her 
return from the East as " Eoline," Mrs. Sophie Edwin played 
" Prince Lubin" and Mrs. U. R. Saunders appeared in the 
comic part of " Phillis." The Martinetti Troupe with their 
fine ballet company appeared in beautiful ballets and in their 
great gymnastic and athletic exercises in the "fete" scene. 
The play concluded with a magnificent illuminated tableau. 
This afternoon and evening this attractive performance wilj 
be repeated and will probably run for mauy nights. 

Leslie aud Raynor, the talented minstrels, (late of Christy's 
Minstrels,) have made a hit at the Metropolitan Theater. 
Large and fashionable audiences have been in attendance every 
uight this week. The performance is a good one throughout, 
though the choruses in the " First Part " would be better if 
the company were strengthened by the addition of two or three 
more voices. However, good voices are not easily obtained in 
these operatic times. Harry Leslies singing and acting are 
admirable, and he has a good stock of amusing jokes. His 
song " In the Rain," proved very popular. Harry Raynor's 
greatest hit -is his performance on the Japanese fiddle, a dia- 
bolical one-stringed instrument, from which he draws the most 
excruciating sounds, expressing the agony they cause him by 
wonderfully funny facial coutortions. Leslie and Raynor are 
very good in their negro acts, those entitled " Tragedy Re- 
hearsed " and " The Rhinoserous," never fail to convulse the 
audience with laughter. A grand matinee will be given this 
afternoon, and a capital bill has been prepared for this evening. 
Next week the burlesque opera of Marilana, which has been 
in rehearsal for a week past, will be produced. To ensure the 
representation of this capital burlesque — one of the best per- 
formed by Christy's Minstrels — in unexceptionably good style, 
Henri Herberte, the fine English Tenor, who has delighted the 
public on many occasions of late, and Miss Julia Gould, the 
clever singer and burlesque actress, have been engaged. These 
operatic burlesques are sure to prove popular. Messrs. Leslie 
and Raynor's repertory comprises burlesques on all the best 
operas ol the day, including L' Africaine. 

On Munday, the Japanese Mikado Troupe of seventeen 
male and female artistes will make their appearance at the 
Academy of Music. The performances of these artistes will 
consist of slack rope walking, tub balancing, conjuring, etc- 
Yoshigeeroo, the Yedo Hercules, assisted by his family will 
perform wonderful balancing feats, Toroonoski, the Japanese 
Blondin, will construct a ladder of paper in the presence of the 
audience, and, ascending it, perform on it — Japanese paper 
must be pretty good — better than that of some of our mer- 
chants. He will accomplish other strange feats. Tzenageero 
will walk barefooted up a ladder of swords placed edge upper- 
most. The above enumerated feats will give some idea of the 
quality of this troupe. 

Edwin Adams is at present on his way to San Francisco, 
and will appear at Maguire's Opera House. The Great 
Dragon Troupe of Japanese jongleurs, balancers, slack rope 
ascensionists and musical and dancing girls from the Great 
Dragon Theater, Osaca, are expected to arrive daily, and will 
probably appear at the Metropolitan Theater. The public 
will probably again have an opportunity afforded them of 
judging of the respective merits of two troupes at the same 
time. 

Mrs. Laura Cuppy will deliver a lecture as usual to morrow 
evening ac Mechanics' Institute Hall, and will, at the request 
of the Eight Hour Leugue, deliver an address at the same 
place on Monday evening, ou the conclusion of the other ex- 
ercises of the day. Touchstone. 

Woodward's Gardens. — The children all have a holiday at 
present and picnics are in vogue. No more delightful spot 
for a picnic than Woodward's Gardens can be found. The 
children delight in looking at the bears and the animals and 
riding on the camel. 

Pacific Museum. — The numerous wonders to be seen here 
please and surprise all who see them. The many thousands 
of dollars expended on this collection have produced an im- 
mense exhibition. 

The cultivation of some souls is merely local, as if you 
should rub a dry log in one spot to produce fire, all the rest 
remaining cold. 



Queen Victoria's Book. — Queen Victoria, says a London 
correspondent, has written a work entitled " Leaves from a 
Journal in the Highlands," which consists of about forty 
papers, descriptive of her life at Balmoral and the neighbor- 
hood. The work is illustrated by photographs and wood cuts 
from her majesty's sketches. It contains, among other inter- 
esting matter, three long accounts of her incognito journeys 
made by the prince consort and herself to different parts of 
Scotland, aud the adventures which they met with. In one 
of the papers she gives an account of the preaching of Dr. 
Norman McLeod, of Glasgow, and after stating how aston- 
ished she was that any one could preach " so eloquently and 
touchingly without notes," she adds, "and then he prayed so 
kindly for me and the prince in the after prayer that I was 
deeply touched ; but when he invoked God's blessing on the 
children, I felt a great lump come in my throat." She had 
not expected to be prayed for so kindly by a Presbyterian, 
and least of all did she expect him to remember the children. 
I think there is something touching in this simple note of the 
queen-wife and mother, which shows how true a woman she 
is. Only forty copies of the work have been printed for spe- 
cial friends and favorites, but sooner or later it will of course 
be reprinted, and will be a most interesting addition to con- 
temporary literature. What would the world not give for 
such a work by Queen Mary or Queen Elizabeth ? The copy 
from which I have quoted bore on the title-page the follow- 
ing inscription : 

"To dear Jeannie G , in remembrance of many, many 

happy hours — gone never to return again, from V. R." 

New Music. — We "have received from M. Gray, the music 
publisher, 613 Clay street, the following pieces of new music 
received by the last steamer: " Early in the morning, Merrily 
Oh ; or, Pretty Little Sarah," as sung by Kelly and Leon's 
Minstrels. " Queen of the night," a serenade, as sung by Mrs. 
George Simpson ; words by Geo. Cooper, music by J. R. 
Thomas. " If I Had But Two Little Wings," words, by 
Coleridge, from the Germau, music by H. Perabeau. The 
favorite Irish Melody, " Pat Malloy," with brilliant variations 
for the piano, by TltfO. Mcellins, and the beautiful song " I 
am Lonely To-uight," arranged with variations, by the same 
author. This musical feast will draw all the musical young 
ladies of. San Francisco — and all our prettiest young ladies 
are musical — to Gray's store on Clay street. 

A Chance fob Economical Ladies. — The ladies of San Francisco 
are often accused of being extravagant iu dress, aud no doubt many 
are. There are, however, thousands who want an opportunity to pur- 
chase a drees at a low rate instead of buying the latest imported goods 
without reference to cost. A capital opportunity is offered the econo- 
mically inclined at the present time. The great dry goods house of 
Meagher, Taaffe & Co., are offering at their retail store, 9 Montgomery 
street, certain descriptions of goods at from 20 to 40 per cent, less than 
cost of importation. These goodsare of superior quality andof the most 
useful description. A bluck silk dre9s is, as every lady knows, always 
fasbonable. Meagher, Taaffe &. Co. are selling pieces of good black dress 
silk at.$l aud $1 25, and other of the finer qualities from $2 50 to $8' 
Housekeepers should carefully read and ponder on the advertisement 
which appears in anothereolunin. Large houses like that of Meagher, 
Taaffe in Co. , frequently become overstocked with goods aud are 
compelled to turn them into cash at a eacritice. 

Fok Health, go to the Hot Springs, bathe in and drink the waters, 
whose odor remindelh of aged eggs ; wallow in mud springs until 
your slimy person shall resemble the crawiing reptiles of a Louisiana 
bayou ; battle with the flies and mosquitoes, and be suffocated with 
the pulverized clay of the country j fail to realize your wishes, and be 
digusted with the result of your enterprise, and then call upon Dr. 
Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple, who, from his long experience, skill and 
practical knowledge, guarantees cures in almost all cases, aud thus re- 
cover the treasure of lost health. " * 

Keller's Wines. — Keller's wines have stood the test for years of 
public opinion, and tbe committees of all tbe Fairs have awarded tbe 
premium on them over other competitors. The Front street merchants 
have their orders tilled iu cases from Keller's wine cellar, comer of 
Washington and Battery streets ; whi le families are supplied (by the 
case) with the best quality of Old White Wine, Sherry, Maderia, and 
Port. Drinkers of Maderia Wine should sample Keller's Maderia, 
which, in flavor, is like the Old Tenneriffi. 

Pokk Trimmings. — Where is the housekeeper that will not get all 
the pork they can for a shilling, and Wilson & Stevens at the corner 
of Market Sutter and Sausome streets gives more pork for a shilling 
than any other establishment. This is the place for both the rich and 
the poor to buy tbeir meats. It comes fresh every day from their ex- 
tensive slaughter house at Black Point. 

Horses and dogs are quadrupeds, and there the similarity ends. 
Just so with Baths. The Russian, Turkish, Persian, Greek, Irish or 
Digger Indian Baths, are no more like Dr. Bourne's Baths than are 
horses and dogs. Dh. Bourne's Baths are universally acknowledged 
by all competent judges to be superior to all others in their admirable 
effect upon the system, in health or disease * 

We do not belive in "cure-alls" until we tried Ayer's inimitable 
Pills, and now we think the whole secret lies iu the fact, that purga- 
tives are the natural remedy for disease, and Dr. Ayer has made the 
best of purgatives. They cure all our complaints— Logan (O) Press. 

" Dr. Bourne's Baths." — The uniform testimony is, that as a lux- 
ury, or for the cure of ailments, they are unequalled— No. 10 Masonic 
Temple, Post street. 

Electricity.— Four bite for the use of the powerful electric-mag- 
netic battery of Dr. Bourne, 10 Masouic Temple, Post street. Useful 
iu neuralgia , etc * 



Unprotected Females. — At six in the evening we moved 
off from Beyrout, with an additiou of some hundred pilgrims ; 
and as night came on, beds were spread in such numbers oi 
the deck that we had but a narrow strip to walk up and down 
in. The devout Mussulmans had scarce room to say their 
prayers, but say them they did, diving their turbans, as they 
prostrated themselves, into the faces and laps of sleeping 
groups. One of these groups, which occupied a nook near the 
steersman, had very white, clean cushions. Three women, in 
the ample calico envelopes within which these Eastern females 
enclose themselves, were lying down, apparently asleep, in the 
moonlight. When our tea, however, was brought, one of them 
suddeuly started up, and coming toward us, seized a spoon 
that lay in the sugar-bcwl, and, taking a portion, tasted it, 
thinking it salt; then sitting down beside us, she began a 
wild song, finishing with a strange trill, that might have vibra- 
ted a mile over the silent sea. She talked a great deal, and 
gave us each something, orange, nuts, etc. After awhile she 
went away again to her couch, but ever and anon started up 
from it, breaking out into song, and terminating with the trill, 
in alto. She came to us agaiu, frequently hovering round us, 
and addressing each. Meanwhile, a few more of these half- 
wild creatures were amusing themselves by looking down into 
the cabin, their black eyes under the veils making the sippers 
of tea below start when they met their glance. A fast French 
lady, who came on board at Beyrout, was another specimen of 
female loneliness, for our singular Asiatic had come from the 
far interior, and was going to Mecca quite by herself. Madame 
Olympe was a pretty person, quite young, and affecting to be 
a literary character. She had passed, she said, three months 
with the ladies of the harem, and gave us what she assured 
us was a very truthful representation of their life. — Pilgrim- 
age in Eastern Skrines. 

The Next Deluge. — A French work recently published 
maintains that every ten thousand five hundred years the 
waters of the sea pass from one pole to the other, submerg- 
ing and overwhelming, in their passage, the earth and all its 
inhabitants. According to the author of this theory, M. 
Paul de Jouvencel, the last of these deluges occurred four 
thousand years age; the next one is due in six thousand years 
more. M. Jouvencel recounts this great cosmical drama with 
the vigor and pictorial effect of an eye-witness. Six thousand 
years — sixty ceuturies — then only are left to us wherein to do 
our whole world's work, and to complete and perfect the civi- 
lization which has yet hardly dawned upon the greater num- 
ber of mankind ! Sixty old men may touch hands across the 
interval between the present moment and the last hour of the 
world as it exists ; then all will be finished, all cousumed ; all 
will disappear ! the sea for ten thousand five hundred years, 
in its immeasurable depths, will crush out our nistory, and 
leave nothing of it all but a few fossils ! So, at least, says 
M. Jouvencel. 

Why Young Ladies Stare. — An exchange says the reason 
that young ladies seem to have a habit of staring, is simply 
because they cannot help it, as to keep in the fashion they 
are compelled to wear such a bunch of stuff at the back o f 
the head that the natural hair is drawn to the highest tension, 
and as the skin of the forehead is drawn back, the eyelids also 
get an upward tendency that leaves the impression that the 
girls look bold and fierce. It's all a mistake. The dear crea- 
tures are just as gentle and lovable as they ever were, and 
they would be very willing to lower their eyelids if they could 
do so, without lifting the tremendous ball that is bound to tha 
head in such a disadvantageous position. When the water- 
falls get ignored by fashion, the girls will look as meek-eyed as 
they did before the advent of that monstrosity of fashion. 

The School Exercises which have been given during the 
present week, have shown unusual ability and industry on the 
part of those in charge of the various school departments, and 
a great proficiency and advancement on the part of the thou- 
sands of pupils under their charge. There is probably no city 
in the Union that can boast of a more efficient and commend- 
able school department than that of San Francisco. 

No Cholera on the Nicaragua Transit.— A large num- 
ber of passengers by the America, which arrived yesterday, 
testify in a published card to the fact that there is no cholera 
or epidemic of any kind on the Nigaragua Transit. The tele- 
graphic report from the East that the cholera was raging ex- 
tensively in Nigarauga received here some two weeks since, 
was evidently a manufactured one. 

Among the popular errors not to be found enumerated in 
any "Commonplace Book" are these: That editors keep 
public reading-rooms. That they have plenty of time to talk 
to everybody. That they are delighted to get anything to 
fill up the paper with. That every man's own special ax is a 
matter of " public interest." That it doesn't make much dif- 
ference whether copy be written on both sides. 

It is as easy to write a gaudy style without ideas, as it is 
to spread a pallet of showy coiors, or to smear in a flaunting 
transparency. _ 

Eools are the worst of all thieves ; tbey rob us of time and 
temper. 



The Californian 



THE PLAINTIFF NONSUITED. 

A lawyer's story. 

(•<• ENTLEMEN, it is unnecessary, perhaps, for me to 
VJT tell any of my legal brothers here, that the summer 
in Nassau Street is hot ; but I may be allowed to say, in pass- 
ing, that it was very hot in my office in Nassau Street on one 
particular August afternoon, a dozen years since. In fact, I 
was sitting very unprofessionally in my shirt-sleeves, wheu Mr. 

Lockshaw firm of Phillips and Lockshaw— came into the 

office, rather red, and much excited." 

"' Mr. Riley,' said he, 'you must go to Wisconsin to night. 
We have fifteen thousand dollars due us there from Wells & 
Co., and we learn from private advices that they are going to 
sell out, and run away to California. Now what can we do, 
except attach their property V 

" ' Nothing,' I replied, 'and you will be very fortunate if 
yoa do that before they assign.' 

" His finger trembled at this suggestion, as he moved it slow- 
ly over the map ; and, stopping suddenly, he said : ' Here it is, 
on the Fox River, about a day's drive back from Lake Michi- 
gan. There is no town marked on the map, but you can't 
miss it. We will give you a thousand dollars extra, beside 
your expenses and regular fee.' 

" ' Well, Mr. Lockshaw, I suppose there is no use in refus- 
ing, so get your notes ready, and I'll leave on the next traiu.' 

" He had not been gone ten minutes when up came Mr. 
Wolfe, an old friend and client ; and, what was much more im- 
portant to me, the father of Fanny Wolfe, who, according to 
a mutual agreement, was to become Mrs. Riley two months 
from that date. 

"' Well, Riley, I'm glad to find you in,' said he, with some- 
thing of the patronizing air of a prospective father-in-law, 
' you roust go to Wisconsin for me.' 

" ' Wisconsin 1 What is the matter there, sir V 
" 'A good deal,' said he ; ' fifteen thousand dollars at least, 
and hanging by a single thread, too.' 

" ' Fifteen thousand dollars ! What shape is it in ?' said I. 
' Who owes it to you ?' 

" ' Wells & Co.,' he replied. ' Why, what's the matter, 
Riley? Are they friends of yours ?' 

" You will excuse me, gentlemen, for having been so unpro- 
fessional, on this occasion, as to allow my face to betray my 
feelings," said Riley to us, "but I recovered immediately, and 
replied to Wolfe that they were not my friends, and asked him 
where Wells & Co. lived. 

" 'About a day's drive back from Lake Michigan, on the 
Fox River,' said be, 'and you must attach their goods. They 
have a large stock I'm told — some forty thousand dollars' 
worth.' 

'"I am very sorry, Mr. Wolfe, that it so happens,' said I, 
greatly perplexed at the unpleasant position I was in, ' but I 
cannot go for you.' 

•"You must,' said he, positively ; 'Idepeud on it. You 
are not going somewhere else, are you ?' 

'"No, not exactly,' said I, anxiously, for he was not a man 
to be trifled with, and I felt uneasy when I thought of Fanny. 
' But I'm going to be busy — very busy— in fact entirely ab- 
sorbed in a caie for another client.' 

"'Who is it?' said he. ' You must put him off. This is 
too important, and must be attended to. I will give you 
twenty-five hundred dollars and your expenses, if you'll go.' 

" ' But I cannot attend to it. I assure you, unless my other 
clients release me. I will send them a note, and they can de- 
cide while I am getting ready to go.' 

" So I wrote a note to Phillips and Lockshaw, stating the 
case, and urging them to unite with Mr. Wolfe, and let me 
collect on account of both claims, as -Mr. Wolfe said he un- 
derstood there was forty thousand dollars' worth of goods in 
Wells & Co.'s store. 

"When I had finished writing, the errand-boy had. not re- 
turned. Here was a dilemma, for I had no time to see my 
clients in person, and Mr. Wolfe was pacing the room much 
excited. He had long been my client, aud I had made a thou- 
sand dollars from his business where I had a hundred dollars 
from Phillips and Lockshaw ; besides, I was to be one ol his 
family in two months ; but I had been retained by the other 
parties, and professional honor, of course, demanded my ut- 
most exertions in their behalf, against all opponents whatso- 
ever. 

" ' Well,' said he turning sharp oe his heel, seeing me hold- 
ing the note by one corner, 'how is it?' 

" ' Why, my boy is gone, and I cannot get this delivered, 
nor have I time to see them, for I must go off on the next 
train, and need all my time to get ready iu. You must em- 
ploy some other lawyar this time.' 

"' Here,' said he, ' I'll deliver the note.' 

'"No, sir,' said I, fearful of an interview between him and 
Lockshaw ; 'I wouldu't think of allowing you to do that.' 

" ' Yes,' he insisted ; ' pass it over, and I'll deliver it. I'm 
good at skipping these streets. I have done it ever since I 
was big enough to dodge an omnibus. Let me have it, quick !' 
. "I hesitated a moment, theu handed him the note. 



" ' Phillips aud Lockshaw !' said he, his grey eyes snapping, 
and he scowled a little. ' Well, I'll probably be here when 
you get back.' 

" I returned very soon, but he wa3 not there. Phillips and 
Lockshaw were both there, and very red in the face, too, for 
a wholesale firm. 

" ' Did Mr. Wolfe bring a note for me ?' I inquired. 
" ' Yes,' replied my clients, both in the same breath. 
" ' What was your answer ? 

'"Well, you see, he asked me,' said Locksbaw, 'before I 
saw the note, if we could let you off from our engagement, 
whatever it was, for a few days. I told him that we couldn't 
possibly release you, because we wanted you to go to Wiscon- 
sin and attach some good3. The minute I said that, he threw 
down the note and went out of our office almost on a run.' 

" 1 You have defeated yourselves !' said I, to the great ter 
ror of the wholesale firm. ' He will get ahead of us, sure.' 
" ' But you must run !' said Mr. Locksbaw. 
" ' You mustn't sleep nor eat day nor night !' said Phillips 
in his excitement, anxious to contribute his utmost to assist 
me. 

" ' Gentlemen,' said I, ' you had better see Mr. Wolfe, and 
agree to have me collect for all of you. In the mean time, 1 
will get on the train, and you can come there to report.' 

" I had been aboard about ten minutes, when, just as the 
oars were moving off, my clients came running up, and being 
unable to explain in words, they did so by signs ; Mr. Philli 
shaking his bead, which I interpreted to mean that I was to 
neither eat nor sleep, and that he had not agreed with Wolfe. 
Mr. Lockshaw, at the same time, was nodding vigorously, and 
moved me ou with his hand3 ; which I took to mean that he 
approved of me, indorsed my course, wished to convey the 
company's blessings, and desired me, without fail, to outstrip 
Wolfe's man, and circumvent all their enemies. 

" 'A bothering pair,' said I to myself — 'a couple of skrimpy 
patterns, cut out of poor cloth. Both of their bodies and 
brains are not worth the little finger of old Wolfe— the hot- 
head !' 

" I felt unpleasant and dissatisfied ; because, if I succeeded 
in Phillips and Lockshaw's case, I would most likely fail in 
my own suit with Wolfe's daughter, for he was a man of 
strong passion, and Fanny had plenty of her father's spirit 

" What added to my anxiety was the fact that Mr. Wolfe 
had met with some Western losses, and did not feel very 
amiable. He had always relied on me in difficult cases, and I 
felt now as if my position would not be fully understood — that 
he could not. or would not, look on professional honor as I 
did. 

" But the cars soon shook these thoughts out of me, as we 
banged along through dust and dirt all night and next day ; 
and the next night we came into the range of the cool lake 
winds, and so on to Chicago — hungry, flaccid, and sleepy. 

" I had looked through the train for Mr. Wolfe's lawyer, 
but failed to find any one I knew, and concluded that I was 
ahead, thus far at least ; so I registered my uame in full, and 
west to bed. 

" ' My friend,' said I, speaking to the clerk in a style some' 
what prevalent thereabout, as I came down rather late next 
moruing — ' my friend, why didn't you call me as I ordered ? I 
wanted to take the Lake Shore train for Wisconsin.' 

" ' You changed your order, sir,' said the clerk. ' You told 
us you did not want to go.' 

" ' No, sir,' said I, ' begging your pardon, I did not change 
my order.' 

" ' It is so marked here,' he replied, showing me the slate. 
'Order changed— needn't call — stays to-morrow?' 

" ' You have made an entry against the wrong name,' said 1. 
"' This is not the gentleman,' said another clerk, coming 
up. ' The gentleman who changed Mr. Riley's order paid his 
bill, and has taken the Lake shore train. Here is his name — 
C. Wakefield, New York.' 

" Wakefield and I have never met, though he knew Fanny. 
He was undoubtedly Wolfe's lawyer, and had got ahead of me. 
' Cive me my bill, quicker than lightning,' said I. 

'•' But don't you want your breakfast?' replied the clerk; 
' the train has goue.' 
'• ' No, 1 want my bill ; that's all I want in tbis house.' 
" ' It was a mistake, sir, that no one could help,' said be, 
writing. 

" ' I understand what it was,' said I, ' but I'll try to help it, 
if you will give me my bill ' — and, throwing down the money, 
I seized my valise and started. 

" ' Here, take me to the Lake Shore train on a dead ruu, 
and don't stop for anything,' said I to a coachman at tbe foot 
of the stairs. ' 'i'en dollars if you make the train,' I shouted 
through the front window of tbe coach after I got in. He 
did not hear, and I punched him. He came to a dead stop of 
course. 'Ten dollars if you reach the train,' I repeated. It 
is wonderful, now I think of it coolly, what a difference Ihal 
made. He had been figuring it up, and concluded that by 
missing the train he would get a fare back ; but now, by reach- 
ing it, be would get five fares in one. It seemed as if the 
coach and the horses beard my offer, and ioataully put forth 



j individual exertions, somewhat in harmony with the driver, to 
earn the money ; for I commenced rocking, dancing, aud 
jumping about, like an acrobat trying to drive through both 
doors and the front window at one leap. 

" I think the people in the streets must have had a vague 
idea that the coach contained a pair of boots wrestling with a 
hat — the boots being, most of the time, on top. People at 
crossings dodged out of the way in angry amazement, and the 
very dogs ran into the gutters, looking back over their should- 
ers, wondering what ailed tbe coach. 

"' Hold on, driver !' said 1, punching him again. 'I don't 
want a funeral in our family just yet.' 

"'All right,' said be, whipping his horses, thinking I was 
urging him on. 

"'Hold on I hold on! You fool!' I shouted, pulling his 
coat-tails through the window and tugging at them. 'You'll 
kill me.' 

"'Yes,' he yelled, ' I'll kill 'em or make it!' and, jumping 
to his feet, he lashed his horses to the highest pitch, and 
brought me alongside the moving train. 

'• ' Now then !' he cried, tearing open the door ; and jump- 
ing out, I clambered on the platform, and threw down a twen- 
ty dollar bill, which he picked up, tipping his hat iu acknowl- 
edgment. 

" ' Well, Mr. C. Wakefield, what do yoa think of this?' said 
I, soliloquizing as I cuddled down in my seat. ' If I do not 1 
beat you, theu my name is not Riley, and there are no snakes 
in Texas.' 

" I bad hoped, until now, that Wells & Co. would pay np 
and save trouble, or that some sort of a compromise would be 
made between the New York claimants ; but it was idle to 
hope any longer. I must be prepared to meet and overcome 
all sorts of schemes and games; and, as the first discreditable 
trick to detain me in Chicago, by changing my order so that I 
should miss the train, had failed of its object, and exposed 
Mr. C. Wakefield's presence and designs, I must expect'to 
meet almost any obstacle that could be placed in my way for 
a less sum than fifteen thousand dollars. 

" That was the prize for which we now both struggled, and 
half an hour's delay might defeat me ; so I called up the con- 
ductor, and questioned him particnlarly about tbe place where 
we were to stop. I found out where to go for a good dinner> 
the best livery team, and the sharpest lawyer. 

" I walked back to the hind platform of the last car, and 
slipped off with my valise before the train had fairly stopped . 
I went directly to a comfortable little public bouse, lrequented 
by farmers, principally, and, ordering dinner, I immediately 
consulted Mr. Benway, the best lawyer to be found, paying 
him one hundred dollars down, with assurance of more. In 
two hours tbe papers were drawn ; dinner was over, and we 
were riding across the prairie toward Well & Co. ,s store. I 
had fairly distanced Wakefield, and felt good. Added to this 
emotion of triumph was an indiscribable sense of freedom 
from restraint, and an exbilerating feeling of roominess, in 
the wide, grassy , ecboless plain ; and there was a tonic, too, 
in the winds that blew out of the boundless horizon. 

" We were riding along at a rapid pace when I saw a man 
standing on a knoll, some distance to the right, shouting and 
beckoning us that way. 

" It is the sheriff,' said Benway, as we drew near, ' and he has 
got something over in the slough — a deer or a borse-tbief, I'll 
bet, for he is death on both.' 

" We rode up on the rise of ground, and, looking over into 
the slough saw two horses mired, and on tbe other side was a 
man covered with mud, aud limping off through the grass, 
evidently quite lame. 

" • What's the matter ?' said Benway. 
* H That's a counterfeiter,' replied the sheriff. ' I was chas- 
ing him, and we both rode down in there, pell-mell, and got 
mired — blast his pictur.' 

" The counterfeiter's horse had struggled out to our side, 
and was shaking himself. 

"' Here" said the sheriff, taking the horse by the bridle, 
and pulling a pistol from tbe saddle pocket, 'you go round, 
Benway, and head hiin off. No you needn't though, for I un- 
derstand his dodges, and can do better. You stay here ;' — 
and, mounting the counterfeiter's horse, he rode round tbe 
end of tbe slough, a hundred rods off, and came np in front 
of the man, who turned back toward us again. 

"' Now, see here,' said the fellow, cocking a large pistol, 
you'd better keep off.' 

"' No, I guess not,' said the sheriff, ' I think I'd better 
keep on. I've been hunting you too long. I've grown fond of 
you, and fairly hanker after your fascinating face. I couldn't 
think of giving up my game just a3 it is ready to bag, yoa 
know.' 

" ' But you may go into the bag, that's all,' said the man. 
I'll shoot, if you don't keep off.' 
" ' No, now,' replied the sheriff, riding np uearer ; ' you 
wouldn't do that before witnessess.' 

Tbe fellow looked over at us; and a sullen face it was too, his 
coarse, black eyebrows covering a third of bis forehead, and 
growing clear across the top of his nose ; then he turned 
suddenly to the sheriff and fired. The horse jumped as if he 



W btii priests took coii. 
Aud priueea l« fursw* 



The California!!. 



had been shot at before, aDd, wheeling about, threw his rider 
on the grouud, and the counterfeiter started on a run again. 

" ' So that's your game, is it ?' said the sheriff. ' I only 
want to kuow what your game is, so as to play according to 
rule;' — and, drawing his pistol, he snapped it at the fellow, 
but it missed fire. Throwing it down, he dashed after the 
man, and, coming up to him as he struggled through the tall 
tangled grass, near the slough, he seized him by his arms 
behind, and threw him down. We had started on a run too, 
and, coming up. we tied his arms with a handkerchief. 

" In the grass close by, Benway and I found two fifteen- 
thousand dollar packages of counterfeit bills, one of which we 
claimed as our share of prize money. In the fellow's saddle- 
pockets the sheriff found plates, engraving tools, and dies. 

"' You are a captain' I guess,' said the sheriff. ' Hold out 
your hands here, aud let me put on these bracelets. There you 
are now,' continued he, standing back to admire him, as if he 
had been a statue of the Greek Sfave — ' there you are now- 
all ready for court, with your regular uniform on, and the jury 
won't disagree a minute wheu they come to see your face, I 
think.' 

" ' Well, now, Benway,' said he, turning to us, ' what have 
you got to drink, and where are you going?' 

"Having satisfied the sheriff on the first point, Benway 
Baid, ' We are going out to attach Wells & Co.'s goods, and 
you must go with us.' 

" ' Their store is closed,' replied the sheriff ; ' I just came 
through there.' 

" ' Then we must break down the door,' said Benway. 

" ' But can you give bonds ?' he inquired. 

"' Yes, I represent the house of Phillips aud Lockshaw, 
good for a hundred thousand dollars, and I have one thousand 
here in my pocket, just to make things go easy.' 

"'AH right,' said the sheriff, briskly — 'down goes their 
door. Now one of you take our handsome friend into the 
buggy, while the other rides his nag.' So I mounted the 
horse ; the sheriff caught and mounted bis ; and falling into 
line, with the buggy ahead, we moved on again. 

" What we had most to fear now was that Wells & Co- 
would make an assignment, aud leave us to fight it out with a 
mob of claimants, and get little or nothing at last. So we hurried 
along ; but it soon came on dark, then darker, and finally 
black ; and we lost our way. 

" ' I believe we are going round and round,' said the sheriff. 

" ' No, I think we must be all right,' said Benway, ' for the 
mud has come on the left side of my face ever since dark.' 

" 'See here' my friend, you are a night bird,' said the sheriff 
to the counterfeiter. " Can't you do something handsome, 
and smell your way out of this scrape ?' 

" ' Yes,' said he, ' if you'll let me get on my horse, he and 
I can take you to the Fox Crossing on a bee-line.' 

" 'You are a very intellectual young man, considering your 
occupation,' said the sheriff, ' and your kind intentions do you 
honor ; but 1 guess we'll take the will for the deed, and find 
our own way out.' 

" ' What are you doing now ? ' inquired Benway of the 
sheriff, who was dismounted, and down in the grass. 

"'Spreading a newspaper,' he replied. ' I want to see if 
we shall come to it again, for I believe we are playing circus 
here ; ' — and about a hundred yards farther on he spread out 
the other half of the paper. 

" We went on again, through the endles3, everlasting grass, 
and in about an hour came to the paper, — the horses snorting 
and turning one side to avoid it ; aud then we came to the 
other piece. 

"' This won't do,' said the sheriff. ' We have beat down a 
road, and the horses have followed it round and round. Let 
us camp ;' — and, spreading his horse-blanket, we sat down on 
it near the buggy. 

" ' Not quite sp noisy as New York,' said he, after a long 
silence, ' but it's better. I've tried 'em both, and just for a 
place to live in, now, I wouldn't give this prairie for the whole 
island, from Spuyten Duyvil down.' 

" Then we sat there a long time, silently watching the sky ; 
and presently, where the clouds grew thin and vapory, the 
moon came slowly out, shining full in our (aces. 

"'Good morning, good morning!' said the sheriff, kissing 
his hand to her, as he rose to his feet. ' Now let's face about,' 
he contiuued, 'and keep the good old girl straight behind us, 
and we shall go all right.' 

" We had gone but a short distance when he said : ' I hear 
horses behind, and I guess they are counterfeiters, come to 
rescue the prisoner. If they are part of your gang,' said he to 
the counterfeiter, ' and attempt to rescue you, I give you fair 
notice that the father of your children may get hurt unless you 
keep quiet.' The man did not speak, but I heard the chain 
on his handcuffs rattle a little. 

" ' Who is that ? ' asked one of the horsemen, riding up be- 
hind. 

" ' Some travelers,' replied the sheriff. 

" ' You are out rather late. Have you met the sheriff? ' 
asked the horseman. 

'"Ah, ha! ' said that official, in a low voice, drawing his 
pUtol, and cocking it ; ' I've a devilish good mind to pepper 
the scoundrels. Are you loaded, Beuway ? ' 



" ' No, I haves no pistol,' he replied in a low tone. 
" ' I'm sorry, because we couldn't- very well hit amiss among 
them fellows,' said the sheriff, ' for they are a desperate gang. 
1 believe it would save the country several thousand dollars' 
expense of grand and petit jurors, and board in jail, if I could 
only make a centre shot, now.' 

" ' I say, have you seen the sheriff? ' said the horseman again, 
riding still nearer, but keeping within easy reach of his com- 
panions. 

"' See here ! ' said the sheriff, reining his horse suddenly 
around in the path before them. ' I'm the sheriff of this 
county, myself ; and I weigh a hundred and eighty pounds, 
when I'm light ! I've got one of your gang in irons — the 
Great Mugwump himself, I reckon — strongly guarded by men 
armed to the teeth ; so you just ride up here and surrender, or 
we'll blow you through, and kill old Mug too. Ride up here 
now, or we'll fire.' 

" Instead of obeying this sanguinary order, one of the party 
sang out. ' Ho-ho-hold on now, she-sheriff! don't shoo-shoot 
your friends ! ' 

" ' Bah ! ' said the sheriff, lowering his pistol and turning 
about disgusted, ' it's Old Royce. I wonder what's up now.' 
" ' Who is it ?' said I to Benway. 

" ' It is Roswell Lewis, a lawyer,' he replied. ' We call him 
Old Royce. He's out on that attachment suit against Wells 
& Co , and your friend Wakefield is with him, probably. Here' 
sheriff,' said Benway, ' ride back and give him this bottle : 
that will unlock his brains if anything can.' 

'"That's pretty good,' said Old Royce, 'and tastes like 
imported. My friend AVakefield here never takes anything ; 
so I guess I'll drink for him. I've always had to do double 
duty in the world. By the way,' he coutinued, ' I must tell 
you a good dodge that my friend here came on a pigwidgeon 
lawyer down in Chicago. This lawyer was trying to get ahead 
of my friend here, and had left orders to be called for the morn- 
ing train, but what does my friend here do but go and have 
the order changed — do you see ? — and so the little pigwidgeon 
is left behind. It's just such little touches of genius as that, 
sheriff, that redeems human nature, and makes us more than 
brutes. He'll make fifteen thousand dollars by it. Hallo, 
what's your hurry, sheriff? I can't keep up if you're going to 
trot, you know. This horse was made on purpose for a circus, 
I guess. He'd do all the square jumping up and down to 
music, but he ain't worth shucks to go ahead. He's a humpy 
horse, and I believe my brains would all be shaken into my 
boots if I r jde him another day ; ' — and he grumbled away in 
the same strain till we got out of hearing, and afterward, I 
presume. 

"•In two hours more we reached the Fox, and forded it, and 
found a sleepy ostler iu the hotel ; but on looking in the busrgy 
for my valise, I found it was gone, and it contained all my pa- 
pers. Wo had probably left it by the slough. Here was a 
bad fix ; for when it came daylight, Wakefield would attach, 
of course. 

" ' What shall we do, Benway ? ' said I. ' Can't you invent 
some plausible story to detain them?' 

" ' It looks to me,' he replied, ' as if we were to be defeated 
at last. I'll send some men to look for the valise, and we'll 
see what can be done after that ; but I know old Royce well, 
and when his head is clear again he'll be sharp enough — to use 
his own phrase — to shave hogs with a feather.' 

" I felt desperate now, for I had come to look on the matter 
as fairly under my control, and had already set Wakefield down 
as defeated ; but here the tables were to be turned with a ven- 
geauce, and my enemy was to triumph. 

" ' Benway,' said I, when he came back, ' I have got them, 
I guess. You say that Wells boards in this house and that 
you are intimate with him. Go to him with this fifteen thou- 
sand dollars iu counterfeit money, and tell him Old Royce 
is going to attach his goods. Then give him the money, with 
Instructions to be counting it over in his room, while you tell 
Royce that now is his time to attach, because Wells has sold 
out and is counting his money up stairs. Tell Wells that, if 
he plays his part properly, he will settle the Wolfe claim very 
Boon." 

" Benway hesitated a moment, then said, ' Well, under the 
circumstances I guess I will, for we are dealiug with unscrupu- 
lous fellows.' So when breakfast was over I saw Benway talk- 
ing with Wells, and soon after with Royce, who immediately 
went to the deputy- sheriff. 

" ' Now then,' said Royce to this official, after getting him 
out in the horse-shed, with Wakefield, ' what we want is grit. 
We must break down the door and grab all the money we see ; 
and mind you, if he puts it iu his pocket we must pull it out 
of hi? pociset, that's all. Businesss is business, and this is big 
business, and you must be gritty. There are moments of des- 
tiny,' said he, pulling a bottle from his pocket, and taking a 
long drink, ' aDd this is one of 'em.' 

" The whole party came back looking pale, aud the deputy 
started ahead, old Royce Lewis following next, and Wakefield 
closing up the rear on the stairway. Shortly alter they disap- 
peared we heard the door crushed in, and a scrambling rush 
followed. 



" We afterwards learned from the deputy, a jovial fellow, 
that Old Royce was the first man in the room, and that, after 
grebbing what money he could hold in each hand, he knocked 
the balance on to the floor and sat down on all he could cover, 
shouting to the deputy, ' I've got the pile ; attach me ! attach 
me I '—moving his elbows up and down, meanwhile, like a 
young crow trying in vain to fly. When they came down 
stairs, flushed with triumph, Mr. Lewis took occasion to re- 
count his twenty-five years' experience at the bar, which 
seemed to have been years of triumphs for him, and an unin- 
terrupted series of defeats for all his opponets. After this 
more convivality, more stories, more triumphs at the bar, but 
no one suspected the money. 

"Meantime the men returned with the valise just as Royce 
Lewis, Wakefield, and the deputy were leaving town with the 
money, and they had but fairly crossed the river when Wells 
invited us all up to his store to celebrate the success of the 
trick just played. 

" Wells was very jolly ; and that mysterious aud hitherto 
invisible being called ' Co.' came out 6trong. He even went 
so far as to say that he guessed ' Wells didn't eat no snow,' 
which meant, probably, that ha slaked his thirst and satisfied 
his appetite by the more economical and time-saviug methods 
usual among men. 

" ' Here, take some more all around,' urged Wells. ^'This 
last drive was the best I ever came on any one." 

" • Yes,' said Benway, walking up to the desk and looking 
at the papers, sharply , ' it was good — first rate — even for the, 
West, where we manage to keep ahead in business ; but I be- 
lieve the sheriff can show you a better one.' 

" ' I shouldn't wonder if I could ,' replied the sheriff, walk- 
ing up to Wells and serving the papers. 

"The man who ' didn't eat snow' looked so white for a 
moment that a stranger would have thought that snow was 
his regular food — in fact, that he ate nothing else. But the 
next moment be turned to Benway, fiercely, and said, ' You 
scoundrel, you got in here by fraud ; it's a swindle ; I won't 
stand it. I've a mind to knock you down, sir.' 

" ' No, don't now, Wells,' said Benway ; ' it is too expen- 
sive for you, under your present circumstances. We should 
have got in here any way, aud you merely saved a door by the 
operation ; that's all.' 

" ' Not all, exactly,' said Wells ; ' for I should have made 
an assignment and beaten you.' 

" ' Yes, I see it is all ready,' said Benway, taking up some 
papers from the desk ; ' but I'm pleased to notice that your 
very valuable autographs are not attached. Wells, you are a 
gentleman, and I'm sorry you've had bad luck ; but you'll 
corne out.' 

"After securing two trusty men to take charge of the store, 
we hunted, fished, smoked, and talked away the day, and rode 
back to the lake over the prairie next day. The first man we 
saw was old Royce Lewis. 

"' Where is your friend Wakefield ?' inquired Benway. 

"' The man who came that stunning game over the pigwid- 
geon lawyer,' said the sheriff. 

"'Why, he went off on the morning train, with orders to 
have the money deposited here in bank,' replied Royce. 

"' So he thinks it's all right, then.' 

" ' Of course.' replied Royce, contemptuously. 'And I 
made a good fee out of the case.' 

" ' Yes,' said the deputy, coming up, ' you were so very 
smart that you took your fee out of counterfeit money,' 

" This came so unexpectedly, and was received with such 
shouts of laughter, that the old man, for the first time in his 
life, perhaps, had nothing to say, and hurried off without at- 
tempting a reply. • 

" I finished my business, and took the next train East. I 
found Phillips and Lockshaw excited, as usual. They had 
learned from Mr. Wolfe that his claim had been collected in 
money, and they were much relieved, if not pleased, on hear- 
ing the true state of the case. 

"I met Wolfe on the street near my office. 

"'So I beat you, Riley, after all,' said he ; ' but allow me 
to say, sir, that I don't think you did the fair thing by me. 
You might have said at once that you were going out there for 
Phillips and Lockshaw.' 

" ' But, sir,' I replied, ' I had been retained by them in the 
case, and wa3 bound to protect them by concealing their de- 
signs.' 

"' I don't think so,' he replied ; ' besides, they could stand 
the loss, and I caD't.' 

'"Mr. Wolfe,' said I, 'I should as soon think of embez- 
zling my client's money, as I would of intentionally revealing 
any of the secrets confided to me as a lawyer.' 

" Next morning, when I met Wolfe, he not only refused to 
acknowledge my salutation, but was actually almost purple 
with rage. He had received a letter from Royce Lewis, stat- 
ing that the money was counterfeit. 

" I lost no time in calling on Fanny, but found her not at 
home. I excused that, thinking she might have been out ; but 
the next day I saw her in the street, and she avoided me. 

" I wrote her a brief, but vi gorous note, explaining my posi- 

[CO.NTINUED ON THE 10TH PAGE.] 



The Californian. 



NO TIC E. 

The publication of " The Californian - ' takes place on Saturday 
mornings, and copies may be obtained in the City at all News 
stands, and of our News-agents through the country. It will also 
be serr-i by carrier* on tlie morning of publication. 

White & Bauer, News Dealers, No. 410 Washington street, are 
General Agents for The Californian in tlie interior counties oj 
this State , also, for the adjacent Slates and Territories. 

A'l kinds of JOB PRINTING done with neatness and despatch 
at reasonable rates. 

J. P.BOGARDUS, 
J. F. BOWMAN. 



A ROMAN CATHOLIC THEORY OF TOLERATION. 



• V Editors and Proprietors 



THE CALIFORNIAN 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1867. 



MILITARY POLICE— STATE INTERFERENCE 
IN MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS. 



SOME of the democratic papers of New York, seem to 
contemplate the arming and drilling of the Metropolitan 
Police as a military body, with feelings of zealous alarm. 
" The police force of this city," says the Atlas, " once a purely 
popular organization, has been, by degrees, subjected to a 
more and more perfect military discipline until at last we are 
to have a Brigade of Police, armed and drilled as regular 
troops. This is a startling innovation and would have beeu 
strenuously opposed a few years ago as aping a monarchical 
institution unfitted for a republican country. The duties of 
the policeman and the citizen soldier have hitherto been kept 
scrupulously distinct, and the confounding of them now under 
the control of a Commission created by the State and in no 
wise responsible to the people of the city is not a movement in 
the direction of popular liberty." 

To a disinterested observer, familiar with the history of the 
city of New York for the last few years, and with its present 
political and social condition, it would seem as though the 
better class of its population had more emtuinent perils to 
dread than any that are likely to arise from the increased ef- 
ficiency and power of the police force. As to the interposi- 
tion of the State Legislature by the creation of a Police 
Commission, beyond the control of a mere municipal majority, 
we are by no means certain that interference of a similar 
kind, but exteuding to more matters than those affecting 
police organizations, will not ultimately become a necessity in 
all the large cities of the United States. Thus far, experience 
seems to iudicate that under our system of government it is 
the fate of the great centers of commerce and population 
gradually to fall under the control of the worst class of cor- 
rupt politicians, who, by their influence with a comparatively 
ignorant majority, bold the rights of the minority at their 
mercy. If San Francisco thus far furnishes an exception, 
the fact may, perhaps, find an explanation in exceptional cir- 
cumstances in her history. " The Police Board," says the 
Alias, " is gradually absorbing all power, and it promises in a 
few years to exercise unlimited military authority. If this is 
republicanism it is of a new (angled kind which can scarcely 
be distinguished by old fashioned eyss, from that which our 
fathers called despotism." 

It is not, we are sure, the respectable and industrious por- 
tion of the population of aty American city that are troubled 
by apprehensions of a '• police despotism." There is a des 
potism, however, of quite a different description which they 
have good reason to dread— the despotism of an ignorant or 
depraved majority under the control of petty demagogues who 
make municipal politics a trade, and municipal office the means 
of obtaining a living by corrupt bargaining, contract sellin. 
and place brokering. In a city where such scenes as those of 
the anti negro, and the outrages that attended the last cele- 
bration at " St. Patrick's Day," in New York, are liable to 
occur, it 6eems to us that the police force cannot well be too 
powerful or too thoroughly organized. 



BOOKS RECEIVED. 

r 7^HE following new publications have been received at 
_L this office : 

Sut Lovingood. Yarns Spun By a Nat'ral Born Durn'd 
Fool, Warped and Wove for Public Wear, By Georne Hani.-. 
New York ; Dick & Fitzgerald Publishers, San Francisco ; 
A. Roman & Co., pp. 229 with illustrations, 

Where Shali, He Find Hek? From the French, Trans- 
lated by I. D. A. New York; Crowen & Co., I8G7. Being 
No. 1. of *he •' Library of Light Literature," Paper covers 
pp 257, San Francisco; A. Roman & Co 

Lectures on Natural Theology : or Nature and the Bible 
from the same author. Delivered before the Lowell Institute, 
Boston. By P. A. Cnndbourne A. ML M. D.. Professor of 
Natural History in Williams College ; Author of Lectures on 
the" Relations of Natural History," etc New York : G. P. 
Putnam & Son, C61, Broadway, 1867. San Francisco ; A. 
Roman & Co. 

The Forlorn Hope. By Edmuud Yates. Author of the 
"Black Sheep," "Land at Last," etc. Lonng, Publisher: 
Boston. A. Roman & Co., San Francisco. 

The Episcopate, the Missokary Order of the Church. 



THE Monitor, a weekly paper published in this city, which 
claims to be " the only Irish or Catholic journal on this 
coast," has undertaken to justify the recent action of the Peru- 
vian government in refusing to permit the public exercise of 
any worship except that of the Roman Catholic Church within 
its jurisdiction. The reasoning of the Monitor, if not remark- 
able for logical force, is worthy of the serious consideration of 
all American citizens who value freedom of opinion and belief, 
upon grounds quite distinct from its intrinsic merits. 

"An entirely Catholic community," so the argument com- 
mences, " in which the people believe every tittle of their 
common faith to have been revealed by God, must consider 
apostacy from the Church as an act opposed to morality, and 
may, therefore, logically prohibit such being done publicly, or 
any attempt to bring it about, as the erection of temples for 
other worship is. If a mau's conscientious opinions lead him 
into acts contrary to public decency as es'.ablisbed in the com- 
munity of which he is a member, such acts are and must be 
restrained by law, as polygamy is prohibited in the United 
States, though its lawfulness is conscientiously held by Mor- 
mons and Mahometans. On the same principle Catholic States 
may prohibit the open introduction of new doctrines. Calho" 
licity being established on the principle that all men are bound 
to believe what the Church teaches, considers wilful disbelief 
as sinful, and accordingly its public toleration is entirely a 
question of expediency. Protestantism, established on the 
principle that every man has a right to form his own creed, 
must, in consistency, allow each to worship in his own man- 
ner. Thus the case Is widely different in a Catholic country 
and a Protestant one. For instance, in the United States, 
where there is no commonly received religion, Unitarians and 
Episcopalians, CalvinisU and Armenians, Baptists, and Metho- 
dists, are as opposite as tlie poles, aod mutual toleration is a 
matter of necessity ; but in Peru, where the entire population 
is Catholic, it is no hardship or tyranny for them to remain 
so by their own will." 

The wide difference thus coolly declared to exist, in regard 
to religious toleration, between " a Catholic Country and a 
Protestant one," amounts according to the Monitor, to pre- 
cisely this, that in the Catholic Country, religious freedom 
caunot consistently be allowed to Protestants, while in the 
Protestant Country it must be granted to Catholics, This 
theory may be a very satisfactory one to Roman Catholics ; 
but we doubt much whether American Protestants are, 
as yet, fully prepared to accept it with the meekness that 
seems to be expected of them. Unless it is considered that 
unusual concessions are due to extraordinary arrogance, and 
that a title to exceptional privileges may be established t>y 
exceptional pretensions, Americans will be slow in yielding 
assent to the proposition that Romanists have a right to 
suppress Protestant worship wherever they have the power to 
do so and may deem the exercise of that power expedient 
For tlie claim of " the only Irish or Catholic journal " is noth 
ing less than this. " A Catholic legislator," it declares, in the 
same article from which we have quoted above, " in a purely 
political point of view, must view them " (religious innova- 
tions) •• with distrust, and, if possible, endeavor to prevent 
their introduction ; thous."!) if they once become established, 
it is Usually more expedient to tolerate them." And in ihe 
next sentence we an- gravely assured that " though toleration 
is thus only a question of expediency in Catholic Countries, 
and as asri-iust Protestantism," it is to be regarded as" a 
right in Protestant ones " 

However consistent this theory may be with the traditiona' 
pretensions of the Church of Rune, it is clear that it is at wtir 
with the principle of religious freedom, and that it threatens 
the rights of minorities wherever Koman Catholics are in the 
m jority. The saving clause to the effect that thoujjh it is the 
duty of the Catholic legislator to prevent the introduction of 
doctrines not approved by the Church, yet if once established. 
' it is usually more expedient to tolerate them," furnishes a 
feeb'e security indeed, to persons holding such doctrines. 
Cue question ol expediency is one that admits of being viewed 
i:i many lights, and is greatly affected by the question of op- 
portunity and power. Let the principle be conceded that Iree- 
dom of worship cannot be claimed as a right in countries where 
the powers of government are wielded by Roman Catholics, 
that toleration under such circumstances is a mere question of 
expediency, and there is too much reason to conclude that the 
suppression of religious freedom would be found to be expe 
dieut wherever it is practicable. 



A POETICAL PUZZLE. 

IN nearly all of Mr. Swinburne's earlier poems, there was a 
large element of that kind of obscurity, that affects even 
the critic who has beeu accustomed to cherish the complacent 
belief that there can be no intelligible meaning where he finds 
himself puzzled to discover any, with ar. uneasy doubt as to 
whether the difficulty lies in the author's depth, or in his own 
do] ness. Yet Mr. Swinburne's obscurity is of quite another 
kind than Browning's. There is no metaphysical element in 
it. It is passionate rather than philosophical, and seems to 
spring in part, at least, from the audacious struggle of an im- 
agination at once subtle aud fervid, to flash meanings upon the 
mind that are incapable of distinct expression in words, or to 
produce impressions by the use of unintelligible language, (un- 
intelligible in the sense that no meaning can be reached by the 
process of verbal analysis) that could not be produced by the 
use of intelligible language. . 

There is a poetic obscurity that springs from weakness, of 
which it would be easy to point out any desired number of ex- 
amples in contemporary writers ; but there is also an obscurity 
that has its origin in the highest iutellectual and imaginative 
force, coupled with a spirit that delights in grappling with 
difficulties from which feebler natures shrink. 

To the class of critics who cannot tolerate the nsein poeti- 
cal composition, of any phrase, or form of expression, or col- 
location of words that does not convey a distinct meaning and 
admit of rigid grammatical and rhetorical analysis, both 
Browning and Swinburne are of course, an abomination. 
Critics of this creed were sufficiently disgusted with •' Chas- 
tellard," and "The Queen Mother," but the " Song of Italy," 
the poet's latest production, will prove still more exasperat- 
ing, so far as we can judge from such portions of it as we 
have read. 

There are, however, some exceedingly vigorous objurgatory 
passages in the poem, which are intelligible enough, particu- 
larly that in which the Pope is pictured as gloating over pros- 
trate Italy. Other portions of the song, even after a second 
and third reading leave us as much mystified as ever, and yet 
not without a certain vague apprehension of a meaning such 
as may be felt in a strain of uiusic, but cannot be translated 
into words. 

A few extracts from the poem, upon which the reader can, 
if so inclined, exercise his iugeuuity, will be found in the " Lit- 
erary Gieanings " on another page of our present issue. 



By A. Presbyter, New York. Pott & Amery, Booksellers^ 
Publishers aDd Importers, 5 & 13 Cooper Unioo, 1867. 



The Santa Clara iVe-uw is the name of a new paper re- 
cently established nt the town of Santa Clara, Santa Clara 
county. It is a large sheet, handsomely made up, attractive 
in its typographical appearance, and is edited with judgment 
and ability. In politics it is Republican. Ihe name of John 
M. Sullivan, well known in this State as an experienced jour- 
nalist, appears at the head of its columns, as editor. 

A " Stkinwav " Victorious. — A telagram was received in 
this city from Paris during the present week announcing that 
the first premium of the World's Fair, a gold medal, was 
awarded to a Steinway piano. Checkering received the second 
premium 



The Pacific Churchman and the Monitor have bad a brief 
controversial passage in reference to the recent charge of 
Bishop Kip, in which the latter paper assumed a highly offen- 
sive tone, and one singularly out of place, we should think, 
in a religous journal. Indeed, both the language and the 
spirit of the Monitor in speaking of ihe Churchman and the 
Episcopal Bishop of this diocese, were grossly discourteous, 
and not distinguishable from thoee of the less respectable 
class of partisau journals in their assaults upon political op- 
ponents. Our Human Catholic fellow citizens are exceedingly 
sensitive in regard to any disrespectful allusion to their 
Church or its diguitaries, and their indignation would have 
been most vehement had any journal in this city ventured to 
speak of Arch-bishop Allemany in the strain of coarse levity 
employed by the Monitor toward Bishop Kip. Those who 
are so prompt in resenting offences of this description, oucht, 
one would think, to be guarded in their own conduct. It will 
scarcely do For persons who are utterly careless of showing 
courtesy to opponents, to be punciiiiuus in exacting it lor 
themselves. 

The entertainment to be given under the auspices of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, and for their benefit at 
I Mall's 1 1 all next week, promises to be ol an unusually ut tractive 
character, besides beiug a decided novelty. The Association 
is to be congratulated on their judicious selection of a lady 
President lor ihe occasion, whose skill and- experience io such 
matters furnish a guaranty that all the arrang< inents will be 
conceived in good taste, and carried out with rare executive 
tact. 'Ihe ubole desigu, so far as the dt tails have been made 
known, seems to be quite an original one, eutircly out of the 
beaten track ol Fairs and Festivals, which have been so fre- 
quent of late as to have become an intolerable bore. Among 
the novel features of the present entertainment, will be a "Cor- 
ner Grocery," aud an old lashioned " Yankee Tavern" both of 
which will be '• character institutions " in every practicable 

detail. 

The Rev. Mr. Savage, of Grass Valley, has charged 
Mrs. Laura Cuppy with having "in one breath asserted that 
Jesus Christ was the best and divinest man that overlived, 
and in the next, that his whole mission was a humbug and an 
imposture, and himself a cheat, a hypocrite, and a liar." We 
ure assured that Mrs. Cuppy never used this language, or any 
of similar import, and we fully credit the denial Mrs. Cuppy 
is a lady of education and refinement, and has no affinities with 
the scurrilous and blaspheming class of table-tippers. She 
denies the divinity of Jesus, but the language in which she 
preseuts her views of his character and mission, is scarcely 
distinguishable Irom that of Unitarians of the School of Theo- 
dore Parker, and it has always been characterized so far as 
we are informed, by a spirit of reverence and by perfect de- 
corum of expression. 



The Californian. 



9 



| For tlie Californian.] 
DIGNITY, NO. TWO. 

BY PRENTICE. 

DIGNITY appertains to some editors. I approach this 
phase of dignity with trepidation. I am bringing down 
jugs of wrath upon my head, yet it must be said ; some edi- 
tors are dignified. Wby is this? Why does a remorseless, 
impelling, unavoidable destiny compel me to write these things ? 
Wby am I the victim selected to give expression to certain 
ideas relative to editorial dignity. I see wo in the future. 
Yet I must write. It is inevitable. I am doomed. 

The desire to publish and edit a paper is common to all 
humanity. Yet have we not all a right to aspire ? Certainly- 
Is mental diminutiveness any bar to aspiration ? Certaiuly 
not. The frog had a right to try and Bwell himself to the 
dimension? of the ox. He had also the right to burst. He 
did burst. The ox was not harmed. These editors have a 
right to be dignified. It requires an endless amount of skill, 
genius and execative power to edit a newspaper. Money is 
necessary ; but money is not all. Brains are somewhat useful ; 
but brains are not all. These things are well in their place. 
But in order to fuse the two into the proper combination, the 
Great Being, the Figure Head, the Divine Afflatus must be 
present to sit in the editorial chair, to represent the awful 
" We," to disburse the cash needful to keep going the 
machine, cursed with the brains, to entertain visitors, to chat 
with simple folks and literary people from afar, who retire 
wondering if that indeed be the God, to say unto Scrub, "Scrub 
thou art commanded, thou art ridden, the bit is in thy mouth, 
the saddle on thy back, Scrub there is barley in the maDger 
for the pack-horse who works well in harness, and none for 
the balky nag, Scrub thou art commanded, Scrub write what 
things I tell unto the, pull down, build up, praise, blame, tra- 
duce, slander, villify, blacken, and tear from thy breast the 
remnant of that useless rag, conscience." 

Yet if the gnat ride the elephant, shall not the gnat be dig- 
nified ? You are angry my friend at the gnat for its assump- 
tion. Why do you look at it ? How weak in you thus to be 
troubled by an insignificant insect though it be a mental blood- 
sucker. How foolish to be angry at such a grand comedy! 
Country editors are sometimes dignified. It is natural. Look 
at the Weekly Squab. It is owned and conducted by a man 
like the rest of us. He had a father and a mother. He was 
brought up in a civilized land. He was sent to a school. He 
learned to read, to write, to cipher up to the " Rule of Three." 
He has buzzed through grammar. He was once proficient in 
Geographical boundaries. He has trodden carefully on the 
outskirts of history. He once came near thinking for himself, 
but while treading upon the verge of an idea he was attacked 
by Political Partisanship. The malady took deep root. He 
is Democratic. He is Republican. It matters not. The seed 
is the same. So is the blossom. He treads three great ave- 
nues of thought, and three only, devotion to party, opposition 
to political opponents, and hostility to the few who think for 
themselves. The mountain of misty importance, weekly gives 
birth to the sickly ghost of a mouse. It is the Squab. There 
are five columns of quack advertisements terrible fur youthful 
contemplation. There are the cards of the lawyer, the physi- 
cian, the dentist. There are the advertisements of the butcher 
the baker, the retailer of dry goods and groceries, and the 
candlestick makers, setting forth their wares, being the literary 
pabulum of the Squab most inviting to the palate of the 
readers. * 

But the original matter. Has not this man brains ? Yes 
certainly, thin, frothy, translucent, but nevertheless brains. 
There they are -rubbed over a column and a half of the inside, 
mixed with the refuse of old ideas, stirred to a paste, with just 
enough consistency to stick together. I hear a voice ever re- 
peating the same drowsy speech. " Stay in this house. Men 
built it who could think. We cannot think." And meanwhile 
the flood is roaring and rising, the timbers creak and groan, 
the house rocks, even the rats are leaving it and traveling up 
the mountain side. In the midst of all this commotion, out 
steps the editor of the Squab, complacent and dignified. He 
deems himself one of the engineers of the flood. He imagines 
he has over it some control with his puny press. The gods 
laugh. But the editor of the Squab hears them not. All the 
villagers know him. He is the editor. He receives free 
tickets to balls, the circus, the menagarie, the comical exhibi- 
tions of negro minstrels, the panorama, and the learned pig. 
He is one of the great men at races and Fourth of July cele- 
brations. It is a mark of honor to be able to " treat " him. 
No wouder he is dignified. 

Dignity is a conspicuous appendage to schoolmasters. It 
cannot be wondered at.. Their profession obliges them to cul- 
tivate d'gnity. 

Youth is boisterous. R, must be overawed. But you may 
say, " Spare this useful, inoffensive class of men. They traiu 
the youthful mind. Their employment should be regarded with 
respect." True. I am aware of this. Unhappy being that I 
ara to be compelled to speak thus of the schoolteacher, because 
I once witnessed the antics of one solitary pedant ! If he 



looked with contempt upon other men because of their ina- 
bility to pounce like a hawk upon a required rule of grammar 
or the rule for the proper pronunciation of words of four sylla- 
bles ending in tion, or give the proper definition of a letter, or 
tell with exasperating correctness which is tho Northernmost 
cape in Europe, the longest river and the highest mountain in 
the world, is that any reason why I should regard his brethren 
as possessed with similar peculiarities ? I am astonished at 
such inconsistency. This man thought nothing could be taught 
outside of the schoolhouse. 

What to him was the forest? A place for runaway boys to 
go birdnesting. And the brooks and rivers? Places where 
case hardened urchins fished, bathed, and occasianally got 
drowned. Nature to him was only legitimate when bound in 
calf. Wisdom and learning could only be found between book 
covers. The end and aim of education was more successfully 
to "get on " in life. Naughty, idle boys died poor. Tho in- 
dustrious, studious and good left for the kingdom of Heaven 
rich, or at least in good circumstances. Yet, how narrow and 
contracted that mind must be to assume from this that all, or 
a majority of pedagogues think similarly. 

Virtue in this man, lay in grammatical correctness. Vice 
lay in the improper use of adverbs. Total depravity in substi- 
tuting the objective for the nominative case. 

I did not wish my boy crammed with moral philosophy at 
the age of eight years. To him I ventured to say this. I 
knew not the peril of such a course. 1 trod upon his inflamed 
dignity. He knew what he was about. Was he not an edu- 
cator by trade ? Had he not taken the dimensions, the depth, 
the breadth and the capacity of my boy's brain with his square 
and compass ? 

He contended that no man could become a good citizen 
and discharge his duties to himself and to society without a 
thorough knowledge of algebra. Was not Napoleon a mathe- 
matical genius ? said he. But I did not want my boy a 
Napoleon. He looked at me with amazement and contempt, 
and adjusting his immense burthen of dignity on his back as 
a pedlar does his pack, strode heavily and majestically 
away. 

There is first class journalistic dignity. There are people 
who, when walking on stilts, imagine they are above their fel- 
lows. Well, are they not ? Yes, but the legs are of wood and' 
there may be an assimilating quality of the head. At all events, 
when these apparent intellectual giants looked up to by Tom, 
Dick aud Harry, with so much awe and reverence, are tripped 
up by a four line squib, they do seem very ridiculous, especially 
when they attempt to rise with the stilts still strapped to 
them. 

The Price of Paintings in San Francisco. — The artists' 
sale of oil paintings by Duncan & Co., on Friday evening, 
was largely attended and the entire catalogue sold. The list 
embraced all of Marple's best pictures aud those of Arriola & 
Denny. Ffty-two paintings were disposed of, the principle 
ones at the following prices : " Pilot-boat Cruising," by 
Denny, $22'.< ; " North Dome," by Marple, $59 ; Landscape, 
by Marple, $35 ; " Two Domes," by Marple, $421., ; " View 
in Spring Valley," by Marple, $31 ; " Pilot-boat Caleb Cur- 
tis Cruising," by Denny, $36; "Job's Peak," by Marple, $56 ; 
" Volcano," by Arriola, $50 ; " Sly Park," by Marple, $72>£ ; 
" Farollones," by Denny, $22% ; " Kenilworth Castle," by 
Arriola, $80; " Yosemite Falls," by Marple, $105; "Napa 
Creek," by Marple, $65 ; " Helmet Rock," by Arriola, $150 ; 
" Coast near Monterey," by Denny. $25; "Russian River 
Valley," by Marple, 2 views at $50 and $55 ; " Mazatlan," by 
Arriola, $150 ; " North side of Yosemite," by Marple, $57>£ ; 
" Ruins in Italy," by Arriola, $90 ; " Starr King Yosemite." 
by Marple, $75; "Fallen Leaf- Lake," by Marple, $40; 
" Scene on the Stanislaus," by Denny, $50 ; 2 heads, " Hits 
at the Fashions," by Arriola. $25 and $26 : " El Capitano," by 
Marple, $32 1 2 . The sale footed up over $2,000. 

The Commencement Exercises of the Latin High School 
will take place this evening, at a quarter before eight o'clock, 
at Lincoln Hall, corner of Market and fifth streets. Mr. 
George Easton, who has carried off the " first honor " of his 
class, will deliver the Valedictory, with an oration on " The 
Late Struggle." Mr. Melville H. Regensburger, who took the 
'second honor," pronounces the Latin Salutatory; aud ora- 
tions on " Treason," Ambition," " Julius Caesar," " American 
Aristocracy," " Physical Education," and " Classical Studies," 
will be delivered by Messrs. Frank E. AVhite, Joseph Mee, 
Charles B. Learned, Sidney Worth, George E. Davis, and 
Edward Blaney, respectively. The Roll of Honor for the 
term ending May 6th, 1867, embraces the names of James 
Lankersbim, Jacob Rieustien, Edward Blaney, John L. Scud- 
der, and M. M. Caldwell, in the first grade, and Harrison A. 
Jones and Joseph C. Rowell, in the second grade. 

Miss Pittsingers Reading. — Miss Pittsinger gave a read- 
ing of original and selected articles at the Mechanics' Insti- 
tute Hall last Wednesday evening. The lady poetess claims 
our sympathy. She has several times before in this capacity, 
ventured to entertain the public. It is evident she lacks the 
assistance and advice of a true friend. Miss Pittsinger's style- 
is rich, striking, and full ot originality. A little of it goes a 
grdat way. She may yet succeed in this vocation, and show 
another example of the wom'e-s which may be accomplished 
by patience, boldness and perseverance. 



ITALIAN OPERA. 

SINCE our last review three new operas have been pro- 
duced— La Favorita on Friday and Saturday, / Marliri 
on Monday, and 11 Barbiere di Siviglia on Wednesday. In 
La Favorita, Mme. Stella Bonheur made a very favorable im- 
pression as " Leonora," dressing the character magnificently, 
acting with great force, and singing the music in a style to 
which we can offer no objection except in regard to the trem- 
ulousness already noticed. She was frequently applauded ; 
and the duet with Signor Mancusi ('■ Alphonso ") in the sec- 
ond act was encored on Friday evening, while that in the last 
scene with Signor Limberti (" Fernando ") excited equal en- 
thusiasm on Saturday. The general effect of the performance 
was not sufficiently good on either night to merit further 
notice. I Marliri was tolerably well rendered, and the duet 
between Signorina Brambilla (" Paolina ') and Signor Limberti 
(" Poliuto ") in the last act was given with such intensity of 
voice and action as to receive a unanimous encore. 

The representation of 11 Barbiere was a brilliant success, 
the cast comprising nearly the whole strength of the company. 
Signorina Brambilla displayed wonderful execution in the 
florid music assigned to " Rosina," and in the lesson scene 
she introduced two favorite concert waltzes, which were im- 
mensely applauded. Signor Bianchi as "Almaviva," Signor 
Mancusi as " Figaro," M. Roncovieri as " Dr. Bartolo," and 
(last but by no means least) Signor Milleri as " Don Bas- 
llio," were all unusually excellent ; the orchestra and chorus 
were good, and the whole performance a thoroughly enjoyable 
one. 

II Trovaiore was played last night for the third time, con- 
stituting the final regular performance of a season in which we 
find much to praise, though we have felt obliged to be severe 
sometimes in our criticism of details. Un Ballo in Maschera 
will be given this evening as an extra performance. The sec- 
ond seasou is postponed until week after next ; meantime 
L' Africaine and other new operas will be carefully rehearsed , 
and we may expect a high degree of completeness when they 
are finally brought before the impatient public. 

" Mark Twain's " Book. — Our popular California humor- 
ist, whose sketches in The Californian first won an East- 
ern recognition of his genius, has collected a number of his 
best pieces in this elegant volume of some one hundred and 
ninety odd pages. The book embraces, besides the " Jumping 
Frog," the " Launching of the Steamer Capital," better 
known, perhaps, as the " History of the Traveling Pano- 
rama," the " Story of The Little Bad Boy Who Didu't 
Come to Grief," " Among the Spirits," " Literature In the 
Dry Diggings," "The Killing of Julius Caesar Localized," 
and twenty other pieces in the same vein. The author is too 
well known to the Californian public to require the introduc- 
tion, of "John Paul," who somewhat unnecessarily appears 
in a prefatory "advertisement" as editor of the volume. 
One of the most characteristic features of " Mark Twain's " 
humor is the basis of shrewd observation, hard good sense, 
and keen, yet by no means cynical, perception of the foibles 
of character, that underlies it, giving it a certain value and 
significance quite independent of its power to excite the risi- 
bilities. 

The greater portion of the sketches that compose the pres- 
ent, volume appeared originally iu The Californian, but tb^y 
are not of the ephemeral quality that cannot endure the test 
of a second reading. The dedication of the book is eminently 
characteristic, and since it is as brief as it is original in con- 
ception and style, we will give it entire. Here it is : "To 
John Smith, whom I have known in Divers and Sundry Places 
about tha World, and whose many and Manifold Virtues did 
ever Command my Esteem, I Dedicate this Book. Jt is said 
that the man to whom a volume is dedicated, always buys a 
copy. If this prove true in the present instance, a princely 
affluence is about to burst upon — The Author." 

The book may be obtained at H. H. Bancroft & Co's. 

Last Evening's Bulletin, in an article entitled " The. Oppo- 
sition to the People's Movement," evinces some little of that 
" campaign spirit " which reminds us unpleasantly of tha tem- 
per that characterized in " early days." During the last few 
years there has been a noticeable advance in the tone and 
character of San Francisco journalism. But it is a significant 
fact that on the eve of every municipal election, a marked 
retrogade tendency is developed. The passious and preju- 
dices stimulated into activity by political contests, seem to be 
too strong for the restraints imposed by the laws of journalis- 
tic decorum, and in the article alluded to, the Bulletin breaks 
out in the coarse strain which belongs rather to its old tradi- 
tions than the better reputation which it has earned. " Who 
i3 George C. Gorham," it asks, " that the people of San Fran- 
cisco should take him for a Dictator ? What has tne cunning 
little wire-worker from Yuba done to entitle him to the Buffer- 
ages of this great city ?" etc. Tbis is not exactly the style of 
political "discussion" which the better class of its readers 
have of late years been accustomed to look for in the Bulletin' 



10 



The Californian. 



escape, as soou almost a3 the intention was formed, and then 
he threw himself forwards rapidly in a sort of low trot, bis 
body nearly on the ground, and his nose very close to it. 
Thus he darted on with more swiftness than could be expected 
from his creeping position, taking very short but astonishingly 
quick step3, in an oblique direction, so as to head the bull at 
the nearest possible point, which he unerringly did, and when 
he met him he made no noise, and used no force or violence of 
any kind. It seemed to be quite sufficient that their eyes 
should meet, for the bull to be rendered helpless and impotent, 
so far as resistance went — that he felt he must turn to avoid 
the terrible gaze of the tyrant bent upon his distruction, and 
that he must pursue the course which was indicated to him, in 
order to avoid that gaze which he could not bear to encounter. 

Once and only once during that long and, to him, most pain- 
ful drive, did the poor animal make what might be called a de- 
termined effort to resist the tyrannical oppressor. He had 
been ascending an inclined plane of about a mile in length, and 
at the top of it there was a sheet of water — one of those 
inland lakes so frequently found in South Africa, in which 
are almost as often found the alligator, and, where trees 
are abundant on the margins of the water, the rhinoceros. It 
is remarkable that cattle have a sort of instinctive dread of 
these waters— probably from their being the haunts of the for- 
mer voracious reptiles — and they will endure great thirst rather 
than approach them. They seem to have been taught by ex- 
perience — the most expressive of all teachers — that, although 
the eye may fail to detect the presence of the lurking mon. 
sters, they may be crouched under any bank, and if their hiding 
place be at one extremity of the lake and the prey at the 
other, they will run under the water and suddenly seize and 
drag down a victim before their presence is discovered. On 
ordinary occasions, no doubt, the bull would have shunned the 
water before him, but now he, perhaps, felt that no worse 
enemy could be in it than was behind him. At all events, 
when the lion bore away to the right to make the ani- 
mal turn to the left, which was the direct course toward his 
own den, the bull plunged into the lake with a force that 
dashed the water into a foam, and proceeded directly across it. 
I expected the lion would follow ; but his tactics were differ- 
ent. 

To my surprise, he did not seem mnch put out of his way 
by the effort of his captive to escape. I was rejoicing, for I 
fancied the bull would get off. By " Jove," said I, " he will 
get away, and I am glad of it." 

" He will, by-and-by," said Glenlyon, " but not now. That 
lion is too well up to his work. See how he bounds round 
the lake ; by the time'the bull is across he will head him, and 
his eyeB will draw him out of the water as they drew him out 
of the herd." 

And it was so. The crafty brute went round the bank by a 
series of bounds till be was opposite the punting creature, 
when the latter halted and turned to another point, where he 
hoped to land. In vain — the lion headed him there. After 
many efforts of a similar nature, all equally unavailing, their 
eyes must have met, for the bull became suddenly motionless 
— and then we beard the heavy stroke of the lion's paw upon 
the earth. It was repeated twice, and the poor bull unresist, 
ingly walked ashore, the lion drawing back to induce him to 
land, and then going on one side, as he had done on the former 
occasion. Theu he got in the rear of his prey aDd drove him 
onward as quietly as before. 

I cou!J have rushed forward round the head of the lake and 
shot the brute, at all hazards to myself, so much were my sym- 
pathies with the helpless victim ; and I should, had not Glen- 
lyon placed his hand on my arm, saying : 

" Do not be premature. The journey is drawing to a close. 
If the lion were killed here, we might have more difficulty 
with the lioness ; we might not be able to draw her out, aud 
we have uo torches to go in to her ; besides, there are but two 
things which can be well done in haste, and lion-killing is not 
one of them. When you catch fleas or run away from the 
cholera, you must use haste ; but a hasty aim at a lion so 
crafty as that fellow is, would eud far worse for you than bim. 
So be quiet, and take things coolly. When he gets his prey 
to his own door, and his wife comes out to see what he has 
brought home, I shall perceive the right moment to begin, and 
you may be sure I will not neglect it. If I miss, then you 
may do your very best to correct my error; but remember 
once for all, a lion at close quarters is a dangerous beast to 
encounter, and no man is fit to meet him whose pulse rises 
half a beat above the ordinary number. Count your pulse, 
and tell me how fast it is going now." 

I felt the indirect reproof. My heart was bumping audibly. 
With the best grace I could, I replied : " You are quite right, 
Glenlyon ; I am not so cool as a man should be with an ene- 
my like that. I shall never make a hunter.' 1 

After the attempt I have described, the poor bull made no 
other : he seemed to resign himself to his fate, whatever and 
however dreadful that might be, and, in truth, to his instincts 
it must have been a fearful one. 

About three quarters of an hour from the time we left the 
lake the high rocks loomed darkly in our sight. No longer 
resisting, but hopeless and desponding, the bull hung his head 



droopingly, and moved on listlessly, he cared not whither, 
in whatever direction his grim follower intimated. Arrived 
at the foot of the boulders, the lion gave a roar that almost 
shook the rocks themselves, and the hapless victim sank for- 
ward on his knees, from which he with difficulty arose, and 
stood quivering with terror. He had scarcely risen when the 
lioness rushed out to the opening at the head of the boulders, 
in haste to view the spoil to be laid at her feet. The sight of 
another enemy in front of him caused the bull to shrink back- 
wards, but a roar from the foe behind him caused him to 
stand, or rather to totter, while the vapor rose from his body 
profusely, and he uttered moans so despairing, so acutely ex- 
pressive of his agonies, that I could scarcely bear to hear 
them, I felt my eyes growing moist, I own, when I found the 
hand of Glenlyon upon my left shoulder, and heard him 
whisper : 

" Look to your caps ; tell Ilitchj to do the same. You and 
he are too excited to aim truly, but I may want your roer and 
his rifle. Have both your knives out ready, if I should breuk 
my own. I shall abridge the tortures of that poor beast. The 
moment I get the two lions' heads in line, I fire. All I ask 
you to do is to hand me your roer then, and to load mine ; 
plenty of powder and one bolt, as you saw me put in mine — a 
charge and half of powder. Now, God bless you ! Here 
goes ?" 

He left me and walked up behind the lion till he could see 
the glare of the lioness' eyes between his ear-tips, when he 
knelt. She bad not yet left the spot where she first stopped 
to look on the prey. Up went the roer slowly — bang ! I 
could hear no crash ; if there were any, it too closely followed 
the heavy report of the roer to be distinguished ; but I knelt 
down to look beneath the smoke : the liou was on his knees, 
quivering. 

The Kaffir had picked up part of a phrase in common use 
among our men : "His goose is cooked," and he now 6aid to 
me, " Cooce cook — moosch big proaphet — iz — cook gooce 
moosch well." 

As he spoke, another " bang " was heard, and I saw the 
lioness leap and fall down among the boulders, where she 
rolled and struggled violently — now up, theu down — on her 
'side, fightingatJ.be huge stones which she sent rolling against 
others— on her back, all her feet fighting with the air, and 
sending forth frightful yells that drew many eagles out of the 
rocks — in the hope of a banquet, probably— and their 6creams, 
joined to her unearthly shrieks, and the shrill cries of the val- 
tares, made a deafening confusion of sounds in which our 
voices could not be heard. 

I sprang forward to hand my roer to Glenlyon, who took it 
quite -coolly, and drawing his tomahaac, went on to the lion, 
merely saying, " His appetite is spoiled, and his lady is very 
ill, I think." Using my night-glass, I could see the lion laid 
still till Glenlyon got up to him, wheu he moved, but as rapid 
as the lightning, the tomahaac swung round and was buried in 
his brains. Then he went on to the bull, and considerately 
turned his head round toward me. The animal caught sight 
of his dead foe, and seemed to comprehend that he was power- 
less to harm him, for he walked, or, more properly, reeled past 
him, and came on toward me, from whom, but a few hours be- 
fore, he would have fled ; and when at my side, he stood, pant- 
ing, and with heaviug flanks, between ine aud llitcbj. each 
stroke of his heart beiug loudly heard, aud large tears rolling 
down his face. 

Anxious for Glenlyon, I hastily patted our new friend, as he 
stood trembling, and turned to go to see what the lioness was 
about. I might have spared myself the anxiety. Glenlyon 
had settled ber earthly accounts for her, and was coolly walk- 
ing back to me, and wiping his banting-knife with some grass 
he had torn up. His first words when he came up were : 

" Ilitchj, take that poor beast into the place where the cob 
is, and let him drink ; the fever of terror must be quenched, or 
he will sink down, and we shall have difficulty in raising him. 
He has suffered enough for one night. Take in a light, and 
that branch of the ash you brought with you, for fear of 
snakes." 

Then he turned to me saying : 

" I think I have been very economical in the matter of pow- 
der to-night. I happened to make impressions in the right 
places foi once." 

A result of thi3 night's work was, that a young man who 
was undergoing punishment apon the charge of stealing a cow, 
supported by merely circumstantial evidence, was set free. 
He had ever asserted his innocence, but there was .no proof 
that a lion had slaughtered an animal on the spot, and no one 
supposed a lion capable of being bis own " drover ;" although 
imprints of a lion's feet were plainly seen. The facts here 
narrated created a doubt, of which the prisoner had the ben- 
efit ; he was "pardoned," never having committed the crime, 
in truth ! 

I may add, that in this, as in all cases, extreme terror had 
effectually tamed the wild bull. He followed us back to the 
camp like a dog, seeming to fear every bush was a lion. 

— Temple Bar. 

TtLE most troublesome fools are those who have some wit. 



[CONCLUSION OF " THE f LAINTIFF NONSUITED.' ] 

tion, and endeavoring to impress upon her the necessity I felt 
of maintaining my professional honor stainless, aud above sus- 
picion even. This came back indorsed, 'Kiley versus Wolfe. 
The plaintiff nonsuited.' 

" ' The visible tracks of my respected would-be father in 
law,' I said, examining the note closely forother writing, but 
there was nothing else to be found. 

" I admired spirit, when it iras spirit, instead of imperti- 
nence, selfishness, or some other small sin ; but I certainly did 
not admire Wakefield, and he was now Fanny's suitor. If 1 
could not gain her for myself, I felt bound to save her from 
bim, and went to work for that purpose. 

"The chief obstacle to all my plans was the old gentle- 
man, who seemed to be hastening matters to a crisis. I heard 
that Fanny was soon to become Mrs. Wakefield. 

"I had kept up a correspondence with Benway in the Phil- 
lips and Lockshaw matter, and had learned from his last let- 
ter that Wells <fe Co. owned a branch store op the country 
farther, which was filled with goods, and they were doiDg 
finely. 

" I immediately sent a legal acquaintance to Mr. Wolfe, 
with instructions to offer him a thousand dollars for the Well's 
claim, which was gladly accepted, for the Phillips and Lock- 
shaw suit bad been compromised for ten thousand dollars, and 
it was supposed that Wells & Co. could not pay one per cent, 
to any other claimant. 

" I forwarded the notes to Banway, with instructions to at- 
tach the new store of goods, if possible, and then compromise 
for twelve tbousaud dollars — intending to lower the demand 
to 6ix thousand, if necessary. 

" In reply, I received a letter from Benway, telling me if I 
would take ten thousand dollars down, he would send me a 
draft for that. In two weeks the draft came for ten thousand 
dollars, less exchange, and I enclosed it to Mr. Wolfe, duly 
indorsed over to him by me, with my compliments. 

" He came to my office, but I was out ; he went to my hotel, 
and I was out ; but he found me on the street. 

" I bowed to him coldly and was passing on, for I knew my 
man. but he grasped my hand, and said ; ' My dear Riley I 
beg your pardon. I have not done you justice. But the fact 
is, that Wisconsin loss almost ruined me. It would have 
ruined me, I believe, if this draft had not come just as it did. 
It's your money, Riley, and I would not take it under any 
other circumstances, or now, even, only on condition that I 
may pay it back when I get my matters straightened up, and 
collections made.' 

" ' I'm glad to hear, sir, that it has helped you so much,' 
laid I. • The money is yours, of course. Good morning, sir,' 
and I attempted to pass on. 

" ' But I cannot permit this, Riley,' said, he impulsively ; 
'you must come over to dinner.' 

" I made some lame excuse, but he insisted. 

" ' We shall all expect you,' he said, ' for to tell the truth 
Riley, we have been gloomy enough of late — Fanny particu- 
larly. My financial difficulties depressed the whole household. 
Come to dinner to-morrow.' 

" I nodded, having suddenly become a little too much choked 
up to talk much, and walked away. 

"I went there at the appointed time, of course, for Wolfe 
always had one acceptable thing at his table, and that wag 
good-humor. He was princely at his repasts. At first we felt 
formal, but it wouldn't do ; we broke down, and presently 
found our old sel^s again. She is engaged to Wakefield, and 
I was too much of a gentleman to be otherwise than jolly over 
it — so very merry, indeed, that she didn't seem to like it. 

" She had expected sentimental sighs, sheep's eyes, allusions 
to old times, and such things. But the old gentleman poured 
forth a deluge of fun, and I joined him in increasing the good 
feeling. I have since been confidentially informed that I was 
never so briiliant in my life — in fact, perfectly fascinating ! 
I went there regularly to dinner, and ofteu met Wakefield, 
whose day of destiny was drawing near. They were to be 
married in a month — that was fixed. I learned afterwards 
that it had been adjourned over a short time, and I couldn't 
find out the reason. So I went up to Mr. Wolfe's house and 
settled Mr. C. Wakefield at one blow. 

"Gentlemen, I couldn't help it. There is a statue against 
cruelty to animals, and he was suffering. 

" It is a peculiarity of mine, perhaps, that, when a case is 
decided against me, I bear no ill-will : and when it is /or me, 
I always pity my opponent. Therefore it was, that, 4 as a 
man and a brother' lawyer I felt sorry for poor Wakefield 
when Fanny entered on her docket, ' Wakefield versus Wolfe. 
The plaintiff nonsuited.' 

" But my grief was transient, for in that case, as in all cases 
against her, I was then, and still remain, the defendant's at- 
torney, in fact and in law." — Atlantic Monthly. 

The most reluctant slave to vice that we ever saw was a 
poor fellow who had his fingers in oue. 

Be temperate in diet. Our first parents ate themselves 
out of house and home. 



The Californian 



It 



Absconded 1 — The wife whose husband supposed she had 
absconded was freely forgiven, wheu he found she Dad 
only been down to the NEW YORK PHOTOGRAPH GAL- 
LERY to see HOWLAND, and get one dozeu of those beau- 
tiful Card Pictures, THE BEST ever inado in this city. 
Como earJy, if you waut to get a sitting. Remember the 
Place — Nos. 25 and 27 Third street, east side, near Market 
street B. F. HOWLAND, Artist. 



Mateb's Bazaab — R. Mayer offers at his Bazaar, corner 
Piue and Montgomery streets, the greatest variety of jew- 
elry, watches, silver plated ware, guitars, music boxes; 
concertinas, accordeous, opera glasses, etc., etc., to the 
public of San Francisco, and to the country trade, at prices 
that defy competition, and Is determined to close out his 
present stock at greatly reduced rates. His heavy case 
sliver watches from the American Watch Company are 
• uperior to anything ever before offered to tho public. 
These watches are taking the place of heavy gold watches' 
from the fact that the workmanship is superior, the cas- 
ings pure silver, and the prices low. The sale of these 
watches is very extensive on the Pacific coast. Another 
proot that American manufactures cau beat the world. 
The works are made of platina and never get out of re- 
pair. French opera glasses of groat power for sale or 
hire, and all kiuds of musical instruments, eight day fam- 
ily clocks, etc. This is a rare chance to invest your money 
to advantage, at Mayer's Bazaar, southeast corner of 
Montgomery and Pine streets. 

N. B. — An immense assortment of Japanese curiosities 
for sale. 



WAGONS. 



MILLS* EVANS, IMPORTERS OF THOROUGH-BRACE 
Wagons, light express, two and three spring Wagons, 
suitable for milk-men and furniture dealers, and others 
wishing light and durable Wagons. Their Wagons are 
made expressly for the California market, and Mills & 
Evaus' is the only firm which receives Wagons from the 
celebrated manufactory of A. W. Sanborn & Co., Man- 
chester, N. H. This latter firm stands A No. 1 in tho 
east, and their wagons have stood the test of our Califor- 
nia climate, and are soli by Mills & Evans fifty per cent, 
lower than any other establishment on the Pacific coast. 
Call and examine their Wagons, at No. 587 Market street, 
opposite the MctroDolitan market. * 



Medical. — "Yod.vg Man's Fhiend and Protectob," an 
Association for beneficent objects, Young men should 
inform themselves in relation to it, and by applying to, 
the Acre" art. Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple, Post street, 
they wiil be furnished with Prospectus. 



jBJff* WONDERFUL BUT TRUE. — MADAME REMING- 
ton, the world-renowned Astrologistand Somnambulistic 
Clairvoyant, while in a clairvoyant state, delineates the 
very features of the person you are to marry, and by 
the aid of an instrumeut of intense power, known as 
the Psychoraotrope, guarantees to produce a perfect and 
lite like picture of the future husband or wile of the 
applicant, with date of marriage, occupation, leading 
traits of character, etc. Tiiis is no imposition, as testi- 
monials without number can assert. By stating place 
of bfrth, age, disposition, color of eyes and hair, and en- 
closing titty cents and stamped envelope addressed to 
yourself, you will receive the picture by return mail, 
together with desired information. 

Address in confidence, Madams Glbtbude Remington, 
P. O. Box 2'J7, West Troy, N. Y. 



MEDICAL ADVICE. 
Dr. Wm. K. Dohertv's Medical and Surgicai 
Institute is becoming a sine qua iwn to the welfare 
of our State and health of our citizens ; and his 
rapidly spreading reputation, although it may excite 
surprise, is but the signal of skill, and follows as the 
natural effect of such a cause. We are personally 
acquainted with gentlemen who had suffered for 
years under chronic disease, and who had taken ad- 
vantage of every available means, that promised 
relief, but without success, until they called upon 
Dr. Doherty, who, in an incredibly short space of 
time, has given them entire relief. It is gratifying 
to announce this fact, because the Doctor is a gentle- 
niau who seeks, not by defamation of others, to es- 
tablish his reputation, or to rear the superstructure of 
his own upon the ruin of another's fame. The Doc- 
tor conducts his Institute in a manner that must be 
gratifying to "all his patients. He examines, hears, 
advises, and recommends, without charge, and the 
patieut, after hearing his terms for treatment, can 
accept or reject at pleasure. In no case does the 
Doctor make a charge unless he effects a cure. This 
he is able to do, because he feels the confidence 
which long experience has given, and no doubt the 
consolation which appertains to that confidence. 
Persons afflicted with either acute or chronic disease, 
would do well to consult, the Doctor ; at all events, 
it can do no harm, as for consultation he asks no fee ; 
nor does he insist on obedience to his advice unlets 
the patient places himself under his care. His offices 
are on Sacramento street, opposite the Pacific Mail 
Steamship office. — San Francisco News. 

J^ROOKLYN HOTEL, 

1852. SAN FRANCISCO. l866. 

The Proprietor of the above-named Hotel wishes 
to lulorm Ins patrons aud the Travelling Public that he 
has opened that elegant Brick Fireproof Hotel, on the 

S. E. Corner of Pine and Sansome slreels, 

With all the modern conveniences attached to it. 

Gas ana water are supplied throughout the House. The 
Rooms are well ventilated, and the Public will find in this 
Hotel all the comforts of a home. The Hotel is spacious, 
and well adapted for the use of Families. Suits of Rooms 
can be had on reasonable terms. 

A Large Reading Room is attached to the Hotel, 
Containing 500 Volumes of Standard Works, 

Which is entirely for the use of patrons. 
THE CITY COACH, with the name of the Hotel- on It, 
will be in readiness at the Wharf, on the arrival of each 
tteamer, to convey passengers and baggage to the Hotel, 
free of charge. JOHN KELLY, Jr., Proprietor. 

"y^yM. O. BREYFOGLE. 

(Successor to WARE & MOSHER.) 
NO. 26 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
Manufacturer and Dealer In 

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS & SHUTTERS, 

From Kiln-Dried Lumber — at the Lowest Rates. 
Orders from the country will receive prompt attention 



J^OYS! BOYS! BOYS! 

NOW IS THE TIME 
H. M. LOCKWOOD & CO., 
New No. 624) CLAY STREET, (Old No* 

Have received a Largo Stock of 

GENTS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

— AND — 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

Which they are selling 

AT VERY LOW PRICES. 
Every Garment warranted. All are invited to call 
examine our goods. 

H. M. LOCKWOOD & CO. 

624 Clay street, San Francisco- 



RADICAL CURE TRUSSES ! 

LADIES' SUPPORTERS 

Shoulder Braces, etc., 




-ITT ED, AND RELIEF WARRANTED 



GEORGE TIEMAN'S & C O.'S 

NEW YORK BRANCH 
Surgical and Dental Instrument Depot, 
No. 218 MONTGOMERY STREET, San Francisco, Cal., 
(Opposite the Russ' House,) 

J. H. A. FOLKERS. Sole Agent, 
Also keeps Ear Trumpets lor the Deaf, Elastic Stockings 
for Enlarged Veins, etc., Bannseheidt's Rheumatism In- 
strument, Magentic Electro Machines ,etc 



M 



ARTIN'S RESTAURANT, 

633 COMMERCIAL STREET 

Above Montgomery. Meals at all hours. 
The best of Wines, Oysters, Game, and all 
the delicacies of tho season always on hand. 

Private Saloons up stairs for Dinner and V > 

Supper Parties. LEON DfNGEON, Proprietor. 



Q ALIFOKN I A 

COFFEE AND DINING SALOON, i 
(Formerly the German Coffee Saloon, )] 

N03. 612 AND G14 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Between Clay and Merchant, San Francisco. 
J. E. REAGAN .' Proprietor 

This house has undergone a thorough change, both in 
MANAGEMENT and PRICES. A flue Ladies' Saloon has 
beeu fitted up in the rear, where private parties can re- 
ceive every attention in the mo : t comfortable quarters. 
We also keep lunch hot on chafing dishes at the couDter, 
including the finest of Pastry, where customers c»n be 
served quickly and satisfactorily. 

French Breakfasts and Dinners, with Wine, continued 



BONZI&CO., 

Italian Restaurant, 

515 Merchant street, opposite Washington Market, between 
Montgomery and Sansome streets, Sau Francisco. 

MEALS, WITH WINE, 50 CENTS. 

THE CHOICEST COMMODITIES OF THE 
Market served up in tho best stylo of Italian 
and French cookery. 

On the second noor are numerous private, 
rooms, for social or private DINNER PARTIka. coiiee, 
Jhocolato, Wine, Beer, Liqueurs, with every description 
of edible accompaniments, served to order at any hour of 
the day or evening. 



DEMOTED 

To 645 Clay street, a few doors below Kearny. 



DR BLAKE CAN NOW BE FOUND AT 
fcthe above location . Engagements as usual 
;an be made with all those who desire thor- 



ough and F1R.ST CLASS GOLD FILLINGS. 



M 



M 



Lamott's Hat Emporium 

IS THE PLACE TO GET A FASHIONABLE 

HAT OR CAP, 

AND AT PRICES 25 PER CENT. LESS THAN 
ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THIS CITY. 

Do not fail to have one of 

LAMOTT'S HATS! 

CORNER PINE AND MONTGOMERY STREETS. 



^Y ALTER s - PIERCE, 

Manufacturer and Importer of 



fr¥ 11 PIANO-FORTES. 

FACTORY AND WAREROOM, NO. 536 MARKET 
Street, opposito Second. 

Sa- PIANOS TO RENT.-©* 

WALTER S. PIERCE'S 

Piano Manufactory 

Is the most complete on th° Pacific Coist, havin p every 
appliance of machinery for Making or REPAIRING Pianos 
to be found in the largest Eastern Factories ■ 

Old Pianos converted into new, by putting in new inte- 
rior mechanism complete. 




THE FAMOUS 
PI AW O 8 



Ckickering & Son 

Ban received tho endorsement of all the lending Artistes 
of EiKope and America. Testimonials to be seen at tbe 
Agen's". 

Pianos to rent, from $5 to $10. Tuning free. 

KOHLER, CHASE & CO., 

Montgomery street. 



TOWNE & BACON, 
Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 

Than other offices 
^*I n this City, 
53S T ^ them 
IWwWitli a Job, 
And you will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their office is at 536 
Clay St., below Montgom'y, 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 



piONEER IRON SHUTTER WORKS. 
Established 1849. 

John Upstone, 

MANUFACTURER OF FIRE PROOF 

Doors and Shutters, 

Bank Vaults, Balconies, Gratings, Prison Cells, 
Awnings, Stairs, Iron Fence, etc., 

Corner of California and Drumm Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Constantly on hand a lange assortment r.r =«.,.„„ j 
hand Fire-Proof Doors and Shutters? ° SeCOnd 



Edward Bosqui & Co., 

Printers, 

And Blank Book Manufacturers, 
517 CLAY STREET, 

Between Montgomery and Sansome Sta., 
San Francisco. 



gTERETT & CUBERY, 

PRINTERS, 

533 Clay street, San Francisco. 

B. F. STERETT WM. M. CUBERY 

We are prepared to execute in a prompt and satisfac- 
tory manner, all kinds of Book, Job and Card Printing ; 
also, Blank Books manufactured and Paper Ruled to 
order. 



P<OR POSTERS, HANDBILLS, 

AND 

Show Work of All Kinds, 

GO TO THE 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING HOUSE 

OF 

FEANCIS & VALENTINE, 
617 Clay street, and 610, 512 and 514 Commercial street- 



jy O YOU WANT ANY 

PRINTING? 

IF YOU DO, SO TO 

411 CLAY STREET, 

between sansome and battery. 
Printing of every description done on 

short notice and in the best style, by 

M. D. CARR & CO. 



San Francisco Mill. 



HOBBS, GIL MORE & CO., 



manufacturers of 



BOXES, 

Market Street, between Beale and Main, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



For Sale, Mahogany, Spanish Cedar, and other Fancy 
Woods. 



D. A. HACDONALD 
J. H. MACDONALD 



MCG1LL, 
CHIFMAN. 



} {e- 

D. A. MACDONALD & CO., 
SAWING AND PLANING MILLS, 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
DOORS, SASHES, BLINDS AND MOULDINGS, 

Corner o f Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Finishing Work for Buildings constantly on hand, 
and got up to order. 



W. N. MIT.I.F.R J. F. HALEY. 

jyjILLER & HALEY, 

EMPIRE STEAM MILLS, 

NO. 29 FREMONT STREET, 
San Francisco. 
SASH, BLIND, DOOR AND MOULDING FACTORY. 



I. 



H. SMALL, 



Machine Shop, 

BUILDER OF 
Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, 
Also, I H. Small's Patent Boot Screwing Machine. 
Gears of all kind's Cut at Short Notice, 
And at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
Ropairing or all kinds done with Promptness and Dispatch. 

Corner of Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. O. HAN3C0M, 
H. S. SMITH. 



PESDKEGAST. 
W. HANSCOM. 



* M -} HANS COM & CO [l 

Etna Iron Works! 

S. E. corner Fremont and Tehama Streets, San Francisco, 
Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QUARTZ-MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, SAW- 
MILLS, FLOUR- MILLS, 
Dunbar's Improved Self-adjusting 
PISTON PACKING, 
Now so extensively used in the East aud in this State 
Requires no springs or screws; is always steam-tight; 
without excessive lriction, and never gets slack or leaky 

HANSCOM'S CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind now In use In this State or anywhere 
else. All kinds of GRINDERS and AMALGAMATORS 
made to order. Manufactures of the new Prospecting 
Quartz-Mills, consisting of Boiler, Engine, 2-stamp Bat- 
tery and Grinding and Amalgamating Pan, complete, for 
working from one ton per day upwards. Dru wings are 
furnished with each of these mills, so that any competent 
engineer can set it up in running order in two days' time. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER-WHEEL, 
Giving greater power at lower cost than any wheel in use. 

Send for one of our circulars giving full tables. 

All Wheels warranted to give the Power as set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

SOLE MAKERS FOR THIS COAST OF THE " PENDER- 
GAST WHITE IRON STAMP SHOES AND DIES." 

None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. « 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 
at market prices. Particular attention given to drawings 
and specifications ot machinery, which will he made to 
order. The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited. 

tg»U Particular attention paid to HOUSE WORK and 
ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS. 



THEODORE KALLENBERG, 

No. 416 Market street, - - - San Francisco, 

Machinist, 

Maker of Models for Inventors, Drawing Instruments. 
Small Machines. Philosophical Instruments, Scales and 
Weights, all kinds of Brass and Iron Work- 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



rpHE CALIFORNIA 

Building and Savings Bank, 

CALIFORNIA ST., ONE DOOR FROM SANSOME. 
Capital and Deposits, - - - - - $600,000 

WHICH IS LOANED ON PROPERTY. 

LOANS MADE on CITY REAL ESTATE, 
HOUSES, SHIPS, FACTORIES 
AND MERCHANDISE. 

Deposits received at one per cent, per month. 

Money transmitted from the interior, by Express or 
Mail, passed to interest from the day of arrival, and a 
Certificate returned in course of post. 

Strangers may deposit Bonds, Gold Dust, Coin, or Valu- 
able Papers in the Vault, for long or short periods, at a 
small ret t, for which valuables the Compan" will be 
accountable. THOMAS MOONEY, President. 



^JANTY & WAGNER, 

(SUCCESSORS TO J. REGAN,) 

113 Montgomery street, bet. Bush and Sutter. 

N B — All candies sold by us are warranted to be man- 
factured from Stewart's double refined Sogar, and to he 
equal to any manufactured in the State. Country mer- 
chants solicited to examine our Btock and prises. Goods 
delivered to any part of the city free of charge. 



JAMKS C. PABETNSOS 



JOHN J. MA1IONEV. 



►ARKINSON & MAHONEY, 

GILDERS AND MANUFACTURERS 

— OF — 

LOOKING-GLASS AND PICTURE FRAMES, 

No. 333 Kearny street, between Pine and Bush, San 
Francisco. All kinds of Oval Frames. Lithographs and 
Engravings kept constantly on hand. Pictures cleaned 
and varnished. 01 1 Frames rogilt. 



AdamS, Dentist, 423 Montgomery 



12 



The Calitornian. 



THE LOVE OF GOLD. 

A STORY OF" CRIME, BUT NOT OF THE DARKEST DTE. 
CHAPTER I. — THE EVIL COUNSELOR. 

It was io an evil moment that she listened 
to his suggestions. But, alas, she was scarcely 
mistress of her actious when his evil counsels 
prevailed. 

She sat alone in her quiet boudoir. Her 
hands were clasped in agony as she rocked to 
and fro, murmuring to herself. What is it 
that she whispers ? 

" Gold —gold! O yes, it must be gold I" 
The next day she left her home— but not 
forever ! No, only for an hour or so. 

CHAPTER II. A PICTURE OF HOME. 

Tbey had been very — veiy happy, she and 
her Algernon, the husband of her choice. 
Three darling children had blest their union, 
and they had a villa at Bayswater. 

Every night when he returned from the 
Money Market, where had a stall and drove a 
brisk trade, be drew her toward him, and she 
leaned on his shoulder until ber raven tresses 
mingled with the tawny beard that flowed 
over his manly bosom and the intervening 
white waistcoat. 

But that might never-never be again I 

CHAPTER III. — A SAD CHANGE. 

She flew homeward with a guilty conscience! 
She scarce dared to meet the gaze ot the do- 
mestic who opened the door. That domestic 
started, uttering a smothered " 0, my !" But 
Bhe heeded not. She flew up sairs to the 
nursery, and clasped her children to her pal 
pitaticg bosom. 

The little creatures struggle to get away 
from her. The baby went into convulsions. 
They did not recognize her as their mother. 
Wringing her hands wildly, she fled down 
stairs. Algernon had just returned. She met 
him in the passage— trembling, half fainting. 
He looked at her coldly and passed her by. 

She tumbled down flat on the door mat ! 

And why was this ? 

Why? Because her evil counselor, the hair- 
dresser, had prevailed on her to have her hair 
bleached to the fashionable yellow, to be sure ; 
and, of course, it did not become her. 



At a Sabbath school " concert," held in one 
of the prettiest towns in Western New York, 
a portion of the exercises consisted in each 
scholar repeating a verse of Scripture, in which 
Bhould be found the word love. When it came 

to the turn of Miss J , a beautiful lady of 

eighteen, and " in the market," she was unpre- 
pared with the answer ; but before the exer- 
cises were concluded, she remarked to her 
teacher that she had found the verse. It was : 
" I love those who love me, and those who seek 
me early shall find me." Excellent girl that! 

A Sad Case for the Underwriters. — A 
wreck of a woman with a cataract in her eye, 
a waterfall on the back ofher head, a creek in 
her back, forty springs in her hooped skirt, and 
bigh-tied shoes on. 

Hearts, the best card in the chance game 
of matrimony ; sometimes overcome by dia- 
monds and knaves ; often won by tricks ; and 
occasionally treated in a shuffling manner, and 
then cut altogether. 



THE GREAT 



The difference between Whittier'a new poem 
a nu a Massachusetts' schoolmarm is, that while 
one is " The Tent on the Beach," the other is 
bent on the teach. 



Miixineby and Head-Dbesses. — Mrs Winship lias just 
received, per last steamer, the latest Parisian Millinery 
Goods and L icos lor HEAD-DRESS, consisting in part of 
B eakfast Gaps, Point Application, Lace Vallenciumes, 
and the "Widow's Rooche. worn by tbe crown heads 
of Europe, and the only first imported to tne Pacific 
Coast. Queen Emma, while here, replenished her 
wardrobe from the stock then and now on hand, at MRS 
WiNSHIP, No. 23 Post Street, under the Mecnanics" 
Institute. Through the influence of Queen Emma, Mrs 
Winship has filled quite a numher of orders for the 
foreign population of Honolulu. The ladies of San Fran- 
cisco should, cali and examine these beautiful Goods, by 
which means they will secure the Latest Fashionable 
Style=. 



New England k e m e d y ! Jj 



Dr. J. W. POLAND'S 

White - Pine Compound, 

IS NOW OFFERED TO THE AFFLICTED TBP.OUGH- 
out the country, after- having ber'n proved by the test of 
eleven years in the New EngianJ States, where its merits 
have become as well known as the tree lrora which, in 
part, it derives its virtues. 

THE WHITE-PINE COMPOUND CURES i 
Sore Throat, Colds, Coughs, Diptheria. Bron- 
chitis, Spitting of Blood, and Pulmonary 
Affections generally. It is a remarkable 
Remedy for Kidney Complaints, Diabetes, 
Difficulty of Avoiding Urine, Bleeding from 
the Kidneys and Bladder, Gravel, and other 
Complaints. For Piles and Scurvy it will 
be found very valilable. 

Give it a Trial, if you -would learn the 
value of a Good and Tried Medicine. 

It is pleasant, safe an 1 sure. Sold by all Druggists and 
Dealers in Medicine generally. ' 

HOSTETTER, SMITH & DEAN. 
401 and 403 Battery Street, cor. Clay, San Francisco 



Wbat's the "Mattee ? — In passing through Tnird street 
yesterday, we saw crowds of people entering a building 
a few doors below Market street, and we inquired of a 
passer-by what's the matter? He answered that they 
were ening to have th"ir pictures taken in the NEW YORK 
PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY, and the cause of the rush 
wa* that fchil took the best an . cheapest pictures in the 
city;tha inducement must be much to draw so big a 
crowd from Montgomery and the other streets in the 
oortaern part of the city. 




MASONIC TEMPLE, 

Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco. 
TO THE SICK! 

Cures Without Medicines. 

Experience of 25 years [15th (1866) in San Francisco,] 
enables DR. BOURNE to Guarantee Cures 1 He perf»rms 
all he promises — more, if possible. Consultations Free. 
Call or send for circulars. 

10 MASONIC TEMPLE, POST STREET. 



A. FINIGAN'S 




NORFOLK STABLES, 

ELLIS STREET, BETWEEN POWELL AND MASON, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
THE FINEST STABLE KNOWN IN AMERICA. 

Hordes, Buggies, and alt kinds of Carriages to let on rea- 
e onable terms Particular attention paid to boarding 
horses. Ladies' and Gentlemen's Saddle Horse6 always 
on hand. P. A. FIMGAN, Proprietor. 



I REDDING AXD FURNITURE, 
J LIVE GEESE FEATHERS, 

DOWNY PULU, CURLED HAIR, MOSS, AND 
WOOL MATTRESSES. 

— ALSO — 

The sole right to manufacture Ftlleb's Patent Spiral 
Spbing Mattbesses, admitted by everybody to be the 
best, more durable, more elastic, and cheaper than the 
old style Spring Beds. 

A full assortment of Fubxittre, Sheeting, Blankets, 
etc., at extremely low prices, for cash. 

JACOB SCHREIBEB, 
Nos. 121 and 183 Sajisome street, between Bush and 
Pine, Ctn Francisco. 



E. GOLDSMITH, 

Practical Card and Seal Engraver 
AND PLATE PRINTER, 
No. 505 Montgomery street, over Tucker'*. 



JJ0AGL4 ND & XEWS-OM 
ARCHITECTS, 

Southwest corner Sacramento and Kearny streets 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



MERICAN HOTEL, 

Main street. . - . Potaluma. 

EMERSON k LAMBEBTOX, Proprietors. 



OYJS'IHAN & AITKIN, 

Portland Boiler Works, 

311 AND 313 MISSION STREET, 
Between Beale and Fremont streets, -an Francisco. 



Manufacturers of Steam Boilers, high or low pressure- 
Cylinder, Tubular or Flue; Sheet Iron Work; Steam and 
Water Pipe of the best quality, and at more reasonable 
prices than any other estibl snment on the Pacific Coast. 

Beiug Practical Boiler Makers, of long experience, con- 
fining our wboie time and attention to our branch or bus 
iness, and having enlarged our works, aud also added the 
most improved tools in the country, we arc euablcd to 
turn out Boilers more expeditiously than &ny other estab- 
lishment on the Pacific Coast — using none but the best 
quality and brands of Boiler and Sheet Iron and Boiler 
Tubes. Those in want of anything in the above line will 
do well to give us a call. Orders from the country w ill 
receive prompt attention. 

All work warranted according to order. Particular 
attention paid to Repairing Steam Boilers. 



T. J. MOVXIHAS, I „ . . ■ 
JAS. AITKEN, J Proprietors. 



N 



EPTUNE IRON WORKS. 





Corner Mission and Fremont streets, San Francisco. 
MARINE, LOCOMOTIVE AND ALL KINDS OF 

HIGH- PRESSURE STEAM BOILERS 

Manufactured. 

The proprietor imports his own P. H. and B. Iron across 
the Isthmus, and Tubes of every size. Other partie- can 
never block* le the market. He has mad* arrangements 
with the best houses in the East to furnish him with 
everything in the shape of Iron he wants. 

All Boilers guaranteed and tested by C. S. Boiler In 
spector before they are sent out of the shop, at my ex- 
pen-e. tE9_*ll ki'ndB of sheet Iron and Water Pipe, Coal 
Oil Stills, Wrought Iron Worms, etc., manufactured to 
order. OLD BOILKRS REPAIRED. 

D. CAMERON. 



P 



IONEER IRON SHUTTER WORKS. 



Established 1849. 



John Upstone, 

MANUFACTURER OF FIRE-PROOF 

Doors and Shutters, 

Bank Vaults. Balconies, Gratings, Prison Cells, 
Awnings, Stairs, Iron Fence, etc., 

Comer of California and' Druram Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Constantly on hand a large assortment of second 
hand Fire Proof Doors and Shutters. 



t 



H. SMALL, 



Machine Shop, 

BUILDER OF 
Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, 
Also, I H. Small's Patent Boot Screwing Machine. 
Gears of all kin Js Cat at Short Notice, 
And at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
Rapairing of all kinds done with Promptness and Dispatch. 

Corner of Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. o. HANSOOM. 

u. s. sxiru. 



PEXDEBGAST. 
HAKSCOX. 



}HANSCOM & CO " 

Etna Iron Works! 

S. E. corner Fremont and Tehama Streets, San Francisco, 
Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QUARTZ MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, SAW- 
MILLS, FLOUR-MILLS, 
Dunbar's Improved Self- Adjusting 
P1STOS PACKING, 

Now so extensively used in the East aud in this State 
Requires no >prings or screws; is always steam-tight; 
witnout excessive iricticn, and never gets slack or leaky 

HANSCOMS CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind now In u-e In this State or anywhere 
else. All kinds of GRINDERS find AMALGAMATES 
n ade to order. Manufacturer a of the new Prospecting 
Quartz-Mills, consisting of Boiler, Engine, 2-stamp Bat 
tery and Grinding aud Amalgamating Pan, complete, for 
working from one ton per cay upwards. Drawings are 
furnished with each of these mills, so lhatany cuni|Ktcnt 
engineer caa* set it up in running order in two days' time. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER-WHEEL, 
Giving greater power at lower cost than any wheel in use. 

Send for one of our circulars giving full tables. 

All Wheels warranted to give the Power aa set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

SOLE MAKERS FOR THIS COAST OF THE "PENDER 
GAST WHITE IRON STAMP .-HOES AND DIES." 
None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 
at market prices. Particular attention given bo drawings 
and spei ideations ot machinery, wnfes will he male to 
order. The. patronage 01 the public is r'-snectfully solicited. 

UJh. Particular attention paid to HOUSE WORK and 
ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS. 



r £ U B CALIFOR N IAN' S 
SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
J. D. Arthur & Co., corner of California and Davis. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Townsend & Wyncken, 406 California. 

AUCTIONEERS. 
Cobb & Sinton, 407 California street. 

BALL AND RACKET COURT. 
Thomas Kelly, 846 Howard street. 

BILLIARD SALOONS. 
A. B. Brown, 32S Montgomery street. 

BOWLING ALLEYS. 
Wholers k Steil, Pine and Montgomery, (Russ House. 

BOOKS. 

E. F. Arnold, 538 Market street near Montgomery. 
A. Roman k Co., 417 and 419 Montgomery street. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 
Wentworlb,Hobart & Co, 1 wholesale manufac.) 210 Pine 

CARPETS. 

P. F. Loughran k Co. ,407 Sansome street. 

CLOTHING. 
H M. Lockwnod k Co., 624 Clay street. 
J. R Mead k Co., corner Montgomery and Bush streets 
William Sherman, 412 Sansome. corner Commercial. 
Quincy Hall, 645, 547, and 540 Washington street. 

COAL OIL, LAMPS, ETC. 
Dell.Cranna A- Co*, (wholesale) 513 Front street. 
A. C. Dielz & Co., (wholesale,) 621 Front street. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Blake, removed to 645 Clay street* 
Dr. Wm. B. McAllister, removed 18 Third street. 
N . T. Wnitcomb, 206 Tbiri 1 , near Howard. 

DANCING ACADEMY. 
Coghill's, Congress Hall, Bush, above Montgomery. 
Fuller & McCarthy, 727 Market, near Ti 

DRY GOODS. 
Meagher, Taaffe & Co.. 9 Montgomery street. 
Mosgrove & Blakely, 222 Third, near Howard. 
Buyer &• Reich, S W corner Juckson and Stockton. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Waters k Dillon, (Billiard Saloon,) 314 Montgomery et 

G. G. Burnett, (Apotl.eiary,) 330 Montgomery. 
Shepardson k Gates, (successors to R. Hall & Co. ,) cor- 
ner Sansome and Commercial, 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 
Pacific Business College, 751 Market street, above Third. 
Prof. Williams" Commercial Academy, 869 Mission st. 

FURNITURE. 
Goodwin k Co., 510 and 528 Washington streets. 
N. P. Cole k C". , 21 Sutter and 524 Market streets. 

GROCERS. 

Slosson & Ladd, southwest corner Folsom and First. 
Haskell & Co. , Market and Sutter Sis. below tbe Market 
W. M. Noble & Co., cor Howard and Tweirth streets 

HATTER. 

Lamott (wholesale and retail) 227 Montgomery street 

HAY AND GRAIN. 
J. B. Holmes k Co., 110 Market street. 

HOTELS. 

Brooklyn. John Kelly. Jr.. Sansome. corner Pine. 
Chicago, E. W. Heiniburg & Co. . 220 Pacific street. 

John Steinmann, 323 Pine. 

INSURANCE. 

Accidental and Casualty, R. L A- F. Ogdcn, Montgom- 
ery street, corner California. 
Brooklyn Life, S T King, Agent, S E cor Montg'y k Pine 
Equitabfe Lite, R. L. k F. Ogdeu, Montgomery, corner 
California. 

Manhattan, R. B. Swain & Co.. Ag It, 206 Front, cor Cal 

Firemens Fund Ins. Co. , S.E. cor. Montg'y and Piue 
Occidental Ins Co. ,S. W. cor. Montgom'y and California 
Pacillc Ins. Co. , 436 California street. 

LADIES' BIJOUTERIE, CLOAKS, ETC. 
Rosenblatt's, 123 and 125 Montgomery street. 

L1VERT AND SAL.I STABLE. 
Philip Morsbead, removea to Howard, near Fifth. 
White & Young, 211 Pine street. 

LUMBER. 

Armstrong, Sheldon k Co., corner Mission and .'pear 

streets. 

MILITARY GOODS AND REGALIA. 
T. Rodger6 Johnson, Odd Fellow 's Hall, 325 Monlg'ry St. 
NOTARY PUBLIC, 

H. S. Tibbey, 604, Montgomery street 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERIE8. 
New York, B. F. Howland proprietor, i6 Third street, 
below Market. 

PIANOS. MUSIC, ETC. 
M. Gray, 613 Clay street. 

W. S. Pierce, lemoved (0 534 Market. 01 posite Second 

C. Wtiderhold & Co., 085 Market near Third. 

PHOTOGRAPHS. CUTLERY, SPECTACLES, ETC. 

Lawrence & Houscwortb, 317 aod 319 Montgomery st. 

* REAL ESTATE AGENTS. 

Paly A; Hawkins, 520 Montgomery street. 
Darn k Sutherland, 320 Montgomery. 

Geo. W. Chapin, 338 Montgomery. 
John l'forr, 328 Montgomery. 

3ESTAU RANTS. 
Bivalve, Nolting k Sp-een. 640 Market, near Kearny. 
Ladies' Refreshment Saloon, Swain k Brown, 636 Market 
Magnolia, 143 Third street. 

Market, by Felix and Guslars Besson, 620 Merchant. 
Helvetia, johnjury k Bros. , 524 Merchant street. 
Sag son's, 506 Montgomery street. 

SALOONS. 

Rossell k Holding's Exchange, 622 Marketstreet. 
Charter Oak, Frank Kelly, N E cor Third and Howard* 
Razzctli k Co.'s. 62" Washington, above the Market. 
Jones' Sample Rooms, S.E. cor. Montgomery and CaL 

V. Squarza. 44 Lcidesdoi ffstrccl. 
Coatcs k Henderson, 37 Suiter street. 

SCALES. 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson, Depot for Fairbanks' Scales 

120 California street. 

SEWING MACHINES. 
Grover it Baker, R. G. Brown, 116 Montgomery. 
The Florence, office 111 Montgomery street. 
Wheeler k Wilson, corner Montgomery and Sacramento. 

STOVES AND TIN WARE. 
A. Swigert, corner Fifth and Folsom. 

TOYS, ETC. 
Feldbuth ft C". , 207 Montgomery street 
A. Kohler, 620 Washington street. 

WATER-CURE INSTITUTE. 
Dr Bourne's Pioneer, 10 Post, near Montgomery} 

WOODAND COAL YARD. 
Fly mi 4 O'Gra-ly, 860 Howard streat 



The Californlan. 



13 



EACH HEART HAS ITS SOMEBODY. 

Oh, Alice! what are you doing, 

Sitting alone in your room 1 
The others down stairs are dancing ; 

Yon must not stay in the jloom. 
What is the matter," my darling ? 

Your voice is husky with tears ; 
And your cheek was wet when I kissed it — 

There — whisper — nobody hears. 

No answer — must 1 conjecture ? 

Is some one you love to blame 7 
Has somebody cross'd or vex'd you? 

Hush, dearest, I use no name ! 
There's no need to flush so crimson, 

For what have I said or done? 
Isn't somebody some one's darling? 

Each heart has its Number One ! 

Perhaps yon will scarce believe it, 

Bat, a long, long time at;o, 
I'd a face that was not uncomely, 

ADd I'd friends who told me so. 
This wrinkled skin then was polisb'd, 

These dim eyes were clear and bright, 
My hair had a shade as golden 

As yours when you face the light. 

Listen! I'll tell you what happen'd — 

The same happens ev'ry day ; 
Somebody told me he loved me. 

And I gave mv heart away ! 
We parted — he named a twelvemonth ; 

He vow'd to be true and trust. 
Ah, well !— I will put it briefly — 

His vows were written in dust! 

We parted— and worse than distance 

Was the world that crept between ; 
The glowing lights of the preseut, 

Which deadened what once had been. 
He forgot me when I was absent, 

He went after something new — 
Alice, don't look bo indignant, 

'Tig what hundreds of people do ! 

Come, if you misdoubt my meaning, 

I'll tell you what chanced to-night. 
Did you see that old man down stairs, 

Whose hair was so thin and white ? 
If I remember properly, 

You stood in the corridor ' 
When, in the throng of careless guests, 

He came through the eutrance-door. 

Do you remember our meeting ; 

Our hands how quietly clasped ; 
The long, calm gaze in each other's eyes ; 

And the silence that elapsed, 
Before our hearts recovered speech 7 

Well, people would never have thought 
That he had once been my somebody ; 

Even you discovered nought. 

Yes, it is just as I tell you — 

After many bitter years 
We met. with no show of feeling, 

No sighings, reproaches, tears. 
We met but as mere acquaintance, 

With greetings constrained and cold ; 
Only a glance of wonder 

That each should have grown so old. 

He spoke— but his very acceuts 

Were changed from their former tone, 
That querulous voice was never 

The voice of my love — my own ; 
'Twas the voice of the gouty husband 

Of her in maroon and lace, 
Who sat by Sir John at dinner, 

And grew so red in tbe face. 

So, Alice, don't sit here moping 

And sighiug for some one's sake ; 
When the world is made up of changes 

There's no fear vour heart will break ; 
For even tbe loved and injured 

Get over the pain at last. 
Grow wiser, calmer and better 

For lessons learned in the past. 



An insurance agent, urging a citizen to get 
his life insured, said : "Get your life insured 
for ten thousand dollars, and then if you die 
next week, the widder'e heart will sing for 

joy-" 



XfATHANIEL GRAY & CO., 
UNDERTAKERS, 
CITY AND COUNTY SEXTON, 
641 Sacramento street, Corner of Webb 

-:ole agents for BARSTOW'S PATENT METALLIC 
BURIAL CASES and CASKETS. 



PHILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

Jorner Sio-Jad *ad Fojsom streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

HOELSCHER Sc. WIELAND, 

Proprietor* 




WINE SALOON. 
Union Saloon.— C. H. Cordesis the proprietor of 
the Union Saloon, Market street, a few doors south 
of Fremont, where is to be found the choicest wines 
and liquors. Mr. Cordes prides himself on his Ken 
tncky Whisky, which is very old and oily. The 
"Davis" brand whisky drinkers should by all means 
call and test this whisky. Hot lunch is set on the 
table from 10 till 2. 



California Wines. 

Vintage 1862. 

THE UNDERSIGNED OFPRS FOR SALE SOME 
very choice Wiues, of the above naim d vintage 
That connoisseurs, all interested in the development of 
toia magnificent resource of our Stale, and the public 
generally, may be convinced that California is able to pro 
duce as good "Wino (when properly treated and of sultl- 
cient age) as other parti of the Wine producing regions 
of the globe, attention is respectfully called to ihcse 
Wines, by A. S. LOWNDES, Wine Merchant, 

311 Battery Street, S. F. 



u O UR 0PERA- " 

CAPT. JOHN H. MAY, 
615 WASHINGTON STREET, 615, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
Opposite Maguire's Opera House. 



JOHN TAYLOR, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 

NO. 16 THIRD STREET, 
Between Market and Stevenson Streets., San Francisco. 



THE BEST FAMILY WINES 
IN THE CITY 

— Are to be fouud at — 

HOADLEY & GO'S 

533 Merchant street, under 
Pacific Fruit Market. 

%S* Cull and try our Sonoma Champagne, Vega del Rio, 
Sonoina Fort, Reil and White Wines, Wino ant Brandy 
Bitters, and all the varieties usually found in a Calitoruia 
Wine Cellar. 




DUNBAR'S EXCHANGE, 
No. 223 Bush Street, 
Bet. the Occidental and Cosmopolitan Hotels. 

fS- HARRY RIKER would be pleased to see his 
old triends at any hour of the day. 

Hot Lunch every day from 11 a. m. till 2 P. M. 

J. W. DUNBAR, Proprietor. 



FAUST CELLAR, 

Beer and Wine Saloon, 

Southeast corner of Clay and Montgomery streets, 
ban jTanclsou. 



A. L. THIELE, 



Proprietor 



ALWAYS ON HAND, Wholesale and Retail, West- 
phalia Hams, Russian CAVIAR, Sardines, Ancho- 
vies, Swiss and Limburg Cheese, aud other European 
Delicacies. flf5"The liuest braudsof Liquors, Wines and 
Cigars ; Seltzer Water. 

FISHING AND HUNTING PARTIES fitted out at the 
shortest notice. , 



jyjARTIN GROSTETTA, 

LATE OF VIRGINIA CITY, 

Would respectfullv Inform his friends and the public tha 
he has purchased "the WELL-KNOWN SALOON previous- 
ly occupied by THOS. DOYLE, 535 SACRAMENTO ST., 
above the What Cheer House. The best kind of Wines, 
Liquors aud Cigars always on hand. Passengers' Stores 
carelully put up to order. 



pACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.'S 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 
NEW YORK, JAPAN AND CHINA, 

WILL BE DISPATCHED AS FOLLOWS : 

Leave Folsom street Wharf at 11 o'clock a. m. of the 
following dates, for PANAMA, connecting via Panama 
Railroad, with one of the Company's splendid steamers 
from ASPIN WALL for NEW YORK. 
On 10th, 18th, aud 30th of each montn that has 30 days. 
On 10th, 19th, and 30th of each mouth that has 31 days. 
When the 10th, 19th and 30th fall on Sunday, they will 
leave on Saturday preceding ; when the 18th falls on Sun- 
day, they will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th touches at 
Mauzanillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departure of 19th connects with French Transatlantic 
company's steamer for St. Nazaire,and English steamer 
for South America. 

Departure of 10th connects with English steamers for 
Southampton and South America, aud P. R. R. Co.'s 
steamer for Central America. 

STEAMERS FOR MAY. 
May 30th — SACRAMENTO, Capt. J. M. Cavarly, connect- 
ing with OCEAN QUEEN, Capt Maury. 
Passengers will be berthed through. Baggage checked 
hrough — 100 pounds allowed each adult. 
Surgeon on board. Medicine and lUteodance free. 
These steamers will positively leave at 11 o'clock. Pas- 
sengers are requested to have their baggage on board be- 
fore 10 o'clock. 

Through tickets to Liverpool by tbe "Cunard," In- 
man" and "National" Steamship Lines can be obtained at 
P. M. S. S. Co.'s office in San Fruncisco. 
For Merchandise Freigbt apply to Wells, Fargo & Co. 
Tbe splendid steamship COLORADO will be dispatched 
on July 3d, tor Hongkoug via Kuriagiwa, carrying pas- 
sengers, mails and freight. 

For Passage and all other information, apply at Pacific 
MailSteamsbip company's office, corner of Sacramento and 
Loidesdorff streets. 

OLIVER ELDRIDGE, Agent. 



T 



HE CELEBKATED PIANOS 




J. B. DUNHAM, P. O. LIGHTE & CO., 
AND ERNEST G ABLER, 

Are warranted for FIVE YEAR? 5 , and indorsed by the 
LEADING PIANISTS of AMERICA as SUPERIOR IN 
STRUMENTS. 

Sole Agents — C W1EDERHOLD & CO , 

6S5 Market street, near Third. 




QREAT TRIUMPH ! 

STEINWAY & SONS 

Were awarded the FIRST PRIZE 
MEDAL at the late great _ 
INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION AT LONDON, over the 
wo hundred and sixty-nine Pianos entered for competition 
from all parts of the world. 

The Special Correspondent of the New York Times says ; 

u Messrs. Steinway & Sons' indorsement by the Jurors 
is emphatic, and stronger and more to the point than that 
of any European maker." 

A constant supply of the above superior instruments can 
be found at the Agent's, 

M. GRAY, 613 Clay street. 
PIANO TUNING done by a first-class Workman, from 
Steinway & Soil's Factory, New York. 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

No. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

All kinds of Brass, 
Composition, Zinc, 
and Babbitt Mela 
Castings, furnished 
at Ike shortest notice- 
Brass Ship-Work aj 
all kinds, Spikes, 

Sheathing Nails, Rudder Braces, Hinges, etc. , constantly 
on hand and made to order. Also, manufacture Ship and 
Steamboat Bells aud Gongs o r superior-tone. 

All kinds of Steam , Liquor, Water, Oil, and Flange 
Cocks and Valves made and repaired. 

Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings anil 
Connections of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dis 
patch. PRICES MODERATE. 

V. KINGWELL. JOS. H. WEED, SAM'L WHITE. 




SAN FRANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

Northeast corner Fremont and Mission streets, 
Manufacturers of 
MARINE AND STATIONARY ENGINES, 
Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Mining 
Pumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

ALSO, 

Wine, Cider, Cotton ami Tobacco Presses of tht lates* 
Improved Patterns. 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS. 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand ; Quartz Mill S.io- sanii 
Dies warranted to be made of the best white iron. 
Dunbar's Improved Sclt-Adjusting Piston-Packing, re- 
quires no springs or screws; i-^ always Btesfi)*tigh | . witS 
out excessive friction, and never gets ?lnrl< . r i**. kv. 

MACHINERY, OF ALL DE-CKIPTiONS, ' 
Bought, sold, or exchanged. B<»U Cotiiisg anj CnsLjnys 
at the lowest market rates. 

DEVOK. D1NSMORE & O . 



P. COLE & CO., 

WHOLESALE 

Furniture Warehouse, 




No. 314 Pine street, San Francisco. 

LOWEST RATES AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK ON THE 
COAST. 

RETAIL STORE, 

Nob. 524 Market, and 21 Sutter streets — next door to 
the Metropolitan Market. 



JOHN HAGAN, 



Marble - Worker, 

MARKET ST , OPPOSITE LINCOLN SCHOOL 
HOUSE, between Fifth and Sixth. 

Marble Mattels, Grates, Monuments, Head- 1 
stones, Cemetery Copings, and all kinds of 
Marble Work executed on most reasonable! 
terms. Particular attention paid to the placioi 
of Tombstones at Lone Mountain or Catvaryl _ 
Cemeteries. N. B — Country orders promptly attended to. 




B 



OWMAN &. CO., 

Dealers in Stoves and Tin Ware, 

Muiu strget, Petaluma. 




MACCAR0N1, VER MICEL LI, 

- PASTE ^FARXttlA.-' 

C 706^-51^12^067) 

SAN ^FRANCISCO. " 



IMACChW 




R. MEAD & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FINE C LO THIN G, 

AND 

Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

TRUNKS, VALISES, CARPET BAGS, ETC., 
1200 & 202 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Corner of Bush, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Asphaltum Roofing. 

PAVEMENTS, ROOFING, 
CELLAR FLOORS, WATER HOUSES, 

And all kinds of 

Asphaltum Work, 

Done at shortest notice, and at moderate prices, by 
M. BONNET, 
Office— Express Building (up stai.-s), 
N. E. cor. Montgomery and California sts., San Fruncisco 



AT THE REGULAR 



C. E. COLLINS & CO., 

603 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Nos. 42 and II Nassau Street, 

NEW YORK. 
Dealers in* American, Swiss and English 
WATCHES, 

JEWELRY AND ATERIALS. 
3 

4^-vi'e have made arrangements to tuy AMERI- 
CAN WATCHES in large quantities from ihe Fac 
tory, and will receive a discount on the regulai 
Wholesale Prices. We will hereafter 

Retail the American Watches 

AT r fel L Oil 

The Regular Wholesale Prices. 

/op Our only profit being the small 

E- \P er cent, allowed by buying in 
.'>* arge quantities. 



OWE'S NEW STYLE 



FAMILY SEWING MACHINES. 
GREAT IMPROVEMENT— JUST RECEIVED. 

ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR FINE WORK. Also, 
Braiding, Hemming, etc. The advantage these Machines 
halve is extreme simplicity, very strong and durable, not 
liable to get out of or<'er — adapted equally well to all 
grides of work. The Howe should be examined by all 
contemplating purchasing. H. A. DEMING, 

137 Kearny street, S. W, cor. Sutter, San Francisco, Cal 



IF there is a Flor- 
ence Sewing Ma- 
chine within a 
thousand miles of 
San Francisco, that 
is not giving entire 
satisfaction, if I am 
informed of it, it will 
be attended to with- 
out express charge 
or expense of any 
kind to the owner. 
Samuel Hill, Agent, 
111 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 



14 



The Calitornian. 



EE PEN TAN CE. 



A kitten once to its motber Baid : 

"I'll never more be good ; 
But 1 11 «o and be a robber fierce, 

And live in a dreary wood, 

Wood, wood, wood, 

And live in a dreary wood." 

II. 

It climbed a tree to rob a nest 

Of young and tender owls; 
But tbe branch broke oft' and the kitten fell, 

With six tremendous bowls! 

Howls, howls, howls, 

With six tremendous howls ! 

III. 

Then up it rose, and scratched its nose, 
And went home very sad : 
" Oh ! motber dear, behold me here, 
I'll never more be bad, 

Bad, bad, bad, 
I'll never more be bad." 

Prejudice and Charity. — It is safe to say 
that by far the greater number of our antipa- 
thies are founded on unjust prejudice. Give 
them the opportunity of free explanation with- 
out fear of rebuff or coldness, and the men ycu 
dislike most will show you that you ought to 
like them. If you doubt this, ask yourself 
whether you do not feel that you could effect a 
similar change, with occasion, in the sentiments 
of those who dislike yourself. The answer 
with the right thinking and generous can 
ecarcely be equivocal. We are too much in 
the habit of forgetting, what is nevertheless 
strictly true, that we owe a certain duty— a 
duty of kindness, of fraternal regard, of mutual 
encouragement, in this dusty road of life to 
every living soul we encounter in it. There is 
little of the spirit of Christianity in a heart 
which, its attention directed to this truth, can 
turn coldly away from it. The turmoil and 
hurry of life, and especially of business life, is 
unfavorable to the candid survey of apparent 
minutis like those of commonplace antipa- 
thies, and the fact should make us persistent 
and energetic in considering and correcting 
them. For nearly all of us there are cordial, 
trusty friends to be gained by no greater effort 
than that which will summon the magnanimity 
to suppress or conquer frivolous and unmanly 
antipathies. We think that those reflectiocs 
are even better applicable to women than to 
men. The greater part of the feuds and aver- 
sions, the scandals and petty hatreds of society, 
are attributable to such ignoble sources as 
those we have discussed. Dislike founded up- 
on incidents which most people are ashamed 
to mention, is a hundred time* more common 
than that which is due to incidents which are 
acknowledged and palpable. The whole sub- 
ject, discuss it as we may, brings us unfailingly 
to appreciate the great need — the unchristian 
deficiency — of our modern society, which is 
simply and in a word the diffasion and practice 
of charity. — Round Table. 

" May I be married, ma," asked a pretty 
young miss of sixteen. " What do you want 
to get married for?" inquired her mother. 
" Why, ma, you know the children have never 
seen any one married, and I thought it might 
please them a little, that's all " " Nonsense, 
you can't fool me," remarked the old lady 
with a significant shake of tbe head. 



Tyler Brothers, 

J0BfB MjLwi Market si., cor. Third, AfSfM pA 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
SCHOOL BOOKS, 

STATIONERY, 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, 

BLANK BOOK?, 

PORTFOLIOS, 

JUVENILE BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S PICTURE BOOKS, 

FANCY ARTICLES, Etc. 

ESPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

LADIES' STATIONERY, 

Which we Stamp with Initials 
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE. 

WEDDING AND - VISITING CARDS 

Engraved, Written or Printed. 



s 



TOCKDaLE house, 

Corner Mam aod Oak streets, Petaluma 

H. stuck.!) ALK Proprietor 



JgSTABLISHED IN 1851. 

Lawrence & Houseworth, 




317 AND 319 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

THE LARGEST OPTICAL INSTRUMENT Es- 
tablishment on the Pacific Coast. Import all 
tbeir own goods direct from European and Amer- 
ican manufacturers, and havo a larger and more 
complete assortment than all other dealers com- 
bined 

SPECTACLE&and EYE-GLASSES warranted to 
suit the sight in every particular. 

Double sighted Spectacles, Tinted Spectacles 
and Brazilian Pebble Spectacles of the most ap- 
proved torm. 

Those who have been disappointed at other es- 
tablisbments will certainly be pleased with the 
Spectacles they purchase irom us. 

2f. B. — Inferior Glasses are not sold 
by us to the unicary for Brazilian 
Pebbles. 

LAWRENCE & HOUSEWCRTH, 
OPTICIANS, 
317 and 319 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



o 

p 

T 

I 

c 
I 

A 
N 

s 



Complete Catalogues of Optical Instruments furnished free. 



Beauty! 

Auburn, Golden, Flaxen and Silken Curls, 

PRODUCED BY THE USE OF PROF. DE BREUX 
FRISER LE CHEVEUX. 
One application warrant* d to curl tbe most straight 
and stubborn hair of either sex into wavy ringlets, or 
heavy massive curls. Has been used by the fashion- 
ables of Parts and London, with tbe most gratifying 
results. Does no injury to the liair. Price by mail, 
scaled and post paid, $1: Descriptive circulars mailed 
free. Address 

BERGER, SHUTTS & CO., Chemists, 

No. 285 River street, Troy, N. Y. , 
Sole Agents for tbe United States: 



Don't Read This! 



PORK TRIMMINGS § GIVEN AWAY. 

PRICES: 

Pigs' Heads 6 cente 

Pigs' Feet : 7 cents 

Pigs' Tongues 10 cents 

Tails 7 cento 

Spare Ribs 10 cents 

Sausage Meat g cents 

Pork Roast 10 cents 

Sugar Corel Hams : 18 cente 

Breakfast Bacon 18 cents 

Leaf Lard 15 cnets 

The above are from grain-led Hogs. 

No. 1 American Beef from 5 to 10 cents 

Sugar Cured Smoked Beef 12}£ cents 

Choice Mutton 5 to 7 cents 

FOR SALE — 1,000 South Down SHEEP. 

WILSON k STEVENS, 
508 Market street, 
9 Sutler street. 



D. 



GH1RARDELLI <fc CO.'S 



Italian Manufactury, 

415 and 417 JACKSON ST. , SAN FRANCISCO, 
Manufacturers and Dealers In 
PLAIN, SWEET, CINNAMON AND 

VANILLA CHOCOLATES; 
PREPARSD COCOA, COCOA PASTE, 

CRACKED COCOA, COCOA SHELLS, etc , etc. 
PURE GROUND OLD JAVA COFFEE AND 

COSTA RICA COFFEE; 

CHARTRES AND RIO COFFEE; 

GREEN COFFEE OF EVERY QUALITY. 
CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS: 
N: B — Ghirnrdelli's Choco'ato is manufactured by 
steam from Cocoa of the Quest quality, imported direct. 
In excellence and delicacy of flavor, it is superior to any 
imported Chocolate: 



rpHE SIGN OF THE BIG GLOVE. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 
25 Post street, between Montgomery and Kearny streets. 

J. F. SNOW, THE "GLOVE MAN." CLEANS 
Furs without removing the lining. All kiuds of| 
Dresses — including Stage and Partv Dresse 
WITHOUT RIPPING. Woolen Goods, shawls, Buck 
and Kid Gloves, Buck Underveste, Feathers, etc., etc He 
dyes Kid Gloves and Feathers. 

RING'S VEGETABLE AMBROSIA FOR THE HAIR FOR 
SALE. 



Peet & Son, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS, 
No. 315 BATTERY STREET, 
Nex Door to Commercial Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



"Je^ATURE UNVEILED, 

AT THE 

PACIFIC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY AND SCIENCE 
■ Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 
Between lifornia and Pine 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK BREWERY, 
Corner Powell and Francisco Sts. 

Capitol Stock $200,000, divided in Two Thousand 
Shares of $100 each. 

THEODORE MEETZ President 

WM. ERZGRABER ..Vice President 

J. G. WATER MANN Secretary 

FABIAN JOOST TRtSTKKS. hennin(; koster 

HERMANN WENDT, FREDERICK BRUNS, 

HERMANN SCHWARZE, PETER MEYER. 

The i.bove Company intend to establish a reputation 
for making the best 

Ale, Porter, and Lager Beer 

In the country, and respectfully solicit the patronage of 
their friends and tbo public generally. 
♦3, All orders from the country promptly filled and 
delivered free of charge in the city. 



WILLIAM JAMES, I DAVID MEEKER, I „ _ 

Newark, N.J. | j. oobbledice, ' | San Francisco. 

jyjEEKER, JAMES & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

Wagon & Carriage Materials, 

NOS. 12 AND 14 PINE STREET. 

The Largest Establishment on the Pacific Coast for the 
supply of materials for 

WAGONS, TRUCKS, 
CARTS, OMNIBUSSE3, 



CARRIAGES, COACHES, 

EXPRESS WAGONS, 
BUGGIES, SULKIES, Etc. 
Also, Importers of 

GREGG'S TENONING MACHINES, 

Hub Boxing Maehtnes, Thimble Skeins for Wood 
Axles, Hub Bands, Axle Clips. Shaft Shackles, 
Malleable Iron Castings, Concord Axles and 
Springs, 

Orders from tbe country solicited and promptly 
atteuded to. MEEKER, JAMES & Co. 




REMOVAL. REMOVAL. 

Larkins & Co., 



Manufacturers of every description of 

C A R R i_A G E S . 

CONCORD WAGONS, Ranch Wapons and Buspiea 
made to order, ti") .All kinds of Jobbing and Carnage 
Paintmg done at the shortest notice. 

KS~ New Manufactory Nos. 631 and 633 Howard street, 
corner of Hubbard, between Second aud Tuird, 
San Francisco. 



A . F0LS0M, 




Carriage Manufacturer, 

No. 531 California street, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny streets, San Francisco. 

EVERY DESCRIPTION OF CARRIAGES, EXPRESS 
Wagons, Buggies, etc , made to order, of tbe best 
materials ;ind workmanship. 

Repairing and General Blacksmlthing done with prompt- 
ness, and at prices to suit tbe limes. 



s 



AUL & McARRON, 



Manufacturers of 
STAGE AND THOROfJGHBRACE WAGONS, 
NO. 679 and 581 MARKET STREET, 

Near Second Street, San Francisco. 

Makes to order all kinds of Carrifige and Buggy Work, 
Express and Thoroughbrace Wagons aDd Stage Work. 

A generul assortment of new and second band Wagons 
on hand. Jobbing dono with neatness and dispatch- 



Pollard & Carvill, 

Dealers in and Manufacturers of 

LIGHT CARRIAGES 

AND BUGGIES, 

37 and 39 Webb street, 
Between Sacramento and California. 

Also, Repairing, Blacksmithing. Painting and Trim 
ming done with neatness and dispatcn. 




O R N S ! 

DR. V. POPPER, 



c 

Surgeon Chiropedist 

No 20 Montgomery street, between Post and Sutter, 
San Francisco. Ofllce hours from 9 a . ■ to 5 p. m. 

Offers his services to the public as an Operator on such 
excrescences as hard and soft corns, enlarged joints, club 
nails, bunions, nails penetrating the Scan, warts, etc. 



pURE AND MARINE INSURANCE. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY 
OP SAN FRANCISCO. 
Nos. 416 and 418 California Street. 

INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY. 

Cash Capital, .... §750,000 

The California Lloyds, 

HAVING CONSOLIDATED WITH THE UNION INSUR- 
ANCE COMPANY, JANUARY 1, IMS, THIS COMPANY 
ARE NOW PREPARED 10 EFFECT MARINE AS WELL ' 
AS FIRE INSURANCE UPON THE MOST FAVORABLE 
TERMS. 

LOSSES PROMPTLY AND EQUITABLY ADJUSTED 
AND PAID IN GOLD COIN. 



Directors. 
J. Mora Mors, Benjamin Brewster, 

James Otis, Llovd Tevis, 

Wm. E. Barron, The*. H. Selby, 

J. G. Kittle, NicBolag Lumng, 

Joseph A. Donohoe, John Parrott, 
M. J. O Coi.nor, J. Underbill, 

1 Friedlauder. M. D. Sweeny, 

Moses Heller, C. N. Felton, 

Lafayette Maynard, James I'm Ian, 
Charles L. Low, Uustave Tout-hard, 

Jacob Scholle, Michael Castle, 

James Mows, Nicholas Larco, 

Joseph Seller, N. G. Kittle, 

L. H. Allen, Wm. C. Talbot, 

Wm. Hooper, Patrick McAraD, 

C. Temple Emmet, Geo. C. Johnson, 

Josx-ph Brandenslein, Caleb T. Fay, 

B. F. Hastings, Sacramento. 
L. Cunningham, William Smith, 

Marvsville. 

CALEB T. FAY, President. 
CHARLES D. HAVEN. Secretary. 
GUSTAYE TOUCHARD, Mariue Director. 



QCCIDENTAL 

Insurance Company, 

Southwest corner Montgomery and California streets. 

INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY. 



Capital Stock, 



S300.000 



LOSSES PAID IN UNITED STATES GOLD COIN. 

THIS COMPANY will insure againEt loss by Fire on any 
Dwelling House, Buildings. Merchanue or other proi>cr- 
ty, situated In the ?tate of California. The largest sum 
they will take on any one risk is thirty thousand dollars. 

C. CHRISTIANSEN, Pre'st. 
J. GREEN EBAUM, Vice President. 
B. Rothschild, Secretary. 



^JANHATTAN INSURANCE CO. 

OF NEW YORK. 

IN CO RPOR ATED 1881 . 

Cash Capital and Surplus 81,250,000 

Insurance effected against both 

Fire and Marine Risks, 

AT THE LOWEST RATES. 

Losses promptly adjusted, and paid in United 
States Gold Coin. 

B. B. SWAIN & CO., Agents, 
20C Front street, San Francisco. 



Ayer's Sarsaparilla 

TO 

Purify the Blood. 

NOT A FEW OF THE WORST DISORDERS THAT 
atllict mankiud arise from the corruption tbat acru- 
mulates in the blood. Of all tbe discoveries tbat have 
been mudc to purge it out, none have been found wbicb 
could equal in effect Avkh's Compound Extract of 
Sarsapabiixa. It cleaDses and renovates the blood, in- 
stills tbe vigor of health into the system and purges out 
the humors which make disease. It stimulates the 
healthy functions of the body, and expels tbe disorders 
that grow and rankle in tbe blood. Its extraordinary 
virtues are not yet widely known, but, when they are, it 
will no longer be a question what remedy to employ in 
the great variety of afflicting diseases that require an 
alterative remedy. Such a remedy, that could be relied 
on, has long been sought for, and now, for the first time, 
the public have one on which they can depend. Our 
space here does not admit certificates to show its effects 
But tbe trial of a single bottle will show to the sick that 
it has virtues surpassing anything they have ever taken. 
Sufferers from Scrofula, Scrofulous Swellings and Sores, 
try it and see the rapidity with which it cares, flkin 
Diseases, Pimples Pustules, Blotches, Eruptions, etc. , are 
soon cleaned out of the system. 

St. Anthony's Fire. Rose or Erysipelas, Tetter or Salt 
Rheum. Scald Haad, Ringworm, etc.. should not be bene 
while they can be so speedily cured by Area's Sabbata- 
biixa. 

Syphilis or Venereal Disease is expelled from tbe sys- 
tem by the prolonged use of this Sar&aparilla, and the 
patient is left as bealtby as if he never had tbe disease. 

Female Diseases are caused by Scrofula in tbo blood, 
and are generally sood cured by this Extract or Sajuu- 
pakiixa. Price tl per bottle, or 6 bottles lor ti 

For all tbe purposes of a family physic, take Arm's 
Catbabtic Pnxs, which arc everywhere known to be the 
best purgative that is offered to tbe American People. 

Prepared by Dr. J. C. Aver ft <jo. , I-owU, Mats., and 
sold by all Druggists and dealers Id medicine everywhere, 
CRANE \ BRIGHAM. San Francisco. 

Wholesale Agents. 



DEXTER STABLES, 
Bush Stveet, between Occidental and 
Cosmopolitan Hotels, San Francisco. 

W.'G.ftJONES. . Pboprixtob 



The Californian. 



15 



T 



HE CELEBRATED PIANOS 




J. B. DUNHAM, F. C. LIGHTE & CO., 
AND ERNEST GABLER, 

Are warranter! for FIVE TEARS and indorsed by the 
LEADING PIANISTS of AMERICA as SUPERIOR IN- 
STRUMENTS. 

Sole Age.vts— C WIEDERHOLD & CO , 

686 Market street, near Third. 



G 



REAT TRIUMPH 




STEINWAY & SONS 

Were awarded tlio FIRST PRIZE 
MEDAL at the lue (Treat 
INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION AT LONDON, over the 
wo hundred and sixty-nine Pianos entered for competition 
from all parts of the world. 

The Special Correspondent of the New York Times says : 

" Messrs. Steinway & Sons' indorsement by the Jurors 
is emphatic, and stronger and more to the point than that 
of any European maker." 

A constant supply of the above superior instruments can 
be found at the Agent's, 

M. GRAY, 613 Clay street. 
PIANO TUNING done by a first-class Workman, from 
Steinway & Sou's Factory, New York. 

CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

No. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

All kinds of Brass, 
Composition, Zinc , 
and Babbitt Meta 
Castings, furnished 
at the shortest notice. 
Brass Ship-Work oj 
all hinds, Spikes, 

Sheathing Nails, Rudder Braces. Hinges, etc. .constantly 
on hand and made to order. Also, manufacture Ship and 
Steamboat Bells aud Gongs o r superior tone. 

All kinds of Steam, Liquor, Water, Oil, and Flange 
C<icks and Valves made and repaired. 

Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and 
Connections of all sizes and patterns, furnished with dis- 
patch, prices; moderate. 

V. KINGWELL. JOS. H. WEED, SAM'L WHITS. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

Northeast corner Freraout and Mission streets, 
Manufacturers of 
MARINE AND STATIONARY ENGINES, 
Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Miuing 
Pumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

ALSO, 

"Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Presses of the latest 
Improved Patterns. 




STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand ; Quartz Mill Shoes and 
Dies warranted to be made of the best white iron. 
Dunbar's Improved Sell-Adjusting Piston-Packing, re- 
quires no springs or screws; is always steam-tight; with 
out excessive friction, and never gets slack or leakv. 

MACHINERY, OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 
Bought, sold, or exchanged. Bolt Cutting and Castings 
at the lowes t market rates. 

DEVOE, D1NSM0RE & C<\ 



P. COLE & CO., 

WHOLESALE 

Furniture Warehouse. 




No. 314: Pine street, San Francisco. 

LOWEST RATES AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK ON THE 
COAST. 

RETAIL STORE, 

Nos. 524 Market, and 21 Sntter streets — next door to 
the Metropolitan Market. 



JOHN HAGAN, 



Marble - Worker, 

MARKET ST , OPPOSITE LINCOLN SCHOOL 
HOU;E, between Fifth and Sixth. 

Marble MaLtels, Grates, Monuments, Hcad-tj^ 
stones. Cemetery Copings, and all kinds of ' " 
Marble Work executed on most reasonable' 

tcrm3. Particular attention paid to tho placing i 

of Tombstones at Lone Mountain or CalvaryQbjU@3 
Cemeteries. N. B. — Country orders promptly attended to. 




BOWMAN & CO., 
Dealers in Stoves and Tin Ware, 

Main street, Petaluma. 



Powell Street 

WARM SWIMMING BATHS! 
N. E. Comer Powell and Filbert Streets, 
OPPOSITE WASHINGTON SQUARE. 
J. M. NASH PROPRIETOR. 

WARM AND COLD BATHS from G .». M to 9 p. m. 
daily, W'th every appliance usually connected 
with a well-ordered Gymnasium for tho development 
of Health and Muscle. 

The only Complete Swimming Bath on 
this Coast. 

Another advantage connected with this establishment, 
not usually found in Swimming Baths, is, that ttie 
water is Continually Changing, Fresh Water running in 
and out Constantly. 

Single Baths, including Towels and Bathing Dress. 25 cts 
5 Bath Tickets, " " $1 

Call and Try Them. The Kearny Street and Mont- 
gomery Street Cars pass the door every Jive minutes. 

Tbo Baths are reserved for Ladies every Tuesday, 
from 6 A. M. to 9 F. M. Ladies to supply their own 
Bathing Dresses. 

I will guarantee to impart a thorough practical Icnowl- 
edge of Swimming in one month: Terms for the Course, $10. 

J. M. NASH. 



JACOB SHEW, 

Pioneer Photographer 

613 CLAY STREET. 
North side, four doors above Montgomery. 
Takes all kinds of Photographs in tho very best style 
of the Art. Would especially invite attention to the supe- 
riority ol the " Cabinet Photograph," or new size, taken 
at this establishment. 



pHOTOGRAPHY 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

Executed in a Superior Stylo, at 

GEO. D. MORSE'S 

NEW AND ELEGANT ROOMS, 

No. 315 Montgomery Street, corner of Summer. 

Photographs retouched in India Ink or Water Colors, 
and copied from daguerreotypes or ambroty pes lonny size. 
All work guaranteed and perfect satislaetion given. Call 
and see specimens before going elsewhere. 



J. 



C. E. KLEPZIG, 



MANUFACTURER f " 

DEALER IN f/^gS^csS 

GUNS, PISTOLS, ^ 

Sporting Apparatus, 

AMMUNITION 

AND GUN MATERIALS, 

No. 733 Washington Street, San Francisco. 
Gilding and Silver Plating or all Kinds of metals ; also, 
Silver or Plated Ware reburnished. 




JJOLBROOK, MERRILL k CO., 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

STOVES, TIN-PLATE, 

SHEET IRON, LEAD PIPE, PUMPS, ZINC, WIRE, AND 

HOUSE FURNISHING HARDWARE. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
TIN, SHEET-IRON AND COPPER WARE. 

Nos. 13 and 15 Front street San Francisco 

Nns. 176 and 178 J street Sacramento 

Main street Austin, Nevada 



R R I Y A L 

_OF— 

MADAME LAURDSTINUS, 

The Great Prophetess and Doctress. 
The Ma-lame has astonished thousands of her visitors in 
Europe, England and America, by revealing the Past, 
Present and Future Ev'nts of Lite, such as Law Suits, 
Travel by Sea or Land, Lost or Stolen Goods, Hidden Treas- 
ure, Absent Friends or Relatives, and all affairs of business 
in general. 

iS-Tho Madame has a select assortment of pure Roman 
Talismans, for Love, Good Luck, Success in Business, and 
guaranteed for Life. 

( fflee of MADAME LAURUSTINUS, No. 816 Montgomery 
street, between Jackson and Pacilic. Office hours, from 8 
o'clock in th cmorning until 8 in the evening. 



D 



R. N. T. WHITCOMB, 



BEN T 1ST, 
No. 205 Third Street, SaD Francisco. 



Teeth filled with fine gold, artificial bone and platina. 
All plate work made and repaired, of the best material, 
at tho shortest notice and warranted. None cheaper or 
better on the coast. Call and examine specimens. 

North Beach and South Park Cars pa^s the door. 

N. T. WHITCOMB. 



J^OCTOR DEMAREST'S 

Private Medical Office, 

617 KEARNY STREET, 

Near Commercial, San Francisco . 

Offics Hours : From 9i.ii., till 4 p. k. 



CALIFORNIA 

Steam Navigation Company. 

STEAMER CAPITAL CAPT.*E. A. POOLE. 

CHRYSOPOLIS.CAPT. A. POSTER. 

" YOSEMTTE 

" CORNELIA CAPT W. BROMLEY. 

" JULIA CAPT E. CONCKLIN 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF, 
at 4 o'clock P. M., EVERT DAY, (Sundays excepted,) for 
Sacramento and one for Stockton, ihe Sacramento steamer 
connecting with light-draft steamers for Marysville, Co- 
lasa.Cnico and Red Bluff. 

Steamships PACIFIC, ORIZABA, CALIFORNIA, AC- 
TIVE, and SENA '10R, leave as advertised, for Portland, 
Oregon, New Westminster, British Columbia, Victoria, 
(.V. I.,) Sauta Barbara, San Pedro, and San Diego. 

Office of the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets, 

B M. HARTSHORNE, President. 



jyjRS. WINSHIP, 

Fashionable Milliner 

NO. 23 POST STREET, 
Between Kearny and Montgomery, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



All kinds of Lace Work, Head Dresses, Breakfast Caps, 
&c, made to order. 

Particular attention paid to meuling and doing up 
Laces. 

tES„ Goods received by every steamer, from New York 
and Paris. 





JJEMOVAL.— F IRST PREMIUM 

Billiard 
TABLE 

MANUFACTORY. 

P. LISENFELD, 

Has removed from 612 Battery street to 537 Sacramento 
street, a few doors below Montgomery, 

Has constantly on hand a large assortment of the best 
BILLIARD TABLES, with all the modern improvements. 
Also BILLIARD TRIMMINGS of every description. 
All goods sold are warranted. 



AGENTS WANTED 
FOR 

Headley's Great Work ! 

The only book issued on our NAVY during tho Rebellion. 
Agents llud no competition. 

FARRAGUT AND OUR NAVAL COMMANDERS, 

Comprising Popular Biographies of our Naval Heroes, 
by Hon. J. T. Headley, the distinguished Author aud His- 
torian — complete in one large volume — handsomely illus- 
trated in steel. The best paying Agency of the day. 
In couneetiun with this work our Agents can take orders 
for five of Headley's Standard Works, Call or send f 
once lor Circulars and Terms. 

E. E. SHEAR, General Agent, 
No. 8 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



McDOUGALL & MARQUIS, 

Architects, 

328 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

IS. M'DOCGJILL. J. 1IABOI IS. 



Rkfebs to Messrs. Elam & Howes, Cliv stree t, In low 
Battery; Messrs. Hatch & Co., (R. W. Brungon 4; T. H. 
Hatch,) Washington street below Battery; A J Coglitll', 
Esq., Front street, corner of Clay; Wm. J. Adams, Ken , 
(Adams, Blinu &Co.,) Piers 17 and 19, Stewart sliest; Jo- 
seph Rich, Esq., Bush street below Turn vercin Hall, Hon. 
M. S. Latham, London and San Francisco Bank; Wm. B. 
Johnston, Esq., Insurance Building, 412 and 414 Montgom- 
ery street ; James Brooks, Esq. , Editor "Golden Era." 



Whiskers and Mustaches 



FORCED TO GROW UPON THE SMOOTHEST FACE 
face in from three to live weeks by using Dr. 
SEVIGNE'S RESTAURATEUR CAPILLA1 RE, the most 
wonderful discovery in modern science, upon the Beard 
and Hair in an almost miraculous manner. It lias been 
used by the elite of Paris and London with most nat- 
tering success. Names of all purchasers will be regis 
tered, and if entire satisfaction is not given in every 
instance, the money will be cheerfully refunded. Price 
by mail, sealed and post paid, $1. Descriptive circulars 
and testimonials mailed free. Address 

BERCEK, SHUTTS & CO., Chemists, 

No. 285 River street, Troy, N. Y., 
Sole Agents for the United States. 



HEALY'S CURATIVE OIL, 

For the Extermination of Pain, is a Sovereign Remedy 
for Rheumatism, Headache, Toothache, Sore Throat, 
Cramps in the Limbs, Diarrhoea, Sprains, Bruises, Bu< ns 
aud Cuts, ana for the Bites of Poisonous Insects, Frozen 
Feet, etc. , stands unrivalled. 

For Sale by all dealers in medicines. Price One Dollar 
per bottle. 



LOTS FOR SALE ON BERNAL RANCHO. 

NOTICE 13 GIVEN, THAT IN PURSUANCE OF AN 
Order of the Probate Court of the City and County 
of San Francisco, State of California,. the undersigned will 
sell at public auction, in two separate parcels, subject to 
confirmation by said Court, on TUESDAY, the 4th day of 
June, 1867, at 12 o'clock noon, at the auction rooms of 
MAURICE DORE&CO.,No. 327 Montgomery street, in 
said City and County, the real estate belonging to the 
Estate of CORNELIUS RICKTER, deceased, described as 
follows, to-wit: 

All those certain pieces or parcels of land situated, 
lying and being on the Bernal Rancho, in the City and 
County of San Francisco, aforesaid and known and desig- 
nated upon a certain map entitled, "Gift Map No. 3," as 
and by the numbers 269 and 271— being each 25 feet in 
width, in front and rear, and 70 feet deep. 

Terms of Sale— Cash, in United Slates Gold Coin. 
Deeds and Stamps at expense of purchaser. 

J. W. BRUMAGIM, 
Administrator of the Estate of Cornelius Rickter, deceased . 
Dated May 11th, 1867. myll-4w 



|N THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FIB'- 
X tccuth Judicial District ui th,- Mate of California, in 
and for the City and County ol San Francisco. 

EDWARD J. QUIRK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES P. HOR- 
BACH, el aft* , Deleudants 

Action brought m the District Court of the Fifteenth 
Junkial District of Ihe State ot California, in and fur the 
City and Oounty of San F.auuiscu, aud the complaint tiled 
in. the said city aud county of ism Fraucisco, in the office 
of the Clerk of said District Court. 

The People ot the Stale of Calilornia send greeting to 
JAMES P. HOUBACH, HENRY DELVENDAHL, HENRY 
BREMMERMAN, EKNsT JA^fcfcEN and GUSTAV HELM- 
KE, Deteudauls: 

You are hereby required to appear in an action brought 
against you by the above named Plaintiff, in tne District 
Court ut the Fifteenth Judicial District of the Stale of 
California, in aud for the city and county of San Fian- 
eieco,and to answer vhe complaint tiled therein, within 
ten days (exclusive of the day of service) after the serv- 
ice on you of tnis Summons— if served within this coun- 
ty ; or, if served out of this county, but in this 
District, within twenty days otherwise, within forty 
days— ot judgment by deiault will be taken against you, 
accordiug to the prayer of said Coiumuint. 

The said action is brought to lequireyou, the said de- 
fendants, to set Forth the nature of your respective claims 
to that certain lot or parcel oi laud situate in said city and 
county of San Francisco, as particularly described iu the 
complaint herein, being subdivision No. 5 of the 10U vara 
lot known on the map of the city of San Fraucisco as No. 
276, as designated ou a plat of the original subdivision 
thereof, recorded in the office of the County Recorder of 
said city and County , in Liber 1 of Certified Grants, at page 
156, that all adverse claims of said defendants and each of 
them may be determined by a decree of this Court; that by 
said decree it be declared and adjudged that the said de- 
fendants, each and all of them, have no estate or interest 
whatever in or to said parcel of laud, and that the title of 
piaiutill thereto is good and valid : that said defendants, 
and each of them , be forever debarred from asserting any 
claim whatever in and to said laud adverse to plaintiff, and 
for such other and further relief as to this Hon. Court shall 
seem meet and agreeable to equity, with costs of su;t 
against such of the defendants as shall defend this action. 

And you are hereby notified that if you fail to appear 
and answer the said complaint, as above required, 
the said plaintilf will apply to the Court for the relief 
demanded in said cumplaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the District Cour t 
of the Fiiteenth Judicial District of the State of Califor- 
nia, in and for the city and county of San Francisco, this 
25th day of February, iu the year of our Lord one thous- 
and eight hundred and sixty -sewn. 

WM. LOEWY, Clerk, 

[seal.1 By Octavius Bell, Deputy Clerk. 

Shit. Rev. Stamp, canceled. 50 cts. 

Tuos. B. Bishop, Plaintiff's Attorney. mh30-13w 



TN THE DISTRICT COURT of the FOURTH 

JL Judicial District of the State of California, in and lor 
the City and County of San Francisco. 

SIEGMUND T. MEYER and ASHER T. MEYER, plain- 
tills, vs. LIN A A. SON, Defendant. 

Actiou brought iu the District Court of the Fourth 
Juaiciai District of the State of California, in and lor the 
City and County of San Fraucisco, and the complaint tiled 
in the said City and County ol San Francisco, in tne office 
of the Clerk of said District Court. 

The People of the State of California send greeting to 
L I N A A. SON, Defendant : You are hereby required 
lo appear in an action brought against you by the above 
named plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Ju- 
dicial District of the State of California, in and for the 
City and County of San Francisco, and to answer the 
complaint filed therein, (a copy of which accompanies this 
summons) within ten diys (exclusive of the day of ser- 
vice) after the service on you of this summons — it served 
within this county ; or, if served out of this county, but 
iu this district, within tweuty days ; otherwise, within 
lorty days— or judgment by deiault will be taken against 
you, according to the prayer Of said complaint. 

'1 he said actiou is brought to recover the sum of two 
thousand nine hundred and nincty-'ine and 85-100 dollars, 
alleged to be due from you to the plaintifi'son a judgment 
recovered by said plamtitls against you, and nior« particu- 
acly described in the complaint herein, together with 
co-is ot suit. 

Aud you are hereby notified, that if you fail to appear 
itni answer the said complaint, as above required, the 
said plaintiffs w ill take judgment against you for said sum 
and costs of suit. 

G vet, under my hand and the seal of the District Court of 
the Fourth Judicial District of the State of California, 
in ■■■id for the City aud County of San Fraucisco, this 
ui.i. tecum day of February, in the year of our Lord one 
thuusand eight hundred and sixty-seven 

WM. LOEWY, Clerk. 
By Jas. E. Ashcom, Deputy Clerk. 

[SEAL, AND INTERNAL REVENUE STAMP CANCELED .J ruh2-3m 



IN THE PROBATE COURT of the City and t'oun y of 
San Francisco, State of California. 
Iu the matter of the Estate of DANIEL B. BARNES, 

deceased. 

Order to show cause why order of distribution should 
not be made. 

On reading and filing the petition of Stephen Smith, 
Administrator ol the Estate of Daniel B. Barnes, 
deceased, settiDg forth that he has filed his final account 
of his administration of the estate of said deceased, in 
this Court, and that the same has been duly settled and 
allowed; that all the debts and expenses of administration 
have been duly paid; and that a portion of said estate 
remains tobedivid d among the heirs of said deceased, 
and praying among other things for an order of distri- 
bution ot the lesiduo of said estate among the entitled: 

It is Ordered, that ail persons interested iu the estate 
of the said deceased, be and appear before the 
Probate Court uf the city and county of San Fran- 
cisco, at the Court Room of said Court, in the City Hall in 
said city and county, on MONDAY, the third day of 
June, A. D. 1867, at eleven o'clock, a. m., then and there 
to show cause why an order of distribution should not bo 
made of the residue of said estate among the heirs of 
said deceased, according to law. 

It is further Ordered, that a copy of this order be pub- 
lished for four successive weeks, before the said third 
day of June A D. 1867, in The Califob.nian, a news 
paper printed and published in the said city and county. 

M C. BLAKE, Probate Judge. 

Dated May 3d, A. D. 1867 my4-5tl3 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. — Estate of CLAUDE JAC- 
QUIN, deceased. 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, William 
Rowan, Administrator oi the estate of said deceased, to 
the creditors of, and all per&ons having claims against 
the said deceased, to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers, within ten months alter the fin-t publication 
ol tliis notice, to the sail Will. am Rowan, at No 532 
Merchant street, Room No. 3, in the City and County 
of San Francisco. 

WM. ROWAN. 
Administrator of tho estate of Claude Jacquin, deceased! 
Dutd at San Francisco, April 2tith, 1867. my4-6w 



NOTICE TO CREDIT OKS. — ESTATE OF HENRY 
SEAMAN, d<e. a e Notice is hereby given by the 
undersigued, Adu inteti i.ti a ot the above named estate, 
to the creditors if. and a'l persons having claims 
against the s ii deceased, t- exhibit the same with 
the necessary vt u< 1 e «. witem ten mouths after the first 
publication of this uptic<-, to the undersigned, at the 
office of D. P. Barsii w. aVq., No. 6 Montgomery Block, 
iu the city and count v ul ran Francisco. 

JANE SEAMAN, 
Administratrix "f the Estuloof Henry Seaman, deceased. 
May I0hh,1807. myll-6w 



The Californian. 



16 



M 



AGUIRE'S OPERA HOUSE. 



Thomas Maguibe Sole Proprietor 

Cahs. T.bbltts, Business Meager 

C. L. Gbaves Stage Manager 



Wm- Stevenson, 



. .Treasurer 



GRAND COMBINATION 

....OF 

DRAMATIC AND BALLET COMPANIES. 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING. . . .JUNE 1st, 
Will be presented the Gorgeous Spectacle of 

THE ELVES! 

Sylvia the Statue Bride Miss Sallie Hinckley 

Prince Lubiu Jockey Club Mrs. SopMe Kdwin 

E 0 f iue Alicia Mauueville Tborue 

Puillis""*"'."..' Mrs. C. R. Siunuers 

Count Coiusueam W. Barry 

Blaziui, a demon A. Lehman 

FAIRY BALLETS AND GRACEFUL DIVERTISEMENTS, 
By Mesdames Mirzetti, Mallveu, Schmidt. Lehman, and 
the Large and Beautiful Corps de Ballet. 

— ALSO— 

The celebrated 

MARTINETTI TROUPE, 

In their Wonderful and Daring Feats of Strength. 
Grace aud Agility. 

£3" New and Beautiful Tableaux, Gorgeous Scenery 
and Mechanism 1 

PBICES OF 'DM1SSION: 

Dress Circle $1 00 I Orchestra tl 00 

Parquette 50 | Upper Circle 25 



M 



AGUIRE'S ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 



Thomas MAcrai Proprietor 

Charles Tibbetts Business Manager 

ITALIAN OPERA. 

LAST NIGHT OF THE SEASON, 

SATURDAY EVENING JUNE 1st, 

Will be presented Verdi's Opera of 

UN BALLO EN MASCHERA. 

Amelia Signorina Elvira Brambilla 

O-car Signorina Eugenia Belliui 

Ulrica Madame Stella Bonheur 

Richard Signor G. Limbi-rti 

Reinhurt ' Signer G. Mancusi 

Samuel Mnns. Roncovieri 

T>m lions. Charl'-s 

Sylvan Mods. Schwigardi 

The Second Artillery Baud has been engaged. 

Conductor MR. GEO. T. EVANS. 



M 



ETROPOLITAN THEATRE. 



Harry Leslie Stage Manager. 

Great success of the Distinguished ETHEOPIAN 
COMEDIANS, 

MESSRS. LESLIE AND RAYNOR, 

Late Members of the World-Renowned 

" Christy's Minstrels," 

Who will be assisted by a distinguished array of 
MINSTREL TALE VT, and will give a short series of 
Refined Entertainments in 

American Minstrelsy and Burlesque Opera. 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING JUNE 1st, 

A Brilliant Interlude, intn ducing the famous Stump 
Speech, Japanese Fiddle, Stocks Up and Down, and the 
Great Stiadow Pantomime. 

The wonderful ZAMelLLAEROSTATION, the most 
wonderful Burlesque ever witnessed. 
To conclude with the laughable sketch entitled 
THE RHINOSEROSOUS. 
MONDAY EVENING, 
First night of 

BURLESQUE OPERA MARITANA, 

And the engagement ot 

HENRI HERBERTE & MISS JULIA GOULD, 

Who have been engaged to give due efrect to the series 
of Christy's Burlesque Operas about to be produced. 

THE CENTRAL PARK OF THE PACIFIC. 
-yyOODWARD'S GARDENS, 

Art Gallery, 
Museum, Gymnasium 

AND 

ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. 

THESE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS ARE VISITED DAILY 
by hundreds of the plea-nre seeking public, and 
all agree in pronouncing them the best and only first 
class suburban report on the Pacific coast. 

The extensive grounds are covered with the rarest 
trees and shr-ibbery, making it a most desirable spot 
for small parties wishing to enjoy a Pic-Nic. 
New attractions are being constantly added. 
These Gardens are accessible by the Howard, Market 
and Folsom street cars. Entrances on Mission and 
Valencia streets, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth. 
OPEN EVERY DAY. 

Admission 25 cents. Children under 12 years, half 
price. 





w 



ONDERS OF WONDERS 1 . 

TO BE SEEN ONLY AT THE 

acific Museum of Anatomy and Science, 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 

between Call^ rnla and Pine. 



jyj AGUIRE'S ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 

Thomas Magcire Sole Proprietor 

Charles Tihuhtts Business Manager 

Engagement for Six Nights Only 

OF THE WONDERFUL 

MIKADO JAPANESE TROUPE, 

17 MALE AND FEMALE ARTISTS, 
Under the management of J. R. MARSHALL, will 
appear on 

MONDAY EVENING JUNE 3d, 

For a few evenings, previous to the departure of 
the P. M. Steamship, in a scries of NOVEL, BRILLIANT, 
HUMEROUS and SENSATIONAL FEATS, peculiarly 
Japanese, such as Slack Rope Performances, Tub Bal- 
ancing, Walking a Ladder of Swords, Top Spinning, Con- 
juring, Perche, Paper Ladder Act, Bending, Magic Screen 
and Ladder, aud Performing Birds. 

The feats of Balancing, with the Tubs, Ladders. Bam- 
boos, Screens, and Boat by the Artist YOSHIGREROO, 
the Yeddo Hercules, assisted by his Family of Males and 
Females, are astonishing and picturesque. 

TOROONOiKI, the Blondin of Japan, among other 
feats, will construct a Ladder of Paper, in presence of the 
audieace, ascend it, and execute a most thrilling perform- 
ance, walk with Clogs on a Swinging Bamboo, twenty 
feet long, suspended in the air, ascend a Slack Rope from 
the floor of the stage to the gallery, making his descent in 
a most daring and artistic style. 

TZENAGEEROO performs the most ineredibie feat of 
walking a Ladder of Swords, edge uppermost, bare- 
footed. 

The remainder or the Troupe will be found equally in- 
teresting, aDd capable in their different acts, too numer- 
ous 1o mention. 

They are acknowledged to bo the most efficient and ac- 
complished Troupe of the kind in Japan, and will make 
every endeavor to wirj the good opinion of the people of 
America during their few months sojourn. 

Dress Circle One Dollar 

Family Circle Fifty Cents 

Gallery Twenty-five Cents 

Box Office open from 10 to 1 o'clock. Doors open at 7 
o'clock ; Performance commences at 8 o'clock. 



CENTRAL FAY CLUB. 

rpiIE ROOMS OF THE CENTRAL PAY 

Club, No. 1, 5 and 6, southeast corner of Pino aDd 
Montgomery streets. Special meeting every TUESDAY 
EVENING. Rooms open every evening for general 
consultation. 



M. KELLER, 

PROPRIETOR OF THE 
RISING SUN AND LOS ANGELES VINEYARDS. 

DEPOT FOR THE SALE OF HIS 
NATIVE WINES AND BRANDIES, 

Wine and Brandy Bitters, 
BASEMENT OP MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 
Corner of Battery and Washington Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



G. GROEZINGER, 

DEALER IN 

Native California 

RED AND WHITE WINES, 
Brandies, Port, Sherry, Angelica, Etc., 

N. W. CORNER OF BATTERY AND PINE STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Erin Go Bragh 




HIRE R N I A 
Smoking Tobacco, 

UNEQUALLED BY ANY IN THE MARKET. 

B. C. HORN & CO., 

FRONT STREET, CORNER OF CLAY, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



CUTBERLET, 
CUSTOM 
BOOT AND SHOE STORE, 

— ALSO— 

FRENCH SCREWED BOOTS AND SHOES, 
No. 546 Washington Street, near Montgomery Street 



The Finest quality of CUSTOM WORK neatly executed. 
Always on hand other fine work ready made. 



J)RT GOODS 



.AT. 



Reduced Prices. 

ME AG EER, TAAFFE & CO., 

ARE OFFERING 

At Their Retail Store 



Large Lines of the Following Described 
Goods, all of which are of 



SUPERIOR QUALITY 

AND WILL BE SOLD FROM 

20 to 40 Per Cent. 

LESS THAN COST OF IMPORTATION. 



50 Pieces Good Black Dress Silk at §1 
aud $1 25. 

30 Pieces Good Black Dress Silk at $1 50, 
$1 75 and $2. 

40 Pieces Biscoff s Super Black Dress Silks, 
$2 25, $2 50, $2 75, and «3. 

100 Pieces Bounets Extra Super from §2 50 
to $8. 

500 Dresses Rich Brocade, Striped, Plain, 
and Chine Silks, for Walking, Carriage 
and Bridal Dresses. 

200 Pieces Rich, Plain Colored Silk. 

500 Pieces Plain and Chine Poplins for 
Walking and Traveling Suits. 

Merinos, Empress, and Ottoman Cloths. 

Alpaccas, Mohairs, Prints, Ginghams. 

MOURNING DRESS GOODS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Linen Sheetings and Shirtings, Table Dam- 
asks, Table Cloths, Napkins, Towels 
and Toweling. 

Cotton Shirting and SheetiDgs, French Cam- 
brics, Nainsook, Jackonets, Mull, Swiss 
and Organdie, for ladies and children's 
dresses ; Marseilles, etc., etc. 

Blankets, Quilts, Flannels. 

Cloth, suitable for Cloaks and Men aDd 

Boys' woar. 

LACES AND EMBROIDERIES. 
Hoisery, for Ladies, Gentlemen and Children. 
Cloaks and Shawls, in the Latest Styles. 
Kid Gloves, Handkerchiefs, etc. 
MEAGHER, TAAFFE & CO., 

9 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

UNDER LICK HOUSE. 



Great Reduction in Rates. 

QPPOSITION TO NEW YORK 
EVERY TWENTY DAYS! 

Carrying the United States Mail via Nicaragua ! 
THE OPPOSITION STEAMER 

AMERICA, 

2500 Tons EDGAR WAKEMAN, Commander, 

Will sail for SAN JUAN DEL -ITR, Nicaragua, from 
MIS-TON STREET WHARF , at 11 o'c.ock, A. M ,on 

WEDNESDAY, - - JUNE 5<A, 1867, 

Connecting at Grevtown with the mngnificcnt Steamship 
SANTIAGO, 2,S00*tons. for NEW YORK. 

t3fc,Tbe MOSES TAYLOR will sail June 25th. 

For further information, applv to 

I. W. RAYMOND, Agent, 

Northwest corner Battery and Pine street*, up sUirs. 



.Newly Opened. 



s 



TOCKDaLE house, 

Corner Main and Oak streets, Petaluma' 

S. 3TOCKDALE Proprietor 




McKee's 

NEW GROCERY 

AND 

FAMILY FURNISHING 

Store, 



No. 31 KEARNY STREET, 
Third Door Sonth of Post Street, 

NOW RECEIVING ORDERS FOR GROCERIES, BRO- 
visions. Table Luxuries, and aU Housekeeping 
a tides of the beat quality at low prices. 



50 0,0 00 CIGARS 
At $5 per Thousand, 

FOR SALE BY 

B. C. HORN & CO., 

FRONT STREET, CORNER OP CLAY, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



o o 

TRY IT! 

• STANDARD SOAPCO.'S : 

• WASHING POWDER. 

: It saves one-half the lime and : 

; labor of ordinary Soaps. DO'-'S : 

: not injure Ihe Clothing. Get a : 

: package and give it a trial. So d : 
: by all Grocers. 



O- 



•o 



PRO BONO PUBLICO. 

LACOUR'S 

SARSA PARIPHERE 
BITTERS 

POSSESS INVALUABLE PROPERTIES. 
They give Health to the Sick, 

Strength to the Weak, 

Joy to the Afflicted, 
SOLD EVERYWHERE 



There cometh glad tidings of joy to all, 

To young and old, to great and to small; 

The beauty which was once - precious and rare, 

Is free lor all, and all may be fair. 

By the use of 

CH ASTELL AR'S 
WHITE LIQUID ENAMEL, 

I^OR IMPROVING AND BEAUTIFYING THE COM. 
' plexion. 

The most valuable and perfect preparation fn use, for 
giving the skin a beautiful pearl-like tint, that is only 
found in youth, 't quickly removes Tan, Freckles, 
Pimples, Blotches, Moth Patches, Sallowness. Eruptions, 
and all impurities of the skin, kindly healing the same, 
leaving the skin white and clear as alaba ter. Its use 
cannot be detected by the closest crutiny, and being a 
vegetable preparation is perfectly harmless. It is tbe 
only article oi the kind used by the French, and is con- 
sidered by the Parisian as indispensable to a perfect 
toilet. UpwardB of 3b,uO0 bottle- were sold dur ng the 
past year, a sutile ent guarantee of its efltcacy. Price 
only 75 cente. Sent by mail, post-paid, on receipt of 
order, by 

BERGEft, 8HUTTS & CO , Chemist*. 

285 River street, Troy, N. Y; 



excelsior ! Excelsior ! ! 

Cn ASTELL AR'S 

(HAIR EXERMINATOR, FOR REMOVING 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR. 

TO THE LADIES ESPECIALLY, THIS INVALUABLE 
dei tlatory recommend* itself as being an almost 
indispensable article to lemale beauty, is easily applied, 
does not burn or injure the skin, but acts directly on 
tbe roots. It is warranted to remove superfluous hair 
from low foreheads, or from any tart ol the body, 
completely, totally and radically extirpating tbe same, 
leaving tbe skin soft, smooth and natural This Is the 
only article used by tbe French, and Is the only real 
effectual depilatory in exi-tenee. Price 15 cents per 
package, sent lost-paid, to any address, on receipt of 
an order by 

BERGER. SHUTTS ft CO. , Chemists, 

286 River street, Troy, N. Y. 



THEODORE K ALLEN BERG, 

No. 416 Market street, - - - San Francisco, 

Machinist, 

Maker of Models for Inventor?, Drawing Instruments, 
Small Machines, Philosophical Instrument*, Scales and 
Weights, all kinds of Braes and Iron Work- 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 





A VEIN ^y^fCXm _> 



VOLUME VII., No. 3. 
Office, No. 532 Merchant street. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 8, 1867. 



tttwiuq 5 $5 a Year, by Mail, in Advanck 
1L ™ 8 ')50 Cents a Month, by Carrier 



CONTENTS: 

Original : The Prospects of tlie Church of Rome ; Glimpses of 
Bohemia, by an Old Stager ; Street Car Reflections, by Prentice ; 
The Alumui Celebration; Literary Gleanings; Tennysoniana : Ed- 
mund Yates' Harriet Routh ; "Lion's Mouth:" The Sun Francisco 
Wind ; Letters from the People ; The Primary Election ; Dramatic 
Affairs; Paragraphs; Poetry, etc. Selected: The Three Pellets of 
Bread, a French story; Fenian Facts, an Irish sketch; Engine 
Drivers and Their Ways ; The Bowery Theater, etc. 



THE LION'S MOUTH. 

" Tun gravest beast I? an ass. We gmVesi bird is an owl, the gravest fish 
: is an oyBter,au I the gravest mau is a fool." EWMH Smith. 

" I will roar, that I will uo auy man's heart good to hear inc." 

A MlDSVMMEIt NIGHT'S Dbl-ah. 

"I w»LL»ggravate my voice so, that I will roar yon as gently as any suck- 
ing dove; I will roar you an "t wore any nightingale. " Imp, 
" JfU /aUi audeat, nil vcri mm aiulait dicere." ClCEBO. 



The San Francisco Wind. 

The wind has received much attention from poets, sailors and mill- 
ers. Modified and mitigated winds are termed breezes and zephyrs. 
They are very pleasant, save when laden as they are at times with 
perfumery overdone. The most villainous in the world is the Sap 
Francisco wind. Very angry, and irritable is this species of wind. 
It always gets up about noon in a dreadful stato of temper. It tack- 
les everything, like a young housekeeper who lias so much to do that 
she knows not what to take liold of first. So she goes rampaging and 
charging aronnd, sweeping a bit here, and dusting a bit there, and 
Tnshing out into the kitchen to see the coflee boil over, and rushing 
back to answer some vexatious mutch-peddler's knock at the front 
door, scolding everyoue who comes in her way. Something in this 
manner does the San Francisco wind handle men and women, being 
ne respecter of persons. It chucks great armfnlsof dust in yo^r eyes, 
and then it follows up the dust attack with clouds of sand. I have 
seen it bundle a respectable woman on the corner of Market and 
Third, where it descends from above perpendicularly and blows seven 
different ways at once. I have seen it handie such a woman as if it 
considered that woman a carpet which needed shaking. I looked to 
tee that woman go up heavenward, but 6he did not because she- had 
set her head against going in that direction just then, and when a 
woman sets berhead against anything it is hard eveu for a San Fran- 
cisco wind to oppose her. 

The San Francisco wind takes a malicious pleasure in blowing your 
bat off, if it be a new one, and then rolling it tuntulizingly ahead of 
you in the dirtiest places it can select. It niauUes'.s great judgment in 
picking out dirty places. 

The San Francisco wind is responsible for a vast amount of bad 
temper. On the few calm days with which we are favored during 
the windy season, people who have to walk home arrive there in a ter- 
rible humor, but the rest of the time they are so heat and banged 
about by the airy tempest as to work them into such an intensified 
state of Dervous irritability that the afflicted persons are fit to commit 
murder or any other crime for which they have a liking, immediately 
on crossing the family threshold. 

The San Francisco wind is the meanest wind a poor man can breathe 
or exist in, not so much on account of his lungs, as his clothes when 
they are of black broadcloth and he is unable to buy more than one 
suit a yeur. It rains down seediuesB on impoverished humanity. 

Letters from tttc People. 
Tbe'Cal! has of late very properly devoted a portion of it« space to 
" letters from the people." The people avail themselves of this op 
portunity to rush into print. " Pater Fumilias " informs the Call and 
the public generally that bis wife bought some salmou of a fish-ped- 
dler, paid for two pounds, and on weighing it found she had onlv re- 
ceived twenty-two ouoces. We know that "Pater Familias;" he's 
a regular tradesman who keeps a store— perhaps he is a fish monger — 
and he is continually writing to the Call under various names, and 
warning people against patronizing peddlers. Then " Pamela Brown" 
complains bitterly that a nail iu the sidewalk tore her dress. She 
says : 

" I am a poor, hard-working girl, away from my parents, who re 
side a long way from here, and, owing to the objection above alluded 
to, have been a sufferer ; for, on going to the Post Office to Inquire for 
letters, last week, and the boards of the footway being so very loose, 
sprung up and a projected nail, or a portion of the board, catching my 
dress, tore it to such an exter* us to cause me considerable time and 
expense to repair, which I cau ill aflord. Please call the attention of 
the authorities to this nuisance, and oblige your very humble servant.'' 

Now we mnst euy that the Call was very good natnred to oblige 
poor Pamela Brown, a hard-working girl, away frun her parents, 
who reside a long way from here, by allowing her to tell the public 
how she tore her dress. It was a little rough on Pamela, we own, as 
had her parents not been a long way from here, she might have got 
her mother to mend her dress for her instead of sewing up the rent 
herself. However, if "the authorities" have hammered down that 
projected nail in consequence of Pamela Brown's letter to the Call, 
then, indeed, has that paper been of public service. We alwavs con- 
sidered the Call a useful little paper. 



Seriously Concerned. 

The Spirit of Ike Times and Fireman's Journal has broken ont in 
a fresh spot Directly below a spoiling item, containing the valuable 
information that a gentleman of Los Angeles " claims the name of 
Col. Lathrop for a eh. colt foaled March 1G, 1867, one white hind-foot 
and small white spot in the face, sired by Fireman, dam old Lena, by 
Grey Eagle out of a Picket mare." Just below this bit of sporting in- 
telligence, is an " article " concerning the issue in the Episcopnl 
Church of this diocese, between the friends of the Rev. Mr. Eagan on 
the one hand, and the Bishop and the regularly constituted church au- 
thorities on the other. As the question is a very serious and compli 
rated one, involving points of ecclesiastical law and usage in said 
Episcopal Church, besides sundry disputed matters of fact, the delib- 
erate opinion of the editor of Ihe Fireman's Journal and Spirit of th' 
Times, as a gentleman thoroughly posted in " listiana,'' the "turf," 
dog-fights, and the capacity of thorongh-bred rut-and-tau terriers for 
dispatching a given number of rats in a given number of minutes, must 
be of inestimable value to the religious world — scarcely less so indeed, 
than the theological views of the learned editors of the flash Sunday 
papers Little sins against the canons of grammar and rhetoric, are to 
he looked for in Spoiling organs, and seem to be rather appropriate US 
them than otherwise; therefore the weight of the Spirit's verdict 
ought not to be estimated by the quality of the language iu which it is 
expressed. Here it is : 

" We look upon this whole ulT.iir, from its inception to its close, as 
post disgraceful to the Church and productive of no good whatever. 
* * * To be so near the Almighty as the Bishop of the Church is 
supposed to he, he is farther removed from the people, for whom the 
Sou of God died to save, than auy Prelate of the Episcopal Church we 
ever heard of. 

This is very severe on Bishop Kip, and we are sincerely sorry for 
lmu. He is remorselessly set down as the worst perlate with whom 
the editor of the Fireman's Journal ever had any intimate, personal 
acquaintance, and aj the number of said prelates must be presumed to 
be very large, the case of our Bishop is truly deplorable. 

The Primary Election. 

We strolled around last Wednesday to look at the first legalized pri 
mary elections held in this city. People interested in saving the 
country, say that legalized primaries are a good thing. To us it seems 
a still further complication of the elective machinery, necessitating, 
perhaps, in a fewyeara the establishment and legalization of ante- 
primary eleciione to elect somebody or something to the primaries. 
Politics is certain.] v getting to be a very difficult and complicated study. 
To be a good cilizen. and a properly developed voter, you miiBt get 
registered, you must attend all the preparatory meetings, you must read 
various political newspapers, you must keep on good terms with two 
or three professional politicians to keep posted, and you must be able, 
when duty calls, to drink had whisky. It is a hard and laborious oc- 
cupation. Many of the men we saw on Wednesday, about those pri- 
maries, looked us if their patriotic eallimfhad told heavily upon their 
constitutions. The concentration of the mingled odor of tobacco, 
whisky, Democrats and Republicans at the polling places was im- 
mense. Thank Heaven there arebo many willing to relieve us of our 
share of the burthen of saviug the country and holding office. 

Sound and Sense. 

The lady who advertises iu the following manner iu a daily paper 
should have availed herself of the services of some one who knew 
how to write English : 

" WANTED — Every father and mother in San Frar.cisco wishing 
their sons or daughters to plav music well, read well, sing well and 
articulate song words distmcflv, feelingly and beautifully, are re- 
quested to call and see Mrs. S. J. C , who will play, sing and read for 
you with pleasure.'' 

If Mrs. S. J. C, teaches her pupils to mangle words as she mangles 
the English language, she is a dangerous woman and should be 
avoided. If Mrs. S. J. C. is as little skilled in the grammar of music 
as she is in the grammar of the English language, then every father 
and mother who are requested to call on her will hear her play and 
sing tor. you. with anything but pleasure. Why does. not some one 
establish a bureau and write advertisements of all kinds in decent 
English for a moderate compensation 1 

The Power of Music. 
Some one says that music hath power to move the savage breast and 
make the wildest Indian tame. The Indians are at present very sav 
age. Would it not be well to try the power of music on them, attack 
them with music p-oduced from barrel organs instead of lead from 
rifle barrels. The power of music ou tho brute creation has been fully 
tested. An exchange, iu speaking of the magical strains of a hand 
orgau, says: When he played Old Dop Tray, we noticed 11 pups 
sitting in front of the machine on their haunches, brushing away the 
tears from their eyes with their fore paws." If II pups were thus 
subjected by Ihe strains of one hand-organ, what would he the effect 
of a thousand hand organB on the Indians? The inhabitants of the 
chief cities of the United States would gladly spare them for a month 
or two. 

Freight from Australia. 

A Mr. JobBon whorecently arrived from Australia, has brought with 
him a poem addressed to Washington, which he has submitted to the 
Board of Snpervi?ors for their approval. It Is not yet decided 
whether or not Mr. Shrader* will read, it on the coming Fourth of July. 



Unspeakably Delightful. 

A Washington correspondent of the Boston Transcript, tells a story 
about an Iudiana soldier who was buried hlive for two days and a 
half. Five coffins were piled on his coffin, and when he woke to con- 
sciousness on the third day, we are told that " his first feeling was a 
suffocating sensation." It is probable if he awoke that lie did feel 
rather suffocated. Then we are told he screamed, and the Bentinel 
guarding the tomb dropped his musket which went off. We give tho 
remainder of the story in the correspondent's own words I 

" Tlie report aroused Mr. M. still more to a sense of his condition aud 
awful location. He redoubled his screams, bringing a rush of soldiers 
to the tomb, who soon got him out and relieved him from his terrible 
confinement. He is conlidenthe should have suffocated in 15 minutes. 
He says that, though never conscious of his dreadful situation , his 
mind was always active, and his sensations unspeakably delightful — 
seeming to float through scenes of surpassing beauty, amid strains of 
delicious music, such, to use his owu words, as he has never heard 
since.'' 

Now mark how easily Ibis in famous correspondent is proved to be a 
story teller. Mr. M. was " aroused to a sense of his condition and aw- 
ful ' location,' " we are told. Then " he redoubled his screams." 
After this, we are informed that he was " never conscious of his dread 
'ill situation." If he was aroused to a souse of his " awful location " 
how is it that he was never conscious of his '• awful situation ?" As 
to his hearing strains of delicious music which he has never heard 
since, this is easily explained, if he has not been to the opera since 
his recovery. We cannot believe tha^ his sensations were unspeak- 
ably delightful when he had five coffiins on the top of his own pecu- 
liar coffin. If they were whv did he scream, and why did he 
redouble his screams ? This is just the sort of thing to encourage peo- 
nle to get themselves buried alive, and have five coffins piled on the 
top of them. We beg everyone to place no credence in this wicked 
prevaricator's story. 

Conscience. 

The California Farmer of Thursday, May 30th, publishes " Con 
science," b} - James Linen, with the following introduction : 

" [We are most happy to give our readers the following Gem of 
Poetry, from our gifted California Poet. James Linen, Esq. We know 
our reudf rs will justly appreciate it, aud acknowledge it to be truly a 
Gem in Poetry ] " 

"Conscience" in the Farmer of the above date, only amounts to 
about three quarters of afoot. Hal the Farmer a little more con 
science it would have duly credited the "poem " to The C>Lifor.NiAN, 
"or which paper it wasori 6 ?n';. ly written instead of simp.l- ) i traducing 
it to its bucolic readers as " a Gem in Poetry," and expressing its firm 
conviction that its readers would justly appreciate it and acknowledge 
it to be trnly " a Gem iu Poetry.'' Gemmy Linen's Gem in Poetry 
will, we trust, be fully appreciated ; but still, the editor of the Farmer 
ought not to have published it without credit. The poem commences : 
" Tell me, O Conscience ! what thou art, 
That fires the brain and wrings the heart ; 
That haunts the guilty mind with fears, 
And fills the bitter mind with tears." 
Ah, ah ! If the Farmer man has any conscience, his poor brain is 
pretty hot, his unfortunate heart is being wrung like a flannel petticoat 
in Maxton's patent clothes wringer, his guilty mind is pretty we!! 
haunted with fears, aud the aforesaid mind is just pickled in bitter 
tears. 

Police and Religion. 

We are informed by the Eastern press that a 3'oimg Methodist cler- 
gyman has preached from the steps of his church in Salisbury, N. H., 
all through the winter, the house having been closed against him soon 
after he was sent there. No one comes to hear him, but in Btorm or 
shine, he takes his position with uncovered head, and exhorts and 
pravs, and no expostulation or entreatv can turn him from what he 
deems his duty. We do not exactly understand why this young 
MethodiBt Clergyman should be considered an object of sympathy by 
the press. The unfortunate Mr. Crisis, who preached in this city 
with uncovered head, was first viilitied by the unscrupulous ritzj 
Smythe in the public prints, and afterwards arrested by the police. If 
that young Methodist clergyman were to preach anywhere within a 
block of the Attn office, in this city, he would not be expostulated 
with or entreated to desist; he would be lugged off to the calaboose, 
unless the policeman on the beat and Fitz Smythe and ihe majority of 
those who were passing by happened to be Methodists. We have a 
free cbmch in Sun Francisco, but we don't approve of religion being 
made too free. Busiuess is bUBiuess.und uo peddling without a license 
is tolerated. 

Our Mechanics. 

Our bosom swelled with patriotic pride as we contemplated the 
grand turn out of the workingmen of this city on Monday. They 
didn't looPnmch like the " down trodden masse-, of the effete mou- 
nt cbies of the Old World." Not a bit of it. They didn't look as if 
thev suffered much from short-raiions. and the displuy of Sunday dry- 
goods was most liberal. We don t believe that the people who do tho 
brain work, and labor from twelve to sixteen hours a day could turn 
out in as good store clothes, with white gloves, etc., or that they could 
brd to pav for so manv carriages and bands of music We heaved 



afforcl to pav iui n,. >ii 

a sigh as we contemplated these happy fellows, and groaned in spirit 
over the evil destiny that had consigned us to thedoomof a slaveol 
the lamp," iusteud of making us a working man. 

Literary Co-partnership. 

The Times eays that Alice Kingsbury intended to produce, before 
she left for Europe, several plays written for her by '• a lady and gen 
tiemun of this city," and regretted not being able to do so fhis is 
belter than the Beaumont and Hetcher partnership. Ah! How 
much the public of San Francisco lost in not having mtrodnced to >t 
the literary offspring of a lady and gentleman of this city ! 



2 



The Calitornian 



THE THREE PELLETS OF BREAD. 

THE FIRST PELLET. 

IN 1824, toward the end of October, ten young men were 
concluding a repast at one of the tables of the Cafe da 
Paris. The succulent dishes had been ppparently well sea- 
Boned with wine, for all their faces were illuminated, and all 
were talking at the same time. 

Nor was it surprising that the meeting had been a jovial 
one. The amphitryon — George Benier by name — only the 
other day sub-lieutenant in the 5th Regiment of Dragoons- 
had unexpectedly inherited a fortune estimated at six hundred 
thousand francs. Barely a month had elapsed since he had 
received, whilst serving in Spain, the news of the death of an 
uncle, who had left him heir to the accumulations of an indus- 
trious and well-spent life. He had obtained leave of ab- 
sence, and had hurried off to the capital to realize his for- 
tune. He had also invited what few friends — chiefly college 
chums — he had in Paris, to participate in his happiness. He 
had nine — in a day or two he would have fifty. A man with a 
well-lined pocket has always plenty of friends. 

The banquet held in honor of this sudden accession of funds 
was coming to a conclusion — that is to say, the party were at 
their last bottles of champagne. Awaiting coffee, everyone 
was laughing, talking, or gestulating, without concerning him- 
self about listening or being listened to. The host, who was 
more animated even than the others, probably because, in his 
quality of host, he had deemed it necessary to set a good ex- 
ample, was endeavoring to get a word in concerning his feats 
of valor in the Peninsula — expatiating upon the assault of the 
Trocadero on the 31st of August, 1823, and the delivery of 
Ferdinand YII. from the hands of the Cortes ; but everyone 
was too happy to listen to details. 

In the meantime, coffee had been brought in. The young 
man — George Benier was in his tweuty-first year — was lifting 
his cup to his lips, when he suddenly put it down again, with 
an exclamation of surprise and disgust. 

" Garcon !" he shouted, in a voice that made the whole es- 
tablisement start, " take this cup away at once." 

And, as he said this, he pointed to two flies that had been 
stupid enough to take a bath in the hot fluid — a bath which 
had cost them their lives. One of the garcons took away the 
cup, whilst another busied himself in repairing the disaster. 
The guests were laughing heartily at the discomfiture of the 
lieutenant of dragoons. 
" Ah ! ah !" said one, " George is afraid of a fly !" 
But, Prosper Dyonnet, a college chum, interposed — " Don't 
you remember? he used to kill them by huudreds ; his con- 
science troubles bim, and now the sight of two dead flies 
awakens his remorse." 

The interpellation excited renewed langhter, in which 
George joined heartily. 

" True, gentlemen," he said, " I always had a horror of flies, 
and I became so skillful by dint of practice in killing them 
with pellets of bread, that I got the surname of ' Tueur de 
mouches.' I have not lost my skill yet, I can tell you ; but if 
I assassinate flies, that is no reason why I should also swallow 
them." 

" Well said," observed one of the guests ; and with after- 
dinner thoughtlessness, and the love of fun natural to youth, 
he proposed that George should give them proof that he was 
still entitled to what he was pleased to designate as a glorious 
title to distinction. 

To this effect a roll of bread was taken from a table close 
by. George Benier, as serious as if he were about to solve a 
problem in mathematics, broke it, took out the crumbs, and 
began to prepare his ammunition. Having made three pellets, 
be held them out in his open hand. 

" Now," he said, " who'll bet that I don't kill a fly with 
each shot ?" 

" We'll all bet," shouted the guests. " What shall it be ? 
A monster punch I" 

" Good ; but what distance do you allow me ?" 

" We leave that to you — a pellet of bread is not precisely a 
conical ball." 

In the interval, a man, apparently above fifty years of age, 
with grey moustaches and coat buttoned up — evidently an old 
soldier — had come into the cafe. Ordering a cup of choco- 
late, he had taken up a newspaper, and was reading as he 
awaited his refreshment. The room was crowded with flies, 
half stupified by the approach of winter, and George Benier 
observed that three had settled upon the new comer — one on 
his arm, another on his neck, and a third had the impudence 
actually to alight on the very hand that held the paper. The 
guests watched the direction which George's eyes had taken, 
and the same malicious idea occurred at the same moment to 
all their excited brains. This idea was mutually exchanged by 
nods, and smiles, and intelligent glances, but not formulated 
iuto words. That would have spoilt the fun. George, en- 
couraged by these looks of approbation, made his preparations 
lor the commission of a grievous act of folly. 

Placing one of the pellets on his thumb, and holding it 
there by the medium finger curved into a bow, so as to act as 
a spring, be took aim at the right hand of the man with the 
grey moustaches. It must be said to his credit, however 



that he hesitated for a moment, a ray of sense flashed across 
his mind, and he turned around to look at his friends. But 
all he saw there was encouragement by nods, and winks, and 
smiles, It was such fun ! Alas ! how many foolish things 
are done under the absurd inpression that there is something 
funny in them! 

George's thumb went off ; the pellet was shot forth, and 
killed the fly that lay on the officer's hand. 

" Superb!" ejaculated his friends, but in subdued tones, not 
to interfere with the progress of their rich friend's experiment. 

As to the veteran, he never moved, but continued to read 
his paper as il nothing had happened. Encouraged by his 
success, and excited by the applause of his friends, a3 also by 
the attention of other spectators which bad been attracted to 
what was going on, George Benier took aim 'at the shoulder, 
and the second fly fell a victim to his skill. After this there 
was no receding. The man in the buttonedup coat persisted 
in ignoring the insults put upon his person ; there was only 
one fly more to kill to inaugurate the monster punch, and that 
fly was stretching out its fore feet not many inches below the 
formidable grey moustaches. Off went the third pellet, and 
the intrusive insect fell dead. The experiment concluded, 
there was no longer any cause for silence, and alt the guests 
united in shouting " Vive le Tueur de mouches !" 

But whilst they were thus jubilant and triumphant, the man 
in the buttoned up coat had slowly risen, and sloopiug, he de- 
liberately picked up the three pellets of bread, which done, he 
walked over, quite calmly, to where George sat with his friends. 
The laughter now suddeuly ceased, aud the attention of the 
other spectators became breathless. Strangers, as well as the 
friends of the " Tueur de mousches," kuew that matters could 
not stop there. A pin might have been heard to tail in the 
whole cafe. 

The man with the grey moustrches saluted the company. 
The salutation was respectfully returned by George and his 
guests. George was p little pale, but calm. The veteran, ex- 
tended his hand, in the palm of which were the three pellets 
of bread, was about to speak. But George, who would not 
allow, even for half a second, that it should be supposed that 
he would leave the responsibility on anyone but himself, an- 
ticipated him. 

" It was I sir; I shot those pellets." 

The unknown bowed again. 

" That is sufficient, sir." 

So saying, he quietly uubu'.toned his coat, and drew forth a 
card from his waistcoat pocket. 

"Monsieur," he said, " will be good enough to show me 
that he is as skillful with a sword as he is with a pellet of 
bread t" 

" At your orders, sir," replied George, as he exchanged 
cards with his adversary. 

Upon the stranger's card was graven : " Louis Rodet, ex- 
Captain of Light Infantry." 

Next morning at ten the yonng soldier of the Trocadero 
and the veteran of Austerlitz and of Wagram met, accom- 
panied each by two friends, in the Bois de Boulogne. George 
was a proficient in sword exercise, but by no means as much 
so as the captain. After a lew passes he had to give up the 
combat, his right arm being pierced through and through. As 
the veterau left the field, he saluted his wounded aud discom- 
fited antagonist with great courtesy : 

"Till we have the pleasure of meeting again, sir," he said. 

" Vou are really too kind," retorted George Benier. 

And following the old soldier with his eyes as he took his 
departure, accompanied by two veterans of his own stamp. 

'• Ah ca I" he muttered, " what does that animal mean with 
his ' pleasure of meeting me again?' Does he not think one 
lesson of politeness sufficient ? The idea is any thing but re- 
assuriug 1" 

George Benier had to keep his bed for two months. His 
wound was severe, and he had to observe complete repose. 
After these two months, a third was enjoined in his room for 

convalescence. 

•' It was well worth while," he said to himself, " to hurry 
from Spain to claim my inheritance, and to have to spend 
three months in suffering and tedium !" 

But at length he was free, and happy in being able to walk, 
eat, run, and laugh like everybody else. Prosper Dyonnet re- 
mained his boon companion, although he entertained a slight 
grudge toward him for his folly in resuscitating 11 is talents as 
a collegian in so inopportune a manner. But he remembered 
also that Prosper had had a few glasses of champagne too 
many, and he forg.ive him. Prosper, besides, knew Paris in- 
timately, aud not only assisted him in procuring a carriage and 
horses, but also introduced him to the world. 

THE SECOND PELLET. 

During the carnival of 1825, George Benier made the ac- 
quaintance, at an opera ball, of a lady who was much sought 
after at that period, and who wa3 known as the Baroness of 
Belmonte. We say known, for she was no more a baroness 
than her mother, who sold artichokes in winter and oranges 
in summer. Despite her humble origin, the baroness, however, 
was clever, aud she managed to captivate the young man. 



He could not sleep at night, and spent the day in deploring to 
his Prosper Dyonnet the cruelty of the fair one. Not that 
the baroness objected to the young man's attentions, but she 
knew her interests too well to succumb at ouce. Three weeks 
had passed in walks and drives, the lady had accepted both 
cashmeres and diamonds, but as yet had given no signs of a 
riciprocal affection. George began to weary of laying siege to 
so impregnable a place. Scenes of recrimination occurred, till 
the lady, fearing she might lose her lover, showed more symp- 
toms of relenting. 

George was walking arm-in-arm with his friend Prosper on 
the Boulevards. He was in high spirits ; visions of happiness 
were before him which he did not fail to confide to his bosom 
friend, and they agreed to celebrate the happy torn in events 
by a repast at the Cafe Anglais. They bad just reached the 
threshold, and George wos about to step in, when he was stop- 
ped by a hand placed on his shoulder, and a voice interposed : 
" I beg your pardon, sir. A word, if you pleasB." 
George turned round in anger. The voice was well known 
to him — very unpleasantly so — and he and his friend Prosper 
recognized at once the man of the Cafe de Paris, the mun with 
the grey moustaches and buttoned-up coat — Captain Rodet 1 
Both were disconcerted — the meeting was not agreeable — but 
the young officer of dragoons, quickly recovering himself, in- 
quired, in a haughty tone, what the veteran wanted with him. 

"Very little, sir," replied the latter, in a tone of exquisite 
politeness. " I wish to return this to you, and at the same 
time to announce to you that, now you are so perfectly recov- 
ered, I will put it iu your power to receive a portion of the 
remainder." 

George had mechanically opened the paper banded to him 
by the captain. It coutained a pellet of bread. 

" Monsieur I" he said, and he was about to add, " I thought 
that a meeting, followed by a severe wound, was sufficient pun- 
ishment loi an act of thoughtlessness ;" but there was some- 
thing so austere and implacable in the veteran's looks, that 
the words stuck in his throat. But Prosper had not the same 
reasons as his friend for declining to reason upon the matter. 

" Mousieur," be said, addressing the captain, " unless yon 
are impelled by motives of personal hostility, I cannot under- 
stand what interest you can have in exacting another meeting 
on the part of M. George Benier. The insult was slight, you 
must admit, and is not your honor satisfied by the blood al- 
ready spilt ?" 

But the veteran never wavered in the inflexible expression 
which he bad assumed, and, with his eyes fixed on George, be 
awaited an answer without vouchsafing a reply to Prosper. 

" Captain," said the former, seeing there was no alternative, 
" I do not accept the words pronounced by my friend. I am 
ready to meet you where and when you like, aud we will fight 
as much as you like." 

" To-morrow evening — the same place and the same hour 
as before," replied the captain, who had resumed his most affa- 
ble manner. 
" Be it so," replied George Benier. 

Poor George ! bis skill in killing flies with pellets of bread 
was destined to entail a vast amount of misery. On the occa- 
siou of this bis second encounter, anger and hatred of bis rival 
imparted double strength to his arm. and gave unwonted 
vigor to his thrusts. But it was in vain ; the veteran parried 
bis sword as coolly as if fencing with foils. The struggle 
lasted a long time ; George became exhausted by his efforts 
aud exasperation, aud at length fell on the greensward — the 
captaiu's sword had penetrated his chest. To add to his hor- 
ror, as he lay fainting from loss of blood, be heard the old sol- 
dier say, " Adeau, till we meet again !" 

This time George remained three months in bed, and 
another month in bis arm-chair. During these long days of suf- 
fering and debility, friendship alone remained faithful to the 
poor patient. Love had taken its flight. The first day that 
George — whose life the surgeon bad despaired of for three long 
weeks — was allowed to speak. Prosper felt inclined to avoid 
bim, but George said : 

" Stsy, stay 1 Who would love me, if I were fool euough to 
quarrel with you ?" 

Prosper shook his head sorrowfully. 

" Alas V be said, " sickness tries friendship ; and love, too, 
does it not? Well, frankly, you could not expect — " 

" That Madame de Belmoute would become my nurse ? No; 
most assuredly I did not expect that. But she did not send 
to inquire after me ?" 
" Yes, for four days consecutively." 

" Four days ! Well, when I get well I will send her four 
bracelets. We must Dot expect impossibilities." 

What most surprised Prosper Dyonnot was, that as George 
BeDier recovered his strength, instead of gaining spirits with im- 
proving health, be seemed to remain anxious, and at times 
sorrowful. 

" What troubles you, George?" he inquired. " The doctor 
has said that on Saturday you can go out in the carriage, and 
yet you seem to experience some secret grief. Is it possible 
that the memory of Madame de Belmonte hauuts you ? She 
was not worthy of your love." 
George, smiling grimly, replied : 



The California!!. 



3 



" Prosper, I am melancholy, because I am afraid." 
"Afraid of what?" 

George contented himself with handing a card to his friend, 
and buried his face in his hands. 

" Captain Louis Bodet !" exclaimed Prosper. " Fool, idiot 
that I was! Yes, I understand now, my poor George. Tou 
need not blush : you fear to meet that man again, who is more 
implacable than if you had deprived him of honor, fortune, of 
all that was dear to him." 

" Yes, Prosper, that is what I dread. He has still one pel- 
let to receive satisfaction for, and he keeps it for the last. If 
I meet that man again, he will kill me." 

"Listen, George," said Prosper, taking a seat by his side. 
•' That man is an assassin. I am not a soldier, and I should 
have recourse to other means of getting rid of so bloodthirsty 
an antagonist. I would denounce him to the police." 

George shuddered. 

"No," he said, " I would never humble myself to that ex- 
tent. I have been an officer, and I could not, without brand- 
ing myself as a coward, take the step which you recommend." 

" Well, then, George, there is only one alternative. We 
must separate." - 
- " Why so ?" 

" Because you must go to Italy ; and, what is more, you 
must leave this in a fortnight. Tou must remain there six 
months or a year. 

THE THIRD PELLET. 

George Benier, although deeply grieved to part from his 
friend, resolved, after mature consideration to follow his ad- 
vice. A fortnight had not elapsed, ere be was on his way to 
a change of climate and scenery. After a month's absence 
he had regained his health and spirits. He had dismissed 
from bis mind all thoughts of his formidable creditor, who, 
possessed of a miserable pellet of bread instead of a dishon- 
ored bill, had made an ex-officer of dragoons take flight to 
other realms. It was at this epoch that his friend Prosper 
received a long letter from him. It was dated 6th of Septem- 
ber, 1825, Naples. Referring to previous communications, 
George reminded his friend that he had mentioned to him his 
having met a young person walking with her mother on the 
Monte Olivetto, with whom he had been very much smitten ; 
that he had ascertained through his friend Count Popoli that 
the ladies were French, that the mother's name was Madame 
Castillion, that she was a widow, and wealthy ; that the 
daughter's name was Blanche, that she was seventeen years of 
age, and pretty enough to put in a frame. Well, since he had 
made that communication he had been introduced to the par- 
ties, acquaintance had ripened into affection, and in a month's 
time he was to be married at the church of San Domenico. 
He insisted upon Prosper Dyonnet being present at the wed- 
ding ; he must come away at once. The ladies, on their side, 
expected one of their relations — a brother of Madame Cas- 
tillon — whom he (George Benier) was said to be acquainted 
with ; but they would not tell me his name, as they intended 
to give him an agreeable surprise ! Perchance, he said, he 
and Dyonnet might travel together. 

George was seated behind his betrothed in a box at the 
theatre of Sac Carlo. The curtain had just fallen upon the 
second act of an opera of Piccini's. George was muttering 
some words in Blanche's ear which made her smile. Madame 
Castillon, like a good mother that she was, was looking else- 
where, so that George might talk, and Blanche might smile. 

Suddenly George, whose eyes were wandering mechanically 
towards the stalls, stopped in the middle of a phrase. He 
turned pale, and a groan, that almost resembled the rattle of 
a moribund, escaped from his chest. The two ladies, sur- 
prised and terrified, turned toward him. 

" Farewell ! farewell !" he exclaimed. 

And hurrying to the door of the box he threw himself into 
the corridor, and thence gained the square of San Carlo. 

" Where is my carriage ? Oh, here it is ! Whip, coach- 
man, whip !" 

"Where is monsieur going to ?" 

" Where am I going ? Where you like. Bight before you, 
if you like it — only start." 

Without replying, the driver mounted his box, and when 
the horses, worn out with the speed at which they were driven, 
came to a dead stop, George was eight leagues from Naples. 

" What is the matter?" said George, putting his head out 
of the window. " Why don't we go on, John?" 

" Because monsieur's horses cannot go any farther," re- 
plied John. 

George jumped out, and, after some loss of time, it was as- 
certained that a village and post-house were close by, and 
thither he hastened. There happened at the very moment of 
his arrival to be a post-chaise at the door, to which a couple 
of post-horses were being harnessed. The master stood by 
superintending the operation. 

"Monsieur," said George to this man, " I want two horses 
for my carriage." 

The mau shook his head. 

" Very sorry, sir, but I have no more horses. These two 
are the last." 

George rushed at the chaise and opened the door. A man 



— an Englishman, to judge by his whiskers — was seated 
within. 

" Monsieur," said George, "I have a request of great im- 
portance to make to you." 

" Speak, sir," replied the traveler, with an accent which did 
not belie his whiskers. 

•' Will you give up your horses?" 

" Impossible, sir 1" 

'' I will give you a thousand, two thousand francs, in ex- 
change for the concession." 

" I do not want your money, sir." 

" Sir, your kindness will save my life." 

"I have not time to be kiud." 

" Sir, I will make you repent your cruelty I" 

"Bepent! Ah! Postillion, stop a moment." 

The Englishman stepped out of the chaise, and with char- 
acteristic calmness said : 

" What do you mean, sir, by saying you will make me re- 
pent?" 

" What I meant I scarcely know. Perhaps I am mad ; but, 
mad or not, it depends upon you to prevent me from being 
killed." 

The Englishman looked hard at the young man, and then 
turning round as if to re-enter his chaise, he superciliously 
remarked : 

" And what is it to me, sir, if you are killed ?" 
Goorge, irritated by his contemptuous indifference, raised 
his hand. 

At the very moment a loud noise was heard on the road. 
It was a post-chaise coming at full gallop. George heard bis 
own Dame called out in a well known voice. 

" Ah ! I am lost !" exclaimed the young man ; and a cold 
perspiration bedewed his brow. 

It was Captain Rodet in pursuit— it was Baptain Bodet 
who was calling to him. George saw him stepping rapidly 
toward him. At the sight of the man, whom he looked upon 
as bis executioner, George advanced to the encounter. 

" Kill me — assassinate me, sir," he exclaimed, " for I warn 
you I shall not fight. I am a coward ; I admit it. Kill me 
at once, for I am frightened of you !" 

George, notwithstanding his unmanly avowal, stood in the 
presence of his enemy, his head erect, his arms crossed on his 
breast, as if awaitiog death. The captain looked at the young 
as if a thunderstruck, but a strange smile played upon his 
lips. A little group of bystanders had, in the meantime, 
gathered around. The Englishman himself, taken aback by 
the strangeness of the scene, had forgotten to get into his 
chaise. Like the rest, he looked at George Bonier and then 
at Captain Bodet in presence of one another. 

At last the captain opened his mouth, and, holding out his 
right hand to George, " Who says anything about killing 
sir?" he suid, in an affectionate tone. " Who speaks to you 
about fighting? Why should I kill you ? I am Blanche's 
uncle, sir ; and I come in her name to give you this trifle, 
which belongs to you — yourself." 

George looked at the hand that was held out to him, and 
uttered an exclamation of joyful surprise. It contained the 
third pellet of bread ! The captain renounced the last meet- 
ing, to which he was entitled by the code of honor ! 

Had Captain Bodet, in reply to George's invitation, raised 
a dagger at his breast, the young man would not have sbruok, 
but to find that he was forever delivered of an implacable 
hostility was too much for him. He fell fainting to the 
ground. 

When he regained his consciousness he found himself on a 
bed in the inn, and Captain Bodet by his side. Involuntarily 
he shuddered ; but the captain was smiling. 

" What, sir," he said " are you " 

•' Tes, I am going to be your uncle, young man — precisely 
so." And, as George was about to reply, " Two words more," 
said the old soldier. " I have, perhaps, shows myself very 
severe for a slight fault. I admit it. But my excuse— you 
will understand it, my excuse — good or bad, is, that I served 
the emperor and you served the Bourbons. Austerlitz could 
not permit itself to bo eclipsed by the Trocadero. But, so 
that you may not deem me more truculent than I really am, 
know, young man, that long before my sister wrote to me that 
you desired to be her son-in-law, I had made up my mind that 
I would no longer cross swords with you. It was quite enough 
twice, was it not?" 

George rose up in his bed. 

" From all this, captain, iLresults " 

" It results, my dear George, that you are going to marry a 
charming young persou." 

" That is not precisely what I was about to say, captain." 

" Wht.t, then, were you going to say, my dear young 
friend ?" 

" Why, captain, that I was frightened. I must confess it, 
I was horribly frightened." 

The captain burst out into a joyous laugh. 

" So frightened, that, to avoid fighting me, you were going 
to fight that Englishman becausa he would not cede his horses 
to you ! Come, George," and the old soldier took him by the 
hand. 



" But Blanche — but her mother ! What shall we say to 
them to excuse my conduct ?" said George, after reflecting a 
few seconds. 

" We will tell them the truth," exclaimed the captain ; "it 
is far the shortest." 

" True. I was mad when I ran away from Blanche." 

" She thought so. Let her still deem you mad when yon 
return." 

" How so ?" 

" Madly in love !" 

George wedded Blanche, and they were happy. The moral 
of which is, that if there had been no flies in the Cafe da 
Palais Boyal in October, 1824, George Benier would never 
have fought — most probably — Captain Bodet. If Captain 
Bodet had not persecuted George, he would — most probably 
— have never gone to Italy. If he had not gone to Italy, he 
would — most probably — have never met Blanche and became 
Captain Bodet's happy nephew, and a respectable member of 
society. All's well that ends well. 

MODEEN BO ME. 

THE following pleasant bit of description is taken from 
Miss Edna Dean Proctor's last letter to the Indepen- 
dent: 

The streets of Borne are a panorama of unending interest 
and variety. The open squares are full of sunshine and the 
music of fountains, and it is like going from noon to twilight 
to step from them into the narrow, damp streets, whose tall, 
overhanging houses sometimes almost shut out the sky. Most 
noticeable among the passers-by are the clergy and the monks, 
of all names and degrees, from the cardinals, with their superb 
black horses and liveried attendants, and their gorgeous scarlet 
and purple robes, which make them look like some gigantic 
cactus blossom, to the barefooted friars, with their shuffling 
gait and dull faces and greasy cowls — the light and shade of 
the church tableau. Then there are the multitude of strangers 
of all nations who have come to pass a week or a winter at 
Borne. On foot, on horseback, in carriages, they throng the 
piazza of St. Peter's, and wake the echoes of the Coliseum, 
and explore the Appian Way, pouring in a full tide on to the 
Pincian Hill during the fashionable hours of the late afternoon. 
Last and most attractive, there are the common people, the 
Bomans of to-day. The babies, swathed like mummies, laugh 
and crow, acd look on with wide-open eyes. The larger chil- 
dren swarm in the sunny places and beside the fountains ; 
while the mothers knit or sew, or spin flax from a distaff, chat- 
tering the while in their liquid Italian. In Germany, France, 
and Switzerland it is rare to see a pretty woman among the 
laboring classes ; but among these women of Bome there are 
many faces that a painter might love to give to canvas, or a 
sculptor to marble, so glowing is the color and so fine the 
form. The Lucretias, and Cecilias, and Livias are no more ; 
but in the low, broad brows, the large, expressive eyes, the 
rich cheeks, the well cut lips and noses, and the black, lustrous 
hair of some of these Giuliettas, and Marias, and Agneses, I 
fancy I see their transmitted charms. Nothing can be more 
picturesque than a group of these women, in their gay cos- 
tumes, (a scarlet bodice, or a small bright shawl folded sur- 
plicewise across the bosom, their glossy braids of hair confined 
at the back with a silver pin or arrow, and always the gold or 
coral necklace and earrings, procured often with difficulty and 
worn with pride) abroad with their children, bargaining in the 
market or gossiping, as they love to do, beside the clear foun- 
tain under the azure sky. As for the men, they throw the 
corner of their loose cloaks over the left shoulder, with a grace 
worthy of the ancient toga, and work, or lounge, or. beg with 
equal ease and unconcern. Speaking of these handsome, dark 
women reminds me, by contrast, of one exquisitely fair, whom 
I saw at table d'hote at the Hotel de Grande Bretange, in 
Florence. Noticing her delicate bloom and her golden curls, 
tied with a blue ribbon, I said to myself, This must be a Scotch 
lassie— some lily of Liddesdale. After dinner, as I passed out 
of the room, I heard the waiter reply, to the inquiries of an 
anxious Englishman, " Yes, sir ; the Duke and Duchess of 
Argyle and their daughter. They sat on the left of the table." 
So I was right, and the lovely flower was indeed of Scottish 
growth ; the lily, not of Liddesdale, but of lnverary and the 
Clan Campbell. . 

Sewing Machines.— Mr. Alonzo Taylor, Manufacturer of 
Shuttle Stitch Sewing Machines, 90 East 39th Street, New 
York, states that he has purchased nearly a dozen Grover & 
Baker Machines for his friends, to be used in their families, 
because he thought they would do the work better than Shut- 
tle Machines. 

[From testimony taken be/ore the U. S. Commissioner of 

Patents, on the application for the extension of the patent 
for the Grover & Baker S eeing Machine .] 

Poverty, like other bullies, is formidableTnly to those who 
show that they are afraid of it. 

Music is the most delightful rational entertainment that the 
human mind can possibly enjo y. 

Revenge is a^c^niorTpuuctual paymaster than grati- 
tude. 



t 

4 



The Californian. 



LITERARY GOSSIP AND GLEANINGS. 

emerson's new volume. 

THE appearance of Emerson's new volume of poems en- 
titled " May-Day, and Other Pieces," just published by 
Ticknor & Fields, is one of the most noteworthy literary events 
of the season. The following is a characteristic extract, the 
source of which could scarcely be mistaken by any admirer of 
the Concord poet and philosopher : 

I heard or seemed to hear the chiding Sea 
Say, Pilgrim, why eo late and plow to come ? 
Am I not always here, thy Summer home | 
Is not my voice thy music", mom aud eve ? 
My breath thy healthful climate in the heats. 
My touch thy antidote, my bav thy bath ? 
Was ever building like my tresses ? 
Was ever couch magnificent as mine ? 
Lie on the warm rook-ledges, aud there learn 
A little lot suffices like a town. 
I make your sculptured architecture vain, 
Vain beside mine. I drive my wedges home, 
And carve the coastwise mountain into caves. 
Lo! here is Rome, and Ninevah, and Thebes, 
Karnak, and Pyramid, and Giant's Stairs, 
Half-piled or prostrate ; and my newest slab 
Older than all thy race. ^ 



in some very slinging verses. After the appearance of the 
volume of 1833, Coleridge said of Tennyson that some of his 
poems showed ' a good deal of beauty,' but he added that be 
had • begun to write verses without very well understanding 



it were, paralized, or rather exhausted, by excessive concen- 
tration on the 6ingle resolve to be one with her husband. That 
in her antiseptic, the one thing which preserves her nature 



Behold the Sea, 
The opaline, the plentiful and strong. 
Yet beautiful as is the rose in June, 
Fresh as the trickling rainbow of July ; 
Sea full of food, the nourisher of kinds, 
Purger of earth, and medicine of meu ; 
Creating a 6weet climate by mv breath, 
Washing out harms and griefs from memorv, 
And, in my mathemalic ebb aud ilow, 
Giving a hint of that which chauges not. 
Rich are tLe sea-gods : who gives gifts but thev ? 
They grope the 6ea for pearls, but more than pearls . 
They pluck Force thence, and give it to the wise. 
For every wave is wealth to Daedalus. 
Wealth to the cunning artist who cau work 
This matchless strength. Where shall we find, O waves ! 
A load your Atlas shoulders cannot lift .' 

I with my hammer pounding overcome 
The rocky coast, smite Audt-ft into dust, 
Strewing my bed, and in another age, 
Rebuild a contineut for better men. 
Theu I unbar the doors ; iny paths lead out 
The exodus of nations ; I disperse 
Men to all shores that frout the hoary main. 

I too have arts and sorceries : 
Illusion dwells forever with the wave. 
I know what spells are laid. Leave me to deal 
With credulous and imaginative man ; 
For, though he scoop my water in his palm, 
A few rods off he deems it gems and clouds. 
Planting strange li nits and sunshine on the shore. 
I make some coast alluring, some lone isle. 
To distant men, who must go there or die. 

" TENNYSONIANA." 

This is the title of a small volume of about 170 pages, 
written by some fervent admirer ol the genius of the English 
Laureate, who has devoted much time and industry to a kind 
of work seldom undertaken during the life of the person who 
is its subject. Jt contains many curious results ot a careful 
collection and collation of the different editions of Tennyson's 
poems, together with numerous personal details which will be 
interesting to the poet's admirers, and extremely valuable to 
his future biographer. Our knowledge of the book is derived 
from the notices of it in the foreign papers, one of which 
eays : 

" It 6eems that the first literary production of Alfred Ten- 
nyson appeared about forty years ago. It was printed and 
publised at Louth, in Lincolnshire (Tennyson's native county) 
and was entitled ' Poems by Two Brothers.' The ' two broth- 
ers ' were Alfred aud Charles Tennyson, though their names 
did not appear on the title-page. Alfred was at that time in 
the eighteenth year of his age ; and he and his brother, with 
becoming modesty, adopted as their motto the following words 
from Martial—' Ha;c nos novimus esse nihil ' (We know this 
to be nothiug). 1 R. H. S.' gives us but few specimens of this 
volume ; but we may safely infer that the contents were poor 
enough. Some of the titles suggest the old poetical common- 
places of young beginners—' Lines to Memory,' ' The Exile's 
Harp,' ' Remorse,' ' We Meet no More,' 'To Fancy,' I Mid- 
night,' Friendship,' 'On Sublimity,' 'Time, an Ode,' etc. 
Others have an odd tone of something formal and old-fash- 
ioned ; as, ' Lines to One who Entertained a Light Opinion of 
an Eminent Character.' ' On the Death of my Grandmother,' 
' On being asked for a Simile to illustrate the Advantage of 
keeping the Passions subservient to Reason,' ' Short Eulogium 
on Homer,' etc. Others, again, betray that the brothers 
shared in the then prevalent excitement in favor of the Hel- 
lenes ; for we find poems called ' Greece,' and ' Exhortation 
to the Greeks.' Byron seems to have had a powerful influ- 
ence on the minds of the youthful poets ; one of their pieces 
is called ' On the Death of Lord Byron,' and lines from the 
author of 1 Childe Harold ' are frequently used as mottoes 
The first conspicuous work of Alfred Tennyson was his Cam- 
bridge Prize Poem, ' Timbuctoo ' (182-9), which was very eu- 
logistically noticed in the Alkencpum of July 22nd of that 
year, aud which was certainly distinguished by some noble 
passages. In 1830 appeared ' Poems, chiefly Lyrical, by Al- 
fred Tennyson." This was the volume which contained ' Mari- 
ana in the Moated Grange.' It was well received npon the 
whole— the Westminster Review (in an article, it is thought, 
by Mr. John Stuart Mill) hailing it as a work of great prom 
ise ; Leigh Hant, in the Taller, contrasting the two brothers, 
in a series of articles, and concluding by giving the palm to 
Alfred ; and Professor Wilson, in Blackwood's Magazine, 
' mingling praise aud blame,' as Tennyson afterward told us 



what metre is.' And he ' prescribed ' to him to write for two j from rott ' D g as natures rot under crime ; and to make his 
or three years ' in none but one or two well-known and strictly- will so inferior to hers that hers cannot have ceased to oper- 
defined metres, such as the heroic couplet, the octave stauza, ; a te, not to spend on him some of the labor he has speut on 

or the octosyllabic measure,' as a corrective to the 



ooseness 

of his new metres, some of which Coleridge said he could 1 
scarcely scan. Woodsworth, in 1845, spoke of Tennyson as j 
' Decidedly the first of our living poets,' though it seems that 
be had originally, unlike Leigh Hunt, regarded Charles as the 
better poet. The very curious little volume of ' R. H. S. | 
contains a great many collations of first and second readings 
of passages in the chief poems (Teunyson is a great corrector 
a complete list of the poet's writings ; an account of the Ten- 
nyson portraits ; various literary and biographical particulars, 
and some remarks on Tennyson's versification, in which it is 
shown that the stanza of 'In Memoriam ' is borrowed from 
Ben Johnson." 



her, is defective art." 



EDMUND YATES HARRIET ROUT II. 

The London Spectator, in a decidedly clever criticism of Ed- 
mund Yates' novel, " Black Sheep," has some judicious and 
rather striking comments on Harriet Routh, by far the most 
original character in the book, and one that is drawn with con- 
siderable pscychological insight. The critic 3ays : 

" Mr. Yates has tried to sketch in ber one of the most singu- 
lar, yet not most iufrequent of mental phenomena — the loss 
of identity, the merging, as it were, of ouo nature into another 
so absolutely that it assifits in evil, without, so far as human 
eye can trace, itself becoming a3 evil as its partner. Harriet 
Routh, a clever governess of good emotions and no particular 
principles, meets her husband, a villuuons black-leg, dying in 
an inn on the Contineut. Moved by some instinct or an irre- 
sistible pity, she refuses to let bim die alone, nurses him, is 
dismissed by her employers, and on his recovery marries him. 
Thenceforward she becomes absorbed in him, till her own na- 
ture seems to disapoear : enters into his Dcfarious projects, 
aids with him the higher couruge and brighter brain than his 
owu to swindle friends ; becomes, in fact, an accomplice, while 
remaining the cheerful, loving, devoted, unselfish wife. 

All this while, it is impossible, though she has sunk in 
action to the sharper's.level, to hold her morally equally de- 
graded. By a thousaud touches, some of them, we suspect, 
unconscious, ns if Mr. Yates were sketching something he had 
seen and only half understood, the author gives us to under- 
stand that she is not lost ; that virtues remain, thongh all are 
misdirected. She is a swindler absolutely truthlul to herself 
and her husband, a cheat who is absolutely sincere, a loving 
woman who is pitiless to all but one, but has, in her mad con- 
centration to that one. scarcely human sympathies for others 
— a woman full, to use the only word which will express the 
thought, of piety, but a piety for him, not God. It is not an ordi- 
nary passion which is described, but an absolute merging of the 
identity of the moral nature, such as some heretics have tried 
to believe the true relation of woman to man. You feel that, 
but for Routh, Harriet would be a queenly nature. At last it 
becomes essential to his plans to commit a murder — very ar- 
tistically suppressed as to details by Mr. Yates — and throw 
the suspicion on a friend : and Harriet, cognizant of the 
former, personally arranges for the latter. Then comes the 
finest stroke Mr. Yates probably ever conceived. 

Murder differs from all other crimes in the remorse it cie- 
ates, and most novelists would have made Harriet repent. He 
makes her break. She has lost her identity too completely to 
repent ; at all events till Routh does ; but she bows down 
under the scathing effect of crime ; begins, for the first time 
in her life, to think of risk, to feel fear and doubt ; her head 
irets hot, her veins fill, and once she urges her husband to es- 
cape, leaving her to face consequences alone. He, all the while, 
in bis meanness, is beginning, as one who know.- too much, to 
fear and hate her ; but even estrangement or treachery cannot 
restore her moral nature ; she protects him to the last, once 
using his mistress to do it, and when all is discovered, carries 
him poison in prison ; and then, with full means of retreat be- 
fore her, drags herself to the enter gate, and thinking how he 
is dying withiD, sits till either by death, heart-break, or by 
poison, she terminates her existence with his. It is the pas- 
sion which Mary of Scots entertained for Bothwell described, 
and well described, in a sharper's wife. 

This is at least a striking idea, so strikiug that we wish its 
execution were more equal aud more thorough. It is too 
sketchily done. We do not see enough of Harriet or Har 
riet's mind, and the original- design is marred by two great 
blots. Such cases of absolutely merged identity, of one na- 
ture so absorbed in another as to leave no room for judgment 
on that other's acts certainly do occur, but they always de- 
uund two conditions. First, that the merged nature shall 
not be absolutely superior at all points to the one in which it 
is merged, and Harriet Routh's is. Routh has uothing in him 
whatever that we can nee — has not his wife's courage, or 
brain, or unselfishness, or capacity of loviug, or sovereigu 
strength of will. There is no reason why his wife's will should 
in his presence cease to act except in accord with his, yet if 
it does not, where is tho excuse for her? Do3e not Mr. Yates 
see that good remains in Harriet in spite of her criminality, 
because to be criminal one must will crime, and ber will is, as 



A Southern Drama. — A Memphis paper contains an ac- 
count of a poem " by a lady," which is entitled Helvington, 
a Dramatic Story, aud which may be properly ranked among 
the curiosities of literature. Here is an extract, showing the 
style in which Isabel Rivers, the heroiue. and ber mother talk 
of the passage of the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment through 
Baltimore : 

"Mrs. R.— Oh ! would I could forget! 
It is too deeply graved upon my mind- 
That first dark day that ushered in the train 
Of all onr days of woe— that accursed day, 
Th' insulting tread of Lincoln's men, his hosts 
Of low born hirelings fell upou the streets 
Of proud old Baltimore. 

"Isabel.— -»•»•« 
And my dear father, fired with patriotic bats 
And scorn for tyranny, rushed from his hearth 
To meet, to face, that coward host— defied, and — died'." 

The heroine and her mother being confined in Fort Lafay- 
ette, thus discuss the binding obligation of oaths of allegi- 
ance : 

" Isabel. — I'd pile up oaths until tltey reached the tky, 
And every one ait t'alne as the false foe 
That forces them on us. sooner than have 
Our pearl defaced— our darling Margaret!" 

«**♦*♦• 

" Mks. R. — Let your untaught tongue run glib 
With Lincoln's oaths — repress the scorn you feel — 
High Heaven will uot record the sin against you." 

Tbey both take the oath upon the Bible. The band strik- 
ing up Yankee Doodle, Isabel is made to exclaim : 
" Detested air ! 
Fit symphony for oaths as false as this!" 

Miss Augusta Evans, the "Great Southern Novelist," 
must look to her laurels. 



Boyhood's Pleasures and Penalties. — A youngster 
came home after having a glorious time in the paddles, bis 
face all aglow and his boots full of water. The punishment 
of staying in the house for the remainder of the day did not 
seem very hard ; but as his little heart warmed np with the 
recollection of tho triumphs of the morning, when be bad 
waded deeper than any of his playmates dared to, he coald 
bear the restraint no longer, and weut to his mother saying, 
" Please, mother, whip me, aud let me go out again !" Hu- 
man nature could not resist such an appeal, aud, though the 
mother's heart had some misgivings as to the propriety of in- 
dulging her son. he was allowed his liberty, and received a 
caress instead of a flogging. 

Origin of thh Term Perfume. — The first perfumes were 
obtained by a combustion of aromatic woods and gums (hence 
the name per/nmam, " through smoke ") aud the first use 
primitive nations made of them was to offer them on tbe altars 
erected to their gods, perhaps with tbe mystic idea that their 
prayers would reach them 60oner wafted on the blue wreaths 
of smoke, or for the less poetical purpose of couuteracting tbe 
smell of the flesh burned in their sacrifices. Modern incense 
derives its sweet balsamic smell from benzoin (Slyraj: benzoin), 
which also formed one of tbe chief ingredients in pastilles and 
fumigating papers. — Kimmal on Floxcers and their Uses. 

Tiikre is one advautage in being a blockhead — you are 
never troubled with low spirits or apoplexy. The moment a 
man can worry he ceases to bo a fool. 

Many people consider the world as a worm docs the in- 
terior of a nut — simply a place to feed and grow fat in. 

Bury your troubles, but don't linger around the grave-yard 
conjuring up their ghosti to haunt you. 

Heaven has promised pardon to him that repents; but it 
has uot promised repentance to him that sins. 

Tun true man walks calmly amid tbe wickedness and cruel- 
ties of the world, liko Daniel among the lions. 

To be able to bear provaction, is aii argument of great 
wisdom ; and to forgive it, of great mind. 

About the age of thirty-six, the lean , man generally be- 
comes fatter, and the fat man leaner. 

Though we travel tbe world over to find the beaatrfal, w« 
must carry it with us, or we fiud it not. 

Ridicule is a kind of weapon that should have a button of 
good nature on the poiot of it. 

The hungry mouth no more readily finds food than the 
hungry mind finds truth. 

No man can avoid his own company — so he hail best make 
it as good as possible. 

Error loves to walk arm-in-arm with truth, to make itself 
thought respectable. 

Hypocrities are beings of darkness disguised in garment* 
of light. 



The "Californian. 



[For the Californian.] 

VALE! 

fTIHE etaff is crumbling in my hand, 

The pride is breaking in my heart ; 
The soul of fire is smouldsring ashes, % 
The flame of Life will soon depart. 

Bright shining stars will shine for others, 
Dear flowera will bloom for other eyes ; 

The Moon for lovers trim her crescent, 
And sail across the evening skies. 

But I shall sleep— perchance forever, 

While otners laugh, and others weep ; 
While others to delights surrender 

Which I have bad but could not keep. 

The changeful living will froget me, 

I breathe it with a sob of pain ; 
The changeless dead — I shall be with them, 

Whose world is either loss or gain. 

Well — be it so, since so it must be, 

The grave is narrow, dark und cold ; 
And butjthat gallant spirits rest thero, 

To die would be despair untold. 

Farewell, sweet Muse ! ah, I have been 

Your constant lover — bootless wooer ; 
Farewell to friends most sorely tried, 

Whose largess did not wait the suer. 

Farewell to mountains, cloud-aspiring, 
Whose heights ambitious youth has trad ; 

Farewell to seas whose mighty breakers 
The feet of streugth have walked unshod. 

Farewell to day's sunshiny glory, 

Farewell to twilight's tender glow ; 
Farewell to all the gentle pleasures 

That Nature's guileless children know. 

Farewell, farewell ! there is no morrow, 
The lists are closed, the world rolls by , 

A warrior leaves the wide arena, 

Whose shield is blank, whose blade is dry, 

June, 1867. * * * » * . 

|For the Californian.] 

STREET CAR REFLECTIONS. 

BV PRENTICE. 

A FEW" mornings since, a young man with his arm in a 
sling became my fellow passenger. He brought with him 
a companion with whom he conversed in a loud tone of voice. 
He told him how his arm was crushed, how it hurt him, and 
how the snrgeon set it. _He gave us a graphic idea of the set- 
ting of broken bones, and the exquisite pain attendant on such 
operations. He gave particular attention also to the crushing 
so that no effort was requisite by a vivid imagination to con- 
ceive a lively image of macerated human flesh and bones. All 
of us could hear him above the nimble of the car. It was in- 
teresting — especially to the narrator. If not entirely agreable 
to his involuntary and confined audience, it was thrilling and 
conducive to cold chills. 

Once we thought he had ended. This was a mistake. He 
had but stopped to take breath and reinforce his recollection. 
There were a few details relative to the setting which had not 
been sufficiently wrought up to suit him, and these he mani- 
pulated with such diabolical skill that all the hearers could 
themselves feel the twists and wrenches the young man felt 
while undergoing the manipulations of his anotomical carpen- 
ter. How, for the time being, we wished it had been his 
neck ! And the young man's fearful narrative went on and 
on, and round and round, until he and his accompanying lis- 
tener stepped out of the car. 

That listener, by the way, was quite as reprehensible as the 
fractured young man. Had he not been along there would 
have been no human receptacle for the inpouring of this hor- 
rible tale. 

Yet why am I so selfish as to begrudge that young raau the 
pleasure of telling his story ? It does him good. . Perhaps it 
is his only recompense for the suffering and weary hours re- 
sulting from the accident. I ought not to have been annoyed 
at the discourse, for from my youth up I have suffered a terri- 
ble breakfast and tea-table experience, in the recital of dis- 
tressing cases of disease and death-bed experiences from elderly 
ladies of strong religious tendencies, but tinged with ghoul- 
like inclinations. I ought, by this time, to be used to such 
things. 

Then I found myself sorry because he had left. I ■discov- 
ered that h* had amused as well as annoyed me. He had 
made my other fellow beings nncomfortable. Of course in 
that there were a few grains of satisfaction. Misery loves 
company, a miserable love, however, of misery. 

There is a man in our car who is evidently in a great hurry 
to terminate his trip. He fidgets and twist and looks out of 
the wiudow to note the distance accomplished. He is in 
great twitterdegee externally, and a greater, oue internally. 
Mentally , he is in the condition of a decapitated hen. He is 
uncomfortable because he knows not how to wait. Waiting, 
is a science. To learn to wait is to learn to bo parent ; to, 
learn to be patient is to study and investigate. Study and 
investigation lend, to discovery ; discovery to happiness. I 



know this. I have swallowed oceans of misery foe years and 
years in waiting for almost everthiug a man can wait for, and 
I am waiting for many thing3 yet. It is by waiting we are 
made to see what is goiug on around us, and next what is 
transpiring inside of us. 

Our impatient friend has sent his soul far ahead of him to 
his place of destination, and the poor soul vainly strives to 
drag the body after it. Hence, impatience, vain longing, rest- 
lessness. 

My dear wretch, do try and see if you cannot enjoy, and at 
the same time improve this bit of the present which is always 
with you. Now the admonition " improve your time " has, in 
consequence of early and disagreeable associations, a harsh and 
gloomy sound to many of us. I was constantly, when a child, 
pestered with this precept, by parents, guardians, ministers, 
deacons, Sunday-School teachers, and a great many other peo- 
ple, who said it because they did not know what else to say, 
and who did not exactly comprehend what they were saying 
either, just a3 some good people think they must quote, and 
often misquote, scripture, while visiting the sick. 

So, being a conscientious and obedient urchin, I strove to 
improve my time. I read and perspired over works greatly 
above my comprehension , I twisted my legs in a nervous em- 
brace of those of the table, and ran out my tongue iu spiral 
contortions, while vainly endeavoring to write political, meta- 
physical and philosophical essays. Finally, I became tired 
and disgusted. I gave up trying to " improve the time " and 
" not to lose a moment." I became a bad boy. I went 
over to the enemy. From the model boy of the Academy I 
became a Benedict Arnold, and to the Sunday School a Judas 
Iscanot. There was no one in those days who knew how to 
show me rightly the method of improving time. I mistook 
the road'and tried to become somebody else. 

But yon, my unfortunate impatient, need make no such mis- 
take. You are looking from your wiudows at that shrew who 
so vigorously inflicts castigation on her unfortunate child for 
falling in the gutter. You are thinking of the injustice of 
the punishment. Yon are indignant at the woman. Now 
look inside. Why did you speak so cross to your owu respon- 
sibilities just before leaving home? Because one wanted a 
pair ol new shoes. Because another had brought home a 
miserable stray dog for a pet. You do not like dogs. They 
are useless and expensive. Billy has littered up the backyard 
in the construction of a rabbit pen. It is chasotic in design 
and the materials are widely and untidily dispersed. Besides 
you do not fancy rabbits about the house. Hence the domes- 
tic typhoon which signalized your departure. Which stands 
highest, you or the shrew ? 

There steps'io old Dogmatic as pompous and conceited as 
ever. How you dislike him! And yet it was but, yesterday 
you looked down with just such an air of superiority on that 
poor restaurant waiter when he mistook your order. 

You are very much disgusted at the good-natured specimen 
of intoxication who has just entered with a red and gray com- 
plexion, the red being the alcoholic bloom, the gray resulting 
from an unshaven beard, who persists in talkiug to you, and 
who shows symptoms of a design of embracing. 

Good-natured inebriation when in the embracing mood, is 
worse than combative inebriation. The latter can be kicked 
out if fortunately sufficiently demonstrative, but the former 
must be endured. Even an nngel on one of those " visits, few 
and far between," to realize our idea of an angel, must come 
sober. Do you suppose you could endure a drunken angel at 
a select private party ? 

W r ell, yon are disgusted and annoyed. Yon bind that mis- 
erable man hand and foot and tos3 him into the scales. You 
heap on the weights of condemnation and your own rectitude. 
The inebriate rises high in the balance and i3 found wanting, 
until suddenly there flashes upon your mind the recollection of 
your own condition on that very same car some three months 
ago, when you made such extrrordiuary speeches to a lady 
with whom you had a passing acquaintance. Then there is 
not so great a discrepancy in weight after ail. 

" Well, all this moralizing may be very useful but I don't 
see the enjoyment of the thing," says our impatient friend. 

Has not the time passed the quicker for these thoughts ? 
That is one point gained. Unpleasant they may be. Nearly 
all the initiatory steps toward true happiness are unpleasant. 
You crept and stumbled Uefore you could walk, you stammered 
before you could talk, you cut a most ridiculous figure in 
learning to waltz, yon howled dismally before your voice was 
attuned to melody, and you practiced laboriously and drove 
many unfortunates compelled to remain within hearing nearly 
distracted ere you could manipulate the piano with such art 
and skill. 

In theso affections you are tread'mg on the boundaries of the 
vast territory of soul within yon, full of grand avenues of 
thought to be traveled with the vigorous stride of youth, of 
retired lanes in which you may leisurely walk, and of shady 
nooks and dells where you may repose. No other territory in 
the world is like unto it, no more than you aro like anyone 
else. No one save you pan explore it. There are battles to 
be fought, however, and it must be conquered ere it cuu be 
possessed. As you press forward, other and more beautiful 
view3 will constantly open beyond still tempting you onward, 
yet memory will always carry you back to the sweet spots 
passed over. It may be tutored by many humble gates and 
one of them is our street car.J 



DRAMATIC AFFAIRS. 

THE spectacular play of The Elves ran at Maguire's Opera 
House until last night, when The Naiad Queen was pro- 
duced in fine style, with Mrs. Sophie Edwin as " Surline," 
Miss Sallie Hinckley as " Sir Rupert," and the entire corpa 
de ballet of the Martinetti Troupe in dances, marches and 
tableaux. This attractive spectacular piece will be presented 
this afternoon and evening. During the present holiday times 
it is fit thtt these spectacular fairy plays in which children so 
much delight should be produced. 

During the coming week the romantic drama entitled Tim 
Spanish Dancers will be produced. - 

This afternoon and evening the Mikado Japanese Troupe 
give their last two performances at the Academy of Music. 
Those who have not yet witnessed the wonderful screen act as 
performed by Gosbigeeroand his Dreity daughter, MissOyonsh- 
kee, should not fail to bo present at either the niorninn- or 
evening performance. The rope-walking and balaucing feats 
performed by this troupe are very wonderful, and far surpass 
those performed by the troupes which preceded them. 

Oo Monday the Academy of Music will remain closed. On 
Tuesday the inmates of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum will give 
a public exhibition in this theater. The proceeds will be de- 
voted to their library fund. The pantomime of the imperson- 
ators of "The French Spy,'' " The Old Corporal," and other 
mute characters is far surpassed Dy the wonderful perform- 
ances of these stricken ones whom art has instructed how to 
suppiy the deficiencies of nature. All who have witnessed the 
pantomime of the mutes have been delighted. An entertain- 
ment such as this should attract at least as large a house as 
assembles to witness the feats of Japanese gymnasts. 

This afternoon and evening Harry Leslie and Harry Raynor, 
Henrie Herberte, Miss Julia Gould and the troupe of min- 
strels will give their two last performances. The burlesque 
opera of Maritrtna, which has been such a popular feature of 
the performance during the week, will be presented this even- 
ing for the last time. Those who have not listened to the 
clever songs of Harry Leslie and Harry Raynor, laughed at 
their grotesque negro acts and been present at the capital op- 
eratic performance have missed a treat. 

On Monday the Great Dragon Troupe of Japanese jongleurs, 
equilibrists, rope dancers and musical and dancing girls, will 
make their appearance at the Metropolitan Theater. In this 
troupe we have conjurors, a clown, many balancers, numerous 
acrobats, O-mu-tu-san, a Japanese ballafc girl, and other ar- 
tistes — twenty-six in all. These performers are, we are assured, 
all high artistes in their profession, and are confidently backed 
by the management to quite surpass all the performers who 
have left Japan. Their stay iu San Francisco must be limited 
to a few days, as they are bound for the Paris Exposition. 

The next sensation in the dramatic world which we may ex- 
pect is the arrival of Edwin Adams, who is due on Tuesday. 
He will probably open his engagement at Maguire'a Opera 
House the week after cext, in Hamlet. 

There is some talk of producing sacred operas on Sunday, 
Whether or not this will conflict with the Sabbatarians' pet 
law remains to be proved. 

Mrs. Laura Cuppy lectures as usual to-morrow at the Me- 
chanics' Institmte Hall. 

The celebrated Do Save troupe of male and female gym- 
nasts will appear at the Academy of Music next week on the 
off niahts of the Opera season. The ladies of this troupe 
perform the Niagara Leap and numerous feats on the trapeze. 

ToucnsTONE. 

Woodward'r Gardens. — The curious wild beasts, the 
beautiful flowers, the collection of paintings and other works 
of art, delight crowds who daily Hock to these gardens. No 
more delightful spot for a picnic can be found than these 
pleasure grounds. 

Pacific Mcseum. — Xq less thau three pickled murderer's 
heads are to be seen at this establishment. The most won- 
derful freaks of nature are exhibited here as well as models of 
all parts of the human frame. 

California Winks— The fame of California wines is spreading 
far and wide, and the choice varieties may he Inund <m the dinner 
tables of the high aud mighty ones of New York and other Eastern, 
States. Some of the best wines which have giiued for California 
this high reputation as a wine growing country, have been produced 
by the United Anaheim Wine-Growers' Association, :). r il Montgomery 
street. 15. Dreyfus, the manager, assures us that he has at present 
some Port and Angoliea wine, which has seldom, if ever, bcou. 
eQualled ou this coast. 

Dyspepsia Ccred, not patched up, guaranteed thorough, and to the 
eutiro satisiai iion of the invalid, by the unfailing process of Dr. 
Bonnie, 10 Masonic Temple. 

Poison Oak. — The efl'ectH of this pestiferous shrub are now. moe* 
virulent. Dr. Bourne's method is the only reliable cure. Ho. lOMn 
sonic TemplfrpPosl street. 

"Dm. Bourne's Baths"— The unifonu'.esliniouy in, that a* a lux- 
ury, or for the cure of ailments, they are unequalled. No. 1(1 Masonic 
Te"mple, Post street. 

Young Men requiring the aid of a physician can receive important 
information, gratuitously, Ubyflapply tog to Dr. Bourne 10 Masoniq 
Temple, * 



6 



The Calilornian. 



STATUE OF CLEOPATRA. 

VXTHAT ! tbis cold quarry-staff for Antony's queen ; 

» » Marble for fire ; the sculptured art of eyes 
For that consummate passion that, between 

Love and desire, shook kingdoms with her sighs. 
Yet thus she might have looked when the red asp 

Had sucked the sultry Egypt from her veins ; 
But not when love warm from her -warrior's clasp, 

The sweet mouth blossomed with the mixed lip status. 

Those beautiful lips and bountiful, that crushed 

The blood-red out of his own, and clung 
With ripe possession till lhe bosom blushed, 

And all the seething senses swayed and swung. 
Eyes that smote eyes with blindness, perilous deep 

As soundless cisterns of delirious light ; 
Limbs, lustrous as the lotus-laving sweep 

Of the Nile waters when the moon is white. 
The sumptuous sense of woman ; the rare feast 

Of queeuly body and voluptuous breath, 
To comfort and make glad the enamoured beast 

That crawls and basks and bites it to tbe death. 

— Round Table. 

ENGINE-DRIVERS AND THEIR WAYS. 

MR. FRITH'S " Railway Station " is one of the most 
popular pictures ever paiQted, and all the officials in it 
are taken from life. The driver is from a photograph ; and it 
will interest the readers of these lines, should he go to see the 
picture, to know that this very man made, it is believed, the 
fastest trip ever known. This was from London to Didcot ; 
he accomplished the journey, just fifty-three miles, in forty- 
seven minutes. It happened that a comrade had run the trip 
in forty-seven and a half, and Mr. Frith's hero resolved to beat 
him. He did beat him ; and auother first-rate man openly de- 
clared his determination to do it in less time : but an order 
was judiciously issued which stopped this rather alarming 
rivalry. The desire to run excessively fast is, curiously 
enough, generally traceable to the pride each man has in his 
engine, which may be compared to the well-known feeling of 
the groom toward his horse. The engine-driver has too much 
riding and tearing along to care for racing on his own account ; 
but that the " Rhinoceros " should be beaten by the " Hip- 
popotamus " is not to be borne. Even good-tempered men 
become offensive when championing the merits of their en- 
gines ; it is so difficult for them to exalt their favorite without 
depreciating competitors. To what a pitch this feeling goes 
may be illustrated by a little anecdote. A man who had just 
come in from a very long trip with a goods train — only those 
who are familiar with railway work can appreciate the differ- 
ence between driving a goods train for one hundred and twenty 
miles and doing the same amount of passenger work — threw 
his greatcoat across his arm, and, swinging his can and basket 
in his right hand, walked slowly and heavily up the slope home- 
wards, his fireman slouchiug behind him. Bed was evidently 
his immediate destination, and the poor fellow wanted rest 
badly enough. Great, therefore, was the surprise of his chief 

and I may say of myself too — to see, about fifty minutes 

afterwards, the same driver coming down the slope, followed 
again by his fireman, carrying greatcoat, can, and basket, all 
as before. 

" Beg your pardon, sir," said the driver, " but I hear you 
are a cuing to seud 1 Kaffir' — this was the name of the engine 
out again to-night, with Tom Baldwin.'' 

" Ye3," replied the chief; "you know we are very short of 
engines." • 

" Well, sir," returned the man, " he's not a bit of good to 
her ; be don't understand her, sir; he'll spoil her ; and il you'll 
allow me, sir, me and my mate will run the trip to night." 

" You I" exclaimed the superintendent ; " you cau't — you're 
knocked up." 

" Not a bit of it, sir," replied tbe driver. " Anyhow, sir, I 
can do more with ' Kaffir' than he can, and I II never have 
such an engine drove by him, if I can help it." 

And out of devotion to his great, uugaiuly goods engine, 
the driver, instead of going to bed, chose to pass another 
night without sleep, and to run over another six or seven score 
miles of rail. 

Sometimes the feeling will manifest itself in a still stranger 
manner. An excellent plan is adopted on railways of taking 
the pressure off old boilers — that is. when an engine has run 
a certain number of miles, although uo symptoms of weakness 
may appear, yet as wtar must have been going on, the press- 
ure at which the steam blows off is reduced from, say, one 
hundred and twenty pouods to the square iuch, by which, of 
course, the bursting of the boiler is rendered more improba- 
ble. It may be noticed here that so great an improvement in 
juality of fuel and Completeness of combustion has, during 
the last few years, been effected, that, an ens'me will run thirty 
or forty thousand more miles with the same set of tuoes than 
would have worn it out some years back. Of course, when 
the pressure of steam is reduced, the power of the engine is 
reduced in proportion, and I have known a driver, whose fav- 
orite engine was in the factory for repairs, wait upon the en- 
gineer and beg and pray, as the phrase goes, that authority 
to forego his intention of diminishing the pressure ; being 



quite willing to risk his own life and that of his firemau rather 
than his iron steed should suffer in her reputation for speed 
and drawing power. Not, be it understood, that any engine 
has any reputation beyond her driver, and a very few equal. 

It will be easily understood that engine-drivers are intensely 
professional ; the ruling spirit, 1 have uo doubt, is strong with 
them in death, though tbis, of course, I cannot easily prove. 
I know of one instance, however, where the engine, at some 
obstacle, leaped from the line when running at great speed on 
a high embankment. " It's all up, mate," exclaimed the 
driver, " but bold ou to the brake." His mate did eo, while 
he held on to the regulator. The engine and tender turned 
right over, and pitched with terriffic force into a meadow be- 
low. No one could ever account for the escape of the men, 
but beyond stunning each of them for a short time, and knock- 
ing out the whole of driver's front teeth, no great harm was 
done. 

I really think, although 1 by no mears urge the companies 
to relax the stringency of their rules on the point, and would 
certainly rather not travel by the train while the experiment 
was trying, that even a drunken driver would hardly make any 
mistake in his signals, and in support of this an odd illustra- 
tion may be given. A driver, not on duty, had been drinking, 
aud was, in company with his fireman, walking in the vicinity 
of the Edeware Road, when lie suddenly started violently, and 
seizing his mate's arm, shouted : 

" Hold hard, mate— hold hard !" 

" What's the matter ?" cried the fireman. 

" Matter !" roared the driver, " why, you're running by the 
red light ;" and he pointed to the crimson glare which 
•treamed through a glass bottle in a chemist's wiudow. 

" Come along ; that's nothing," said the fireman, trying to 
drag him on. 

" What, run by the red light, and go afore Dannel in the 
morning?" retorted the driver, and no persuasion could or did 
get him to pass the shop. He was a Great Western man, and 
the " Dannel " whom be held in such wholesome awe was the 
celebrated engineer, now Sir Daniel Gooch, and chairman of 
that line. He was then the locomotive chief, and renowned 
above all other things for maintaining discipline among his 
staff, while they cherished a feeling for him very much akin to 
what we hearof theclannish enthusiasm of the ancient Scotch. 

As a rule, as is well known, engine-drivers are a very hardy 
race. Indeed, few delicate constitutions can hope to survive 
the long and severe course by which only the cleaner or 
laborer can attain the position of driver. I was told some 
years back — for things are changed a great deal for the better 
on most lines now — by a man who used to run for a company 
which was encouraging a mineral traffic— a long way, by the 
by, from London — that he has several times, while on his 
journey, woke, and found his fireman asleep. The change in 
tbe sound as the train ran through the station was sufficient 
to attract his practised ear ; but that he should have been 
knocked up was no miracle, as his dowu trip averaged seven- 
teen hours ; and without more time to spare than was re- 
quired to arrange the train, be had to come back the same 
jOuruey. 

Some of the men, as some of all classes will do, certainly 
abuse their fine constitutions. I have Known a man never dry 
or change his clothes, save on Sundays, all through a winter : 
throw his soaked and dripping garments on a chair when he 
came in tired aud went to bed, and put the same articles on 
when he rose, though they clung to him with damp. He stood 
this, and lives still ; but for one who braves this danger 
with impuuity, a host may sink. Consumption on our rail- 
ways, as everywhere else, claiuis its lull proportion of victims. 

I have alluded to a driver s cooluess and resolutiou in uti 
accident, but no chronicle ever has or ever will be written 
which will tell one tithe of the accidents which i,he courage 
aud presence of mind of these m m have averted. A railway 
rau over a river— iudeed, it might be called an arm of the sea : 
as it was the inlet to an importaut harbor, provision was 
obliged to be made for the shipping, and so the piece of line, 
which crossed the water, at a heignt of seventy leet, was, in 
fact, a bridge, which swung rouud when large vessels had to 
pass. 1 need hardly say that such a point was carefully 
guarded. At each end, at a fitting distance. a man was placed 
specially to indicate whether the bridge was open or shut. 
One day, as tbe express was tearing along on its up journey, 
the driver received the usual "all right" signal; but to his 
horror, on coming in full sight of the bridge, he found it wide 
open, and a gulf of fatal depth yawning before bim. He 
sounded his brake-whistle, that deep toned scream which sig- 
nals the guard, aud he and his fireman held on, as before de- 
scribed, to the brake and regulato.-. Tbe speed of the train 
was, of course, checked ; but so short was the interval, so 
great had been the impetus, that it seemed almost impossible 
to prevent the whole train from going over into the chasm. 
Had the rails been in the least degree slippery, any of the 
brakes out of order, or the driver less determined, there would 
then have occurred the most fearful railway accident ever 
known in England ; but by dint of quick decisiou and cool 
courage, the danger was averted ; the train was brought to a 
standstill when the buffers of the engine absolutely and liter- 



ally overhung the chasm. Three yards more, and a diflerent 
result might have had to be chronicled. 

Some of my readers may remember an incident in railway 
history which dates back to our first great Exibition. I men- 
tion it here for its singularity, and lor my having kuown the 
driver whose coolness was«o marked. In ascending a very 
long gradient, the bindermost carriages of the train snapped 
their couplings when at the top ; the engine rattled on with the 
remainder, while these ran down the slope, whicn was several 
miles in length, with a velocity which of course increased every 
moment. To make matters worse, the next train on the same 
line was comparatively close behind, and, in fact, shortly came 
in sight. The driver of this second train, a watchful and ex- 
perienced hand, saw the carriages rushing toward him, and 
divined that they were on the same line. If be coutinued 
steaming on, of course, in a couple of minutes he would come 
into direct collision with them, while, on the other band, if he 
ran back, the carriages would probably gather such way, that 
they would leap from the bank. So, with great presence of 
mind, and wonderful judgment of speed, he ran back at a pace 
not quite as fast as the carriages were approaching, so that 
eventually they overtook him, and struck his moving engine 
with a blow that was scarcely more preemptible than the jar 
usually communicated by coupling on a fresh carriage. When 
this was done, all tbe rest was easy ; he resumed bis down 
journey, aud pushed the frightened passeDgers salely before 
him until they reached their destination, where tbe officials, 
as may readily be supposed, were iu a state of frantic despair 
at tbe loss of half tbe train. 

These anecdotes could be multiplied to almost any extent, 
as could the gloomy, yet strangely fascinating record of acci- 
dents to tbe men. It is a common saying that steam is a 
mighty power, yet very few of those who repeat the saying re- 
flect for a moment bow mighty it is. It is difficult to under- 
stand how tremendous is the force, until you have seen some- 
thing of the mischief it can do. The best way to appreciate 
the might of steam is to look at a locomotive engine after an 
explosion. The weight of a first rate locomotive engine, with 
its tender, is between sixty and seventy tons, which simple 
fact speaks all that is necessary to be Baid as to its solidity 
and strength. It is always built of the very best materials ; 
it may not have occurred to the reader to observe, that, when 
an inquest is held or any kind of inquiry instituted consequent 
upon an engine accident, it never happens that the fault arises 
from the engine having been constructed of bad or eveD infer- 
ior material. Nor, and this is very curious, does an engine 
ever explode when in motion ; I have know many cases of ex- 
plosion, and they have always been while the engine is at rest. 

In spite of the censures so often, because so easily, launched 
at railway directors and managers, I do sincerely believe that 
every exertion and device which ingenuity and experience can 
suggest, is used to prevent accidents, and to insure the punct- 
ual working of trains. As railway carriages are very expen- 
sive things, and the cost of a first-rate engine is more than 
three thousand pounds, it can easily be understood how a 
slight collision, even with goods trains, for instance, which 
never even finds its way into print, may entail a really awful 
expense. This, however, is going a little beyond my theme ( 
relative to which, should any reader feel any curiosity, 1 should 
advise the cultivation of a little intimacy with some one of 
the mauy worthy fellows in the class of which 1 have written. 

English Clubs. — The last uumber of the Galignani's Mes- 
senger contains the followiug iu regard to admission into the 
popular London clubs : 

Club-land is just now much troubled and full of desultory 
turmoil, by reason of the number of candidates for admission 
svbo are unable to make their way witbiu its charmed confines 
The pressure from without and tbe resistance from within are 
much more vehement than those of the unenfrancised who 
wish for the suffrage, aud tbe now privileged minority wbo hes- 
itate as to the degree in which they would extend it. The 
"Carlton" was full loug ugo, and a "Juuior Carlton" is 
already beginning to rise opposite the old oue. To gain ad- 
mission to the " Athenaeum " you must speud half a lifetime 
iu the state of probation. The " Travelers " is practically in- 
accessible, partly owing to the fastidiousness of those who 
have the power to admit, but partly, also, to the physical im- 
possibility of affording room to more than a limited Dumber 
within circumscribed precincts. "Brooks'" maintains with 
Whig dignity its inflexible limitation to five hundred, which 
excludes of necessity scores of peers and commoners of undeni- 
able eligibility, but which precludes the annoyance and vexa- 
tion caused in less exclusive quarters by the putting up of 
numerous names for ballot practice, with the inevitable results 
in wounded and missing. There was last week a battue at tbe 
" Reform," six gentlemen out of eight were what ia called 
" peppered," an equal number having been blackballed the 
week before, and this for no other reason that can be intelligibly 
assigned than that the House is already too full, and that the 
beleaguered garrison do not choose to share the necessaries 
aud comforts of life with strangers, however individually like- 
able. 



The Californian. 



7 



GENIUS. 

T71AR oat at sea the sun was high, 

While veered the wiuii and flapped the sail ; 
We saw a snow-white butterfly 
Dancing before the litfull gale- 
Far out at sea. 

The little stranger who had lost 

His way, of peril nothing knew ; 
Settled awhile upon the mast, 

Then fluttered o'er the waters blue — 
Far out at sea. 

Above there gleamed the boundless sky, 
Beneath the boundless ocean sheen ; 

Between tuem danced the butterfly, 
The spirit-life in this vast scene — 
Far out at sea. 

Awnv he sped, with skimmering glee, 
Dim, indistinct, now seen, now gone; 

Night comes, with wind and rain, and he, 
No more shall dance before the suu — 
Far out at sea. 

He dies, unlike his mates I ween ; 

Perhaps not sooner nor worse crossed ; 
But he has felt and known and seen 

A larger life and hope, though lost — 
Far out at sea. 



TEMPUS FUGIT. 

ONE of the best stories we remember referring to a stolen 
watch comes from a French source. In the pit of the 
old Frenoh opera, one of the audience suddenly discovered 
that his watch was yone. The evening's entertainment had 
not commenced, and the owner of the property mounted a 
bench, stated the loss, which could not have occurred above 
two or three minutes, and begged those around him to remain 
perfectly quiet, as his watch struck the hours like a clock, and, 
it then being on the stroke of seven, the watch would speedily 
indicate into whose possession it had fallen. There was a 
dead silence ; but the eye of the proprietor detected an indi- 
vidual who was trying to edge away from the vicinity, and he 
immediately denounced the skulker as the thief. The latter 
was seized, and the watch was found upon him ; and as the 
owner quietly put it into his pocket, he remarked, " The watch 
does not strike the hours, but I thought my assertion that it 
did would enable me to strirke out the thief." 

" Does your watch go well ?" asked a bystander of the happy 
owner. 

" It both goes well and returns well," replied the latter. 
Either of the speakers may have remembered the old admon- 
itory picture which was republished some years ago of Death 
looking in at a watchmaker's shop, and holding out an hour 
glass, asking, "Do I go properly?" To which the mechan- 
ician tartly replies. " You are much too fast I" 

The differences of time have become more remarkable since 
the electric telegraph has had the transmission of messages. 
The American story is not a joke, which announced across the 
continent the accession of a young wife to the honors of 
motherhood. When the message was read, it was found liter- 
ally that she had had a son to-morrow. This might happen 
even in the more limited space of Great Britain. A similar 
message flashed along the line, let us say five minutes after 
twelve on a Sunday morning, from Glasgow or Inverness to 
Plymouth, would reach the latter place at about three-quar- 
ters past eleven on Sunday night ; the reason, of course, being 
that at the first two places time is about seventeen minutes 
earlier than it is at the last. For the same reason, the new 
year begins at Liverpool about eleven minutes before it does 
at Bristol. Anyone who has crossed in the Irish mail packets 
between Holyhead and old Dunleary , as the place was prop- 
erly called before flunkeyism christened it Kingston, will re- 
member that English time is half an hour befor Irish time. 
By forgetting this fact an Irish gentleman once lost his pas- 
sage ; and by being reminded of it he lost his patience and 
found a grievance. 

" English time half a'n hour before Irish time !" he exclaimed. 
" And do you call thai justice to Ireland ?" 

The unreasonable patriot was as confused on the process of 
time, as if he had been calculating it by the Dutch clock in 
" Christopher Tadpole," which " pointed to twenty minutes 
to three, and struck eleven — the combination siguifying that 
it was eight percisely, after the dissolute manner of Dutch 
clocks in general." These Dutch instruments had certainly a 
great disregard for the divisions of time. That sixty seconds 
made a minute, or that sixty minutes made an hour, they 
agreed or disagreed with, according to caprice and circumstan- 
ces. And it must be said for them that they were not alto- 
gether unreasonable in their capriciousness. 

The ordinary idea that sixty minutes make an hour will not 
hold good in all countries. At the period of the summer sol- 
stice in Rome the day is fifteen hours and six minutes in length, 
and each hour of the day is really seventy-five minutes long. 
The night, on the other hand, is actually eight hours and fifty- 
four minutes Ions, and each hour consists of forty-four min- 
utes. This is difficult of comprehension to those only who 
are ignorant of the Italian method of computation of time in 
the convents, in and about Rome, where the old ecclesiastical 
fashion survives of dividing the day, from dawn to dewy eve. 
or dark, into twelve equal parts, and subjecting the night, 
from dark to dawn, to the same division. This method is cum- 
bersome, blundering, varying and inconvenient ; all of which 
constitute very good reasons for its being retained in that es- 
pecial locality where little is left of the other world but its er- 
rors, vices, pretensions, and superstitions. 



THE BOWERY THEATER. 

ITS ASSOCIATIONS — TOM HAMBLIN — HIS PERSONAL APPEARANCE 

AND CHARACTER — MRS. SHAW SHAKSPEARE AT THE BOWERY 

JOHN SCOTT — PANTOMIMES. 

WE have but one really old (heater in New York, and 
that is the well-known Bowery. Niblo's is an old in- 
stitution, but the building itself is not more than twenty years 
old. Wallack's, the Broadway, (better known as Wallack's 
old theater) the Olympic, the Academy, the New York, the 
French, are all new and almost without associations. But the 
Bowery has its history, and once boldly rivalled, in its aspira- 
tions at least, the sedate and- aristocratic Park. Even when 
old Simpson of the latter establishment used to insist in print- 
ing at the top of his bills the simple word " Theater," thereby 
sublimely ignoring every other institution, the Bowery in its 
company and its occasional great names, challenged the atten- 
tion of the public. Malibran sang in it. Charles Kean 
acted in it. Forrest won on its boards many of his early 
laurels. Farren, the famous English comedian, made his bow 
to its audiences. It did not long maintain this position, how- 
ever, and after a time it became noted for its scenic pieces and 
the noisy character of bofh its acting and its audiences. That 
rowdyism which became almost synonymous with the word 
Bowery soon affected its reputation. 

To think of the old Bowery is to recall Tom Hamblin, who 
for so many years controlled its destinies. To men whose 
recollections are older than two decades, it is unnecessary to 
describe Hamblin, and to all others no mere description can 
adequately convey an impression of a style of man and style 
of acting now quite passed from the stage. Hamblin was the 
last of the Kembletonian school. He was Kembletonian in 
his stature, in his splendid Roman head, in his sonorous ut- 
terance, in his stately and grand manner, and in his asthma. 
He did not miss a point in the traditional characteristics of 
the great head of the school. There are no men now-adays 
built upon his model. His stature was large and imposing ; 
his head of the old long type ; his features massive, with a 
nose of the fine Roman cast ; his brow compact and small, 
and his head covered with a mass of clustering locks, thick 
and heavy, and falling down over the brow in picturesque pro- 
fusion. It was a head to pick out of ten thousand — not be- 
cause it was intellectual but because its type was thoroughly 
antique. The contrast between him and the modern white- 
browed, scant-haired, weak-featured, over refined small-voiced, 
narrow-chested generation is great indeed. Hamblin's physi- 
cal beauty, his stately and superb acting, his bold badness, his 
many wives and the romantic stories current in connection 
with them, all combined to make him the much talked about. 
No man's name ever pointed so many morals, or adorned so 
many tales. 

To recall Hamblin is to recall Mrs. Shaw — for by that name 
she was better known than by her husband's (Hamblin), it 
being quite uncertain when she rightfully lost the one and 
gained the other. Mrs. Shaw was a great favorite and a great 
beauty. Her figure was superb, and her face, though rather 
expressionless, was exceedingly beautiful. Her acting was 
powerful by a certain magnetic charm it possessed. Her de- 
livery was slow and studied, and she seemed to influence her 
hearers by a concentrated intensity, a sort of white heat pe- 
culiar to herself. She played Ion in defiant rivalry with 
Ellen Tree. The latter's rendition was pure, delicate and in- 
tellectual ; Mrs. Shaw's was mainly fascinating as the sensu- 
ous picture of a superbly tteautiful boy — a modern Adonis 
that drove both men and women wild. 

The Bowery stage is large, and offers good scope for scenic 
pieces. Among its early successes in this way was " The 
Last Days of Pompeii," with Hamblin as the magnificent Ar % 
baces. At a somewhat later day Putnam and his wonderful 
ride down the break-neck declivity, offered grand delight for 
a whole year to the Bowery boj s :md girls. Some seventeen 
years ago a strong effort was made to revive the character of 
the Bowery performances. James W. Wallaok (Jr. then)- 
Lester Wallack, John Gilbert, lor a season or two offered the 
legitimate to only moderately appreciative audiences. The 
Bowery habitues, however, have always had a liking for Sbak- 
speare. When John Brougham some ten years ago undertook 
the management of this theater, an examination of the books 
for the preceding twenty years revealed the fact that, apart 
from a few long runs of sensational drama, Shakspeare had 
yielded the best returns, and " Macbeth " had been the favor- 
ite. After " Macbeth " came " Hamlet," Hamblin being con- 
sidered then, as Booth is now, the great Hamlet of the day. 
During the latter days of Hamblin's management, some twenty 
years ago, when his asthma allowed him to act but rarely, a 
great favorite, especially with the rougher part of the audi- 
ences, was John or Jack Scott. This actor had a fine physi- 
que and a most emphatic delivery. The passions were never 
so roughly handled by mortal before or since. He used to 
r-r-roll his r's in a style that would convulse the Bowery boys 
with wild delight. Intemperance killed him. 

These few reminiscenses had been awakened by a visit I 
paid to the Bowery a few nights ago, the first time for many 



years. The Bowery is on the east side of the town and quite 
removed from west-side people's ordinary journeys. The thea- 
tre is now under the management of Mr. C. L. Fox, who has 
exhibited a great deal of talent for pantomime, and whose 
" Little Boy Blue," etc., have attracted the attention of peo- 
ple not ordinarily counted among the Bowery patrons. I 
found, as I entered the theatre on the occasion of my visit, the 
company engaged in acting, as a preliminary to the pantomime, 
the old society farce " Perfection." I cannot commend the 
performance. The actors delivered their sentences in a cut 
and thrust style that war, or would be, horrible to ears polite.' 
The way actors of the Bowery generally have of tossing, 
churning, and worrying their sentences is utterly indescriba- 
ble. The audience, however, enjoyed " Perfection " with great 
relish, laughing and applauding everything that was said or 
done. The pantomime proved to be really good, Mr. Fox, who 
is manager, author, and actor, exhibiting no little talent in 
writing, producing, and acting plays of this character. The 
transf irmations and tricks were good, and the merriment they 
excited abundant. One could not complaiu of the conduct of 
the audience, which was noisy only in its good nature. There 
was a plentiful chewing of peanuts, eating of oranges, and 
munching of other edibles. Young gentlemen were rather 
prone to sit with their arms encircling the waists of the fair 
damsels who accompanied them, ana the damsels themselves, 
in no wise repelling this affectionate demonstration, coddled 
up closely to the sides of their protectors and seemed to en- 
oy the play all the better in consequence of their snug and 
agreeable positions. A sweetheart's waist to encircle, an 
orange for refreshment, and a good play to look at seemed to 
afford the warm-hearted beaux the extreme of felicity. It was 
quite amusing to notice how each good part of the play would 
be communicated to the fair companion by affectionate hugs. 
If the loud laughter that greeted the pantomime sometimes 
betrayed the empty mind, it also gave evidence of the simple 
heart and the ready disposition to be pleased. Altogether a 
visit to the Bowery is worth making. — New York Correspon- 
dent of the Boston Saturday Evening Gazette 

Cheese as Fcod. — Compared with other people, the Ame- 
ricans place but little value on cheese as an article of food. 
We use it as a condiment, sauce or side dish, rather than as 
necessary or proper food. In England, Scotland, Ireland. 
Wales, and in many parts of continental Europe, it is regarded 
as a common and sometimes a necessary article of food. There 
is reason why it should be so regarded. Its composition is 
very similar to that of flesh, the case in representing the mus- 
cular fibre, and the buttery matter the fat portion. Casien in 
an albuminous substance, useful in building up the mnscles, 
and the battery matter is a concentrated carbon as useful, in 
its way, for food, as fat meat. The Swiss chamois hunters take 
on their expeditions among the higher Alps, where they re- 
main sometimes for days together, exposed to intense cold and 
undergoing the hardest of exercise, only a small quantity of 
cheese and a flask of brandy. The English harvesters live on 
ale, cheese, bread, and occasionally a bit of mutton. The Ger- 
mans and Hollanders use cheese as a commou article of food. 
Cheese derives a factitious and market value from the dis- 
tricts in which it is produced. The Stilton cheese is a syn- 
onym of superior excellence to the English palate, and those 
who have made themselves acquainted with Teutonic tastes 
understand well what is meant by Limburger and Sweitzer 
kase. But for yeara past the American cheeses have been 
growing in favor, not only here, but in England. A late num- 
ber of the London Grocer says : " The Americans and Ca- 
nadians are emulating our most successful dairymen, and really 
choice American and Canadian cheese may now be obtained 
from those English importers who have made themselves well 
acquainted with the best sources of supply." If cheese could 
be afforded at a fair price as compared with meat, there is no 
reason why it should not become iu a measure, a substitute, 
as it seems to be especially adapted to restore the force ex- 
pended by those whose work is extra laborious and exhaus- 
tive ; and, indeed, it may be questioned, now, whether it is 
not as cheap, all things considered, as fresh meats. It 13 a 
subject worthy some consideration. 

Politeness in Business. — Politeness is a large addition to 
your capital already invested. It keeps your customers in a 
good humor, and gains new ones for you every day. It is the 
charm that smooths and softens the rough paths of business. 
It is the " philosopher's stone " which turns every hinge you 
touch into gold. It invests commercial life with the most of 
the poetry that adorns it. It makes men like you and love 
to deal with you. It gains you the kind words and good 
offices of those with whom you daily come in contact. It has 
been humorously and truly said by one that he preferred mak- 
ing his yearly bill with a polite merchant who would cheat him 
a Utile, than a rude, rough, and habitually impolite one who 
would honest him a great deal. Honesty and honor are com- 
mendable and shining qualities, it is true, but they never If ok 
better than when they are found in a setting of genuine polite- 
ness and good breeding. 

There is very little charity or benevolence in a deed if the 
doer thiuks there is a great deal 



8 



The California n . 



I 



NO TICS. 

The publication of "The OU-iroMIM " <"> Saturday 

mornings, and copies may he obtained in lite City at alt JSews 
»tanis,and of our News-agents through the country. It Kill also 
be sen— J by carrie" on the momma of publication. 

White & Bauer, News Dealers, No. 413 Washington street, are 
General A"ents for The Cat.iforman in the interior counties of 
this Stat" 'also, for the adjacent States and Territories. 

Ad kinds of JOB PRINTING done uith neatness and despatch 
at reasonable rates. 

£ f ' bowSaw." } mim ttnd 



THE CALIFORNIAN 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 1867. 



^Two good canvassers wanted. Apply at tut 

of The California* on Mouday, between 12 and 1. 



THE PROSPECTS OF THE CHURCH OF ROME. 

TO one measurably free from the prejudices of sect, and 
who surveys the history and the present position of the 
Romau Catholic Church from the stand-point of an indepen- 
dent and philosophical observer, it seems difficult to discover 
any sufficient grounds for the wide-spread and confident belief 
that exists even among' the better informed and thoughtful 
elasses outside of her communion, that Church is in a decadent 
condition, and is soon destined to lose the vast power which 
it has exercised in the world during more than fourteen cen- 
turies. 

It is almost equally difficult to comprehend how any intelli 
gent and liberal believer in Christianity, who wishes the in 
fluence of religion to be powerfully felt in society, literature, 
and politics, can regard the speedy overthrow or decay of the 
Church of Rome as a thing to be desired. 

So far as the prospect of such an event is concerned, we 
can discover nothing either in the latest aspect and tendencies 
of religious and philosophical thought, or in the present con- 
dition of society, or in recent political events in Europe, to 
make it seem probable. The fact that it at least holds its own 
in the most enlightened and highly civilized European com- 
munities, and in the great centers of learning, would seem to 
show in opposition to the popular Protestant notion that it 
cau exist aud flourish in an atmosphere of the ripest culture, 
end the brightest intelligence: the vast number of men.emi 
nent for high ability and profound scholarship, in England, 
France, and Germany, who are its earnest champions, nega- 
tives the idea that it can, in this progressive and sceptical age, 
command the honest allegiunce of none but the ignorant or the 
superstitious ; and its present condition and attitude in the 
United States prove with equal conclusiveness unsoundness the 
old-fashioned Protestant conviction that it must dwindle aud 
perish when brought into contact with tree institutions, public 
schools, an untramelled press, and the thousand influences ol 
American society that were deemed peculiarly hostile to su- 
perstition and piitstcraft. 

Those who have heretofore entertained these ideas, must 
have begun to perceive the necessity of reconsidering them, 
when they note the increasing influence of the Roman Catho- 
lic Church in a country where it receives no aid or counte- 
nance from the State, and where its doctrines and practices 
are amenable to the freest criticism and discussion. 

As to the effect upon the Church, likely to be producad by 
depriving the Pope of his stilus as a temporal prince, wo can 
see no reason for believing that it will be injurious to its power. 
It might indeed give an increased importance to the various 
national churches as bodies to a certain extent independent, 
and so assimilate their relations to each other to thoso that 
exist between the Episcopal Church in England and that in 
the United States ; but this would, it seems to U3, prove an 
additional sourco of strength, rather than an injury. 

If we come to the question of the desirableness of the 
speedy overthrow of Roman Catholicism, we must remember 
that there are many populous communities where it is the only 
form in which Christianity exists or has any hold upon the 
people. In Italy and Spain there is but one church, und that 
church is in those countries the only representative of Chris 
tianity. The same may be affirmed, though less broadly, of 
Austria and France. The overthrow of the Catholic Church in 
those countries would mean nothing less than the overthrow of 
religion iiself, and the inauguration of that low infidelity which 
is more detestable than the most distorted and corrupt forms 
that Romanism has ever assumed— such infidelity as in the 
days of the Cist French Revolution, caused even an infidel 
legislature to contemplate its manifestations with horror, and 
to seek the restoration of religious belief as the only means of 
saving the State from monarchy, aud society from utter de- 
moralization. When the alternative is between such infidelity 
as made the Parisian mob act at one time like beasts, and at 
soother like demons, and Romanism as it exists even in Spain 
cr South America, no candid believer in Christianity, however 
Htroag his Protestant prejudices, will long hesitate in his de- 
cision. No thoughtful student of history can deny that the 
Roman Catholic Church has done, and is still doing a great 
#nd good work in the world, however much his antagonism may 



be aroused by the unbounded assumption and the haughty in- 
tolerance that have been her most invariable characteristics. 
.Notwithstanding the consistent cruelty of her her system, and 
the logical arrogance of her pretentions, she is a great and 
powerful branch of the Church Universal, in whose downfall 
no enlightened Christian would exult however much he may 
deplore the abuses and corruptions which she has sanctioned. 

Such an event, therefore, we regard as one not to be rea- 
sonably anticipated lor at least many generation?, and not to be 
desired until the way is prepared and the foundation laid for 
some future Church, such as might, grow out of a union or 
eclecticism of all tho best elements of the Greek, Roman, and 
Protestant communions. The establishment of ecclesiasti- 
cal relations between the Episcopal Church and the Church 
of Russia, which has been advocated by Anglican divines, and 
was discussed at the last Episcopal General Convention, of 
the United States, may prove the first step in this direction. 
Meantime, we are very far from indulging any expectations that 
either this, or the next generation will witness the consunj 
mation of any such great eclectic scheme as is above alluded to. 



THE ALUMNI CELE3K A i ION. 

TnE Fourth Annual meeting -of the Associated Alumni 
of the Pacific coast took placo on the 5th iustant, ft 
Oakland. Tho Literary exercises on the occasion consisted 
of an oration, by the Rev. Dr. Stone, and a poem by Frank 
Bret Harte, Esq. The poem was something quite new, aud 
so far asour knowledge extends, entirely unprecedented in its 
kind, being a really true and artistic poein written for an 
anniversary occasion. If there is anything in the same line 
extant, we have not had the good fortune to meet with it 
The only suggestions that the most malicious criticism could 
originate in regard to it would be that it has no special ap- 
propriateness to an Alumni gathering, and that there are cer- 
tain reminiscenses of Longfellow's " Building of the Ship," 
distinguishable at times in the rhythm and metre. The social 
gathering in the evening passed off very pleasantly. Among the 
best of the speeches on the occasion, were that of W. H. L. 
Barnes, which opened very gracefully in a serious and pensive 
vein, with a backward glance at college reminiscences, aud 
closed in a strain of robust humor ; that of Mr. Bartk-tt.of the 
Bulletin, which was sensible, vigerous, and manly, and that 
of Professor Keeler, which was the neatest, the most artistic 
— and we suspect the most carefully prepared — of all. 



"Mark Twain" and Mr. Webb.- The Brooklyn Eagle 
thinks that Charles flenry Webb, and " Mark Twain," are 
one and the same person. In a late issue it has the follow- 
ing : 

" Slark Twain — Charles II. Webb— has been known on the 
Pacific coast for a number of years by his humorous, philoso- 
phical, and satirical contributions to the California press. 
His introduction to the reading public of the Atlantic .States 
occurred in the columns of the New York Times, through 
• Liffith Lank, " one of the cleverest travesties that has ap- 
peared in a long time." 

We are in doubt whether " Murk," or Mr. Webb will feel 
most Battered by this odd blunder. Both will, we suspect, be 
inclined to the opinion that the Eagle is not as well informed 
as it ought to be, in regard to the literary celebrities of the 
day. 

The New York Weekly Review makes favorable mention 
of a picture exhibited at the last exhibition of the National 
Academy of Design, called " On the Grand Canal, Venice," 
which if, we believe, the work of David D. Neal, a young Cal- 
ifornia artist, well known in this city. The Rtvieic says : " It 
is an indisputably fine painting of its class. It is a view taken 
from an open balcony or room looking over and upon the line 
of the canal. The landscape, or, more properly, the water- 
scape, is deliriously rendered with a sedulous finish which, if 
less artistic, might haply be Pre-Raphaelite. Nothing could 
well be more charming than the color, and if an exception be 
taken to the figures of the Venetian woman and child, it is 
simply that they are not equal iu their treatment to the rest 
of this most excellent work." 

Italian Opera. — The new season of Italian Opera will 
commence at the Academy of Music on Wednesday, June 
13th. The troupe r.i-.ve been assiduously rehearsing the fol- 
lowing operas during the present week: Fausl, Linda di 
Chamounix, Macbeth, and Rigoletto, as well as the famous 
opera of L'A/ricanine, and the opera of lone, which are new 
to Spii Francisco. This season promises to bo the most at 
tractive ever given in this city and subscriptions should come 
in rapidly. The box-sheet for subscribers' seats will be open 
every morning at 10 o'clock. On Mouday, the grand opera of 
lone will be rehearsed, the theatre being closed to the public 
for the occasion. The new season will open with the fine 
opera of Fausl. 

Both the New York Tribune and the Herald speak in very 
high terms of eulogy, of " Mark Twain's " lecture, at the 
Cooper Institute. The Herald declares thut " the mantle of 
' Artemus Ward ' has fallen upon ' Mark's ' shoulders," and 
the Tribune awards him a distinguished place among Ameri- 
can humorists. The lecture was on the Sandwich Islands, 
being the same delivered at the Academy of Music before the 
lecturer's departure for the East, and it seems to have proved 
a complete succesi 



I For the Californiari.] 
GLIMPSES OF BOHEMIA. 

BY AN OLD STAGER. 

A LUNCH AT "THE SHADES "—I • MAKE THE PERSONAL AC- 
QUAINTANCE OF MR C. COLCMBUS TOTTLF., OF THE " Sr.VDA* 
GLOBE," AND MR. HAMPDEN FLIGHTLEY, OF THE " WKEKi.t 

SCISSORS." 

MY friend's apparel consisted of a weil-worn black frock 
coat, threadbare in places, and particularly shiny about 
the cuffs aud collar, but carefully brushed ; un alpacca vest by 
no means new ; and trowsers of some cheap stuff for snmmer 
wear, all however, well made and fitting admirably. His 
boots, shirt, and cravat were unexceptionable ; und in spite of 
all deficiencies of detail, there was a certain unmistakable air 
of style and fashion about his appearance as a whole. 

Utterly unembarrassed by the meanness of his surroundings, 
he offered me the only chair the room contained and seated 
himself in one of the depressions in the demoralized lounge, 
saying : s 

" I never ask a visitor to occupy this luxurious article of 
furniture, unless he is an unwelcome one, or has learned by 
experience where he may locate himself safely. One must 
know where the springs are, or its duugerous. And now my 
dear boy, tell me what on earth has brought you to New 
York, and how you came to be away from the venerable Al- 
pha out of vacation time." Though I had sought him out for 
the express purpose of telling him what he now asked. I found 
myself unable to do it. A revulsion of feeling whirh I could 
not account for had suddenly come over me, and for the mo- 
ment I saw or suspected something of the monstrous folly ol 
my scheme. I told him that I had left college— but not why, 
and gave him to understand that I had come to the city for a 
week's recreation. 

After a few minutes' conversation referring mainly to mat- 
ters and persona connected with the college, my companion 
excused himself in order to " step out and learn the time of 
day." 

" My neighbor," he said, " the occupant of the next room 
is the wealthy proprietor of a wooden clock, which I have in 
vain endeavored to persnade him to put up iu the hall for the 
common benefit of the teuants of this floor, and I revenge 
myself for his meanness in refusing to do so, by going in to 
demand the time as often as I can make it convenient." 

Within a minute he returned. " It is lunch time," he said, 
" that is, it is what we used to call dinner-time at Schenec- 
tady ; and if yon retain a co'leee appetite, I have no doubt 
you can do justice to a mutton chop and a glass of beer." 
" Lunch," was a meal that I had never before heard of. At 

H , and also at Schenectady, even the most fashionable 

people breakfasted at from six to seven in Summer, and from 
seven to eight in Winter ; dined at twelve or one, and " took 
tea," (a meal consisting of bread and butter, cake, preserves, 
and tea, but with do meat's or cooked dishes,) at " candle- 
light." 

Locking his door, and depositing they ke in its place of 
concealment between the coal-box and the wall, my friend led 
the way down stairs, and drawing my arm through his, con- 
ducted me through Wall street to Broadway, crossed to the 
west side, and dived into a narrow street or alley leading to- 
ward the North River. After walking half a block, we reached 
a mean looking frarao building with the Dame " The Shades " 
over the door. 

This is an English institution," said Pike, " but inasmuch 
as they keep a superior article of ale, and the very best of 
chopB and steaks, besides being reasonable in the matter of 
charges, I waive the point of patriotism and generally take 
my lunch heie." Entering the street door, we found ourselves 
iu a narrow passage, aud turning to the right passed into a 
long room where a few persons were luuchiug, or drinking ale 
at small wooden tables, of which there was a row separated by 
short intervals, on each side of the apartment. The floor was 
sprinkled with fresh sawdust, and the wails were adorned with a 
variety of sportiug cuts, of famous pugilists, actors, race-horses, 
together with spirited and life-likeportraitsof celebrated terriers, 
some of whom had been victorious over other celebrated ter- 
riers iu matches for from fifty to five huudred dollars a side, and 
some of whom enjoyed an honorable fame in consequence of 
the number of rat9 they were recorded to have dispatched la 
sixty seconds. 

As we seated ourselves at one of the tables, a waiter rushed 
forward to take our order. It wa3 very evident that my friend 
was regarded as a person of no ordinary consequence in this 
establishment, and the deference shown him, went a great way 
toward neutralizing the impression mude upon my mind by 
the wretched and poverty-stricken appearance of his " office 
and lodgings." 

A thick-set man with a protruding mouth, and a nose the 
symmetry of which seemed to have been permanently impaired 
by some accident not of a very recent date, was sitting in a 
square closet or box behind a bar just long enough to occupy 
the v.idth of the door-way, where he drew the ale as it was 
ordered of the boy who waited on the customers. 



The Caiifornian. 



9 



We were scarcely seated when two young men entered the 
room, who saluted my companion in a somewhat boisterous 
fashion, and without an invitation drew a couple of chairs to 
the table occupied by us, which furnished but scanty accom- 
modations for four persons. Pike did not appear, as it 
seemed to me, to be particularly pleased at this unexpected 
accession to the company ; but seeming to place some con- 
straint upon himself, he performed the ceremony of introduc- 
ing me to them, as Mr. Tottle, and Mr. Flightley. The former 
gentleman, 1 think I should have had no difficulty in recog- 
nizing, from my friend s epistolary description. He was a 
brisk, alert, breezy-looking little man, of about five and twenty, 
with a peculiarly wide awake and complacent expression of 
countenance, and a carriage so erect and military as to sug- 
gest the notion that be was bent on making up by the dignity 
of his port, for his defective stature. Mr. Fliahtley, on the 
other hand, was tall and slender, with large dark eyes, an 
abundance of silky hair, and a mildly sentimental expression 
of countenance. 

•' Lunching, eh ?" said Mr. Tottle, as the attendant placed 
before us the mutton chops and the two " tobeys of ale " that 
Pike had ordered. " Flightley and I, just came round for a 
little chat over a glass of liquid refreshment ; breakfasted late, 
and won't waut any solids until dinner time. What shall it 
be Flightley, eh ? What do you say to a bottle of Scotch ale 
at joint expense — a Kentucky treat, eh ?" 

Mr. Flightley assented to this suggestion, remarking that 
he didn't approve of Kentucky treats as a general thing, or of 
that style of partnership arrangement on social and festive oc- 
casions, unless financial considerations rendered it an impera- 
tive necessity. It wasn't exactly the romantic style, but then 
what was a man to do when the state of his exchequer laid a 
veto upon the impulses of a convivial spirit ?" Accordingly 
the bottle of ale being brought, each of the two gentlemen 
produced a shilling, in payment of his half of the treat, and 
Mr. Tottle placed the two coins in the hand of the attendant- 

".By-the-by Pike," said the gentleman last named, after 
tossing off his first glass of ale, " the Majesty of Mango has 
promulgated an edict changiug the place of meeting for to- 
night, from the old Symposium to Rheinstein's cellar — you 
know the place — on Broome street not far from Mott." 

" Yob, I know the place" returned Pike, rather tartly, "and 
the lager too, which is new, yeasty, and detestable. What 
the deuce is the change for?" 

" Why, Rex says that the weather is too hot to drink lager, 
and I suspect he means to put us on sour ' Rhein wein' or 
' Berliner Weiss-bier' or some such trashy stuff during the 
heated term. He gives out that he has struck something par- 
ticularly rich in the way of a hot weather drink, at the Broome 
street cellar." 

" It's what I call a high-handed thing," grumbled Mr. 
Flightley with a solemn and injured air, " apiece of confounded 
tyranny. His encroachments' upon the Constitution have gone 
the length of establishing an absolute despotism. We have 
no law but his whims, and they are becoming more outrageous 
every day. 

"Ah!" exclaimed Mr. Tottle, with a counteuance expres- 
sive of thoughtful admiration, " he does carry things with a 
high hand. But then ho does i f , everywhere, and with every- 
body. I never knew such a man to have his own way. Why, 
he comes sauntering into our office just as if he owued it, and 
marches right into old Bullhead's sanctum when he's in such 
a mood that I'd rather go into the cage of the laughiug hyena 
at the Bowery Menagerie. There isn't a weekly paper in town, 
and not a great many dailies either, where he don't make him- 
self just as free as a Fifth Ward Statesman at a corner grocery 
on election day. What does he care for ' Private,' or ' No 
Admittance ' on a door? Why it only seems to provoke him, 
and in he's sure to march, just as old Pastebucket makes it a 
matter of religious principle to slap up a six-foot poster wher- 
ever he sees a notification to ' Post No Bills.' Its wonder- 
ful," resumed Mr. Tottle after a pause, during which he re- 
freshed himself with another glass of ale, " Its wonderful, and 
so far as I am concerned, I'm free to say I can't analyze it- 
I've sat for hours trying to analyze it, and I think I may, with- 
out vanity, lay claim to some analalyticnl faculty — at least I 
had credit for it at college, standing second in mathematics 
out of a class of sixty ; but really I've given it up long ago." 

"It's magnetism," said Mr. Flightley, looking very pro- 
found. " It's just personal magnetism — and that's the whole 
of it ;" having delivered himself of this oracular utterance, 
he recommenced drinking with a didactic air. 

Mr. Tottle, however, did not seem incliued to accept this 
off-hand solution of a problem that had so long baffled his 
analytical powers, and he rejoined, with some asperity : 

" O, that's your explanation is it ! Well, it may be satis- 
factory to you, but it will hardly satisfy anyone who likes to 
look into things. It's plausible enough ; but it isn't philoso- 
phical. It is easy enough to say ' personal magnetism,' but 
I'd like to be told , if it's quite convenient, what that personal 
magnetism consists of." 

" What does it consist of? 0, that's your difficulty is it ?" 
•aid Mr. Flightley, with an odd mixture of wisdom, sternness, 
and oondescension in his air, " Well, then, it consists in " 



Here the speaker suddenly slapped himself on the face, and 
pronounced an animated anathema upon an imaginary fly, 
after which he wiped his forehead with his handkerchief, trans- 
ferred the remaining contents of the bottle in which he aud 
his friend were jointly interested, to his own glass, and drank 
with much deliberation. 

Mr. Tottle was not so completely absorbed in any analytical 
process as not to observe this act of unequal appropriation, 
and there was something that savored of high moral disappro- 
bation in hi3 tone and manner, as he brought Mr. Flightley 
back to the point : 

" I believe you were going to inform me tvhat it consists 
of. I should like to hear, for I confess it's too much for me 
to make out without assistance." 

" Pshaw 1" interrupted Pike, impatiently, " there's nothing 
so mysterious about the matter. Grandin is a handsome, 
high-spirited young fellow, overflowing with talent and vitality, 
and possessing a fascinating address and a distinguished air. 
That's the whole secret of his ascendency over the vulgar." 

" Excuse me," said Mr. Tottle, with dignity. " Flightley 
was on the point of explaining, I believe. I should be pleased 
to hear his explanation." 

" Well now," returned the gentleman last named, " its most 
extraordinary ; but Pike has fairly taken the words out of my 
mouth. What I meant by magnetism — personal magnetism, 
is simply the overflow— the surplus — the superabundance — the 
exhuberance of vitality, and all that sort of thing, substantially 
as Pike has expressed it. Pike understands the thing pre- 
cisely as I do. And really, Tottle, you know you oughtn't 
to set a thing down as inscrutable, because you can't see into 
it." 

This concluding: observation was pronounced "offensive" 
by Tottle, and elicited from that gentleman a retort in kind, 
to which his adversary rejoined in the same vein of delicate 
sarcasm ; whereupon Mr. Tottle surrejoined with increasing 
bitterness, and the discussion was fast waxing hot and fierce, 
when Pike put an end to it by saying : 

" This won't do. It's personal, and comes under Article 
Five. Stop it ! Another word, and it will be bottled ale at 
the next meeting." 

These words produced a magical effect. Both disputants 
looked seriously frightened, and not without good reason, as 1 
afterward understood. 

" I'm sure I'm as much opposed to serious discussions in 
public places," said Mr. Tottle, in a deprecatory tone, "as any 
gentleman can be. It's in bad taste, and if there's any oue 
thing that I'm more opposed to than another, by instinct, ed- 
ucation, and temperament, that thing is bad taste. I'd rather 
violate the code of morality," continued the little man im- 
presssvely, and emphasizing his words by a blow of his fist 
upou the table — " I'd rather violate the code of morality, 
than the code of taste ; it's more gentlemanly. The former 
is only a sin, the latter is a vulgarity." Having given utter- 
ance to these exalted sentiments with an amazing fluency of 
speech, he shook hand3 with Mr. Flightley, and declared that 
he had meant nothing offensive in calling that gentleman " dog- 
matic;" dogmatism after all was merely one of the forms in which 
confidence in one's own convictions exhibited itself; it was 
often an attribute of the greatest intellects and associated 
with prodigious learning. Of all which Mr. Tottle proceeded 
to give numerous instances, including Dr. Johnson, Poison> 
and other famous men. 

Then Mr, Flightley, thoroughly appeased, declared that he. 
had meant nothing offensive, wheu he had called Mr. Tottle 
" voluble." Indeed the charge might generally be considered 
a compliment rather than otherwise. Yolubility was akin to 
eloquence, and it was often, used by the envious as a disparag- 
ing term for that ease and fluency of expression which they 
did not themselves possess. In fact, he, Mr. Flightley had 
been more than once so disparaged, by disputants who had 
found themselves unable to hold their own with him in dis- 
cussion. 

To say the truth, neither gent leman seemed to have much the 
advantage so far as the unfailing flow of words was concerned, 
the chief difference being that while Mr. Tottle's style of 
speech was like the rattle of rain-drops upon dry leaves in a 
brisk shower, or the continuous fire of squibs, Mr. Flightley's 
discourse flowed on in a steady monotone as unbroken and un- 
varied as the sound of water running from a spigot. The 
former liked to hear himself talk, and seemed to concern him- 
self little whether any one listened ; while the latter was jeal- 
ous of inattention and intolerant of interruption, eyeing his 
audience closely as he talked, and looking utterly disgusted 
whenever he detected a straying glance or a side remark. 

The reader will be able to judge how utterly unsophisti- 
cated, or how deficient in natural acuteness I must have been' 
when I state in all sincerity, that I was quite blind to anything 
comic or absurd in all this. On the contrary, I looked up to 
Messrs Tottle and Flightley as two decidedly superior liter- 
ary persons, and was impressed with a profound admiration 
both for their ability, and their amiability. 

Harmony having been restored, Mr. Tottle proposed that 
the company should adjourn to the " Rarebit " and " take a 
mug of ale all round " at his expense, adding as he glanced 



toward the empty " Tobies," that he " relished it better out of 
pewter." The " toby," it may be as well to explain, since I 
have never seen it except in certain old-fasbioned places, in 
the city of New York, is an earthern-ware mug holding about 
a pint, and having a handle and a lip like a pitcher. The side 
opposite the handle is distended like an alderman's stomach , 
and represents a grotesque countenance, expressive of the 
highest stage of convivial jollity. It was used only for Eng- 
lish ale, and was considered by moderate or inexperienced 
drinkers to hold enough for two persons. Th9 liquor was al- 
ways poured from the mug into small and slender glasses pre- 
paratory to drinking. 

" Nonsense !" returnedPike in answer to Mr. Tottle's pro- 
posal, smiling oddly as he spoke, " that notion about pewter 
is a mere fancy. We'll take it here, in the shape of two 
tobies, which will give us a couple of glasses apiece, and cost 
the same as four mugs of Alabany." So saying he rapped on 
the table to summon the attendant, whereupon Mr. Tottle 
manifesting symptoms of demoralizing alarm, hastily declared 
that he had another reason for his proposition to adjourn, be- 
sides his predilection for pewter, namely, that he enjoyed an 
established credit at the " Rarebit " upon which he designed 
to draw, not having at present, as he expressed it, "a copper 
about him." 

Pike, seeming by no means astonished at this revelation ol 
impecuniosity, ordered the two tobies, and fishing a couple of" 
six-pences from bis waistcoat pocket paid for the iiquor him- 
self. Thereupon Mr. Tottle whose spirits had seemed momen- 
tarily depressed, became himself again, and recommenced 
talking with great vivacity, sipping his ale at intervals with as 
much apparent gusto as though it were " out cf pewter." 

Mr. Flightley, meanwhile, appropriated one of the mugs to 
himself and me jointly, perceiving, perhaps, that I drank spar- 
ingly, and preferring me on that account as a partner. 

" Do you ever see my paper, the Scissors, Mr. Flicker ?" he 
inquired politely as he filled my glass and his own. [ ex- 
plained that I lived in the country, this being my first visit to 
the city, which might, I said, account for my never having 
heard of the journal referred to. 

" Indeed f said he, smiling with an expression of pity rather 
than of surprise. " Well, the fact is, we don't circulate much 
in the rural districts, and don't care to. What we play for, is 
a circulation among the cultivated and aristocratic classes. We 
leave the ' oi polloi' (Mr. Flightley pronounced the words with- 
out the aspirate.) to the Dredger and the Globe and that clasa 
of flash Sunday papers." 

This allusion to the two Sunday publications was uttered in 
a very low tone, and accompanied by a furtive glance at 
Pike and Tottle, who were engaged in an animated discussion, 
the question seeming to be whether one Gushliug ought to be 
expelled from the Mangoes for having " degraded the profes- 
sion " — such was Mr. Tottle's charge — " by doing the theatri- 
cals " on some weekly journal, at five shillings per week. 

" Yes sir," resumed my new acquaintance, upon noting the 
preoccupation of our companions, " we don't get up the 
Scissors with reference to the tastes of sewing girls, fire boys, 
and sporting characters. We have a small but select metro- 
politan circulation, among classes who would feel it necessary 
to make their ablutions with an extra-liberal use of soap, and 
to sprinkle themselves with eau de cologne, should they chance 
to take up such a journal as ." Here the speaker sud- 
denly paused, and, glancing up, I perceived that Mr. Tottle 
had his eye fixed upon him sternly, smiling a sardonic smile. 
Flightley had already perceived it, and swallowing a glass of 
ale, with great presence of mind concluded the sentence— "as 
the Venus Miscellany or the Police Gazette," 

" Ha! ha! ha!" laughed Mr. Tottle, "Ha! ha! ha!" 

" What's the matter with you, Tottle ?" asked Mr. Flightley, 
pouring the remaining contents of the toby into his glass. 
" Don't keep the joke to yourself pray." 

" If the courage of some people," returned Mr. Tottle sig- 
nificantly, " only equalled their superciliousness and malignity, 
" they'd speak out plain, and not swallow their words just be- 
tween their teeth and their lips. That's the joke Flightley. 
How do you like it," retorted Tottle glaring viciously at his 
friend. 

" I don't understand you," returned the other with dignity, 
" really I'm afraid that the tipple's too strong for yon." 

" 0 no, you don't understand me. Of course not," retorted 
Mr. Tottle, " well then, let me say that J understand you per- 
fectly, sir. And I'll take the liberty of telling you, sir, in the 
presence of witnesses, that /consider even the Venus Miscel- 
lany and the Police Gazette immeasurably superior to a paper 
that lives upon stealing— a paper, sir that depends more upon 
'• scissors " than brains ; that clips its matter from exchanges 
with a pair of shears, throws it in with a pitchfork, and pub- 
lishes it without credit. The Venus Miscellany and the Po- 
lice Gazette, have individuality and character of their own at 
least. They are distinctive ; they occupy a field, sir. Their 
matter is original. Can the same be said of the Weekly Sets 
sors ?" 

" Don't go too far, Tottle," said Mr. Flightley, emphasizing 
the caution with his fore-finger ; " don't presume too much 
upon old acquaintance and your diminutive stature, for there's 
a point you know where — " 

But the irascible Tottle anticipated his opponent, in reach- 
ing " the point where forbearance ceases to be a virtue." The 
allusion to his stature was scarcely out of Mr. Flightley's 
mouth, when he seized the toby, in which half a gloss of ale 
yet remained, and threw the contents into that gentleman's 
face. 

This gudden change in the manner of conducting the dis- 
cussion seemed to take Mr. Flightley entirely by surprise. 
For several seconds he sat regarding his adversary with a be- 
wildered air, the ale dripping from his beard upon his shirt- 
bosom. Then rising from his chair, he hoarsely articulated 
the words ; " We shall meet again," and stalked solemnly from 
the room. 



\ 



10 



The Califurnian. 



FENIAN FACTS. 

CiTT^ON'T drink that water, sir; it's full of Feeneens," 
1 J said the aged and feeble sextoness of our parish church 
to my little son, one sultry Sunday in August, 1865. " Fee- 
neens I" replied I. " Pray what on earth are Feeneens?" I 
poured out some of the condemned water into a tumbler. It 
was bright and clear, but swarmed with a multitude of black, 
wriggling, doubling, worm-like insects, darting to and fro in 
every hideous variety of form. " These, then, are Feeneens 1" 
said I. " Ugly creatures they are at best." 

Next day, looking at a stack of clover, I saw all round the 
base of the rick a layer of impalpable dust, of a light yellow 
color, like the pollen of flowers. " What is this ?" I inquired 
of James Fitzpatrick, the factotum who- managed my little 
farm. "That's the Feeneens," he answered; " they ate up 
all the good of the clover-seed, and lave that dirty stuff behind 
them.'' So I concluded that the word " Feeneens," or, as it 
is usually pronounced in Ireland, "Feenyeens," denoted a 
multitude of any ugly devouring creatures which destroyed 
what was intended for the use of man and beast. It has been 
supposed that the word is derived from some mythical Irish 
king called Fin, or Finn, or from a Celtic root signifying 
"chivalry" or "militia," but whenever I heard of the Fe- 
nians afterwards I could not help remembering the creatures 
who spoiled the bright water and my clover-stack. 

It was in August and September, 1865, that the existence 
of biped Fenians first became experimentally known to me. 
Afternoon services were held on Sundays in the parish church, 
at four p. M. These services were mach more largely and fash- 
ionably attended than those in the morning. A walk through 
the country lanes and by the fields, teeming with harvest, was 
delightful. The officers from a neighboring garrison seemed 
to think that an hour's sojourn in a pretty neatly furnished 
church gave a pleasant rest, if nothing more. The afternoon 
services were semi-choral, and the preacher, a clergyman of 
high collegiate reputation, thought he could say as much in fif- 
teen minutes as his hearers would be likely to retain. 

My way to the church lay through a long avenue, bordered 
with ornamental firs and flowering shrubs, all alive with sing- 
ing birds. The roadway then passed under and between two 
great sepulchral mounds or " barrows," supposed to have been 
raised by the Danes over dead warriors. A square patch of 
grass, darker in hue than the rest, indicated where an explo- 
ration had been made, and the country people told how deep 
within the mound the diggers reached a stone chamber, and 
saw for a moment a war-horse and his rider in armour, stiff 
and erect. While they looked upon the figures, they said, man 
and horse crumbled away, and all they found were plates of 
rusty armonr, broken fragments of golden ornaments, swords 
eaten away by time and damp, and dusty bones of the chief- 
tain and his charger. From these mounds the road is bor- 
dered with wild apple, hazel, and hawthorn trees. In spring 
the banks are blue with perfumed violets,-or yellow with 
primroses. The country girls and their sweethearts love to 
sit upon these mossy banks in summer evening, and plan the 
future of their lives. Down the hill a sudden turn leads to a 
long reach of roadway, and now the beautiful church spire 
gleams white above a thick grove of beech, and fir, and aged 
laurels. It was on this road, and amidst its peaceful scenery, 
I first fell in with the " Fenian men." 

On the third Sunday in August, 1865, passing as usual in 
my little pony-car under the barrows I spoke of, I observed 
far over my head, in strong relief, as fine a specimen of hu- 
manity as I ever saw. He stood perfectly motionless, looking 
intently down the long roadway. I bade the man, as usual, 
"the time of day," but met with no reply. This was curious, 
for the Irish peasantry are probably the most polite and cour- 
teous in the world. " He must be a stranger," thought I, and 
again hailed him. Suddenly glancing down upon me for a 
moment, the man lifted both hands above his head, ran three 
times round the summit of the barrow, and disappeared on the 
opposite side. I knew enough of the military system to be 
assured that the man was a scout or advanced picket, and that 
he had just signalled the presence of a stranger to others. 
Looking behind me, down in the valley, I perceived three 
dark bands of men, each band containing about sixty. Some 
twenty yards in front stood a single individual, facing the rest. 
There could be no doubt these men were at drill in that fern- 
clad hollow among the hills. Pursuing my way to church, 1 
suddenly, at the turn of the road, came upon a Fenian regi- 
ment, marching, I suppose, to join the men at drill. The 
scout had warned them, for they were partly breaking up from 
close order ; but it was plain they were divided into advanced 
guard, main body, and rear guard. They opened out without 
a word to let my pony pass, and fell in on each side of the 
railway, so as to prove to me they bad been at least partly 
drilled. They were dressed very comfortably and even neatly. 
All wore the American "pot hat," dark-grey cloth blouses, 
dark grey trousers, and all, without exception, were well shod. 
A finer or more healthy and cleanly looking body of young 
men no one could wish to see. They were just the material 
for soldiers. Evidently they were farmers' sons, or from the 



better class of laborers. Not one amoug them was over 
twenty-five years, or younger than eighteen. As I passed 
down between the double line, very slowly, anxious to recog- 
nise some face I knew, I saw they were all strangers from 
other parishes. There was not one of the residents in our 
own district amongst them, and it was subsequently discovered 
that the Fenians of one parish always marched and drilled in 
another. Here and there amongst them a hand would be 
doubtfully, and with some hesitation, moved to the hat, by 
way of salutation. One or two gave me the regular military 
salute. 1 touched my bat, and wished "good evening" to all, 
but they were not in a social mood. About the center of the 
line one carried a flag-pole, but no flag ; another strove to play 
an Irish jig upon a squeaking fife. There was not one of 
woman kind either amongst or following the company — a 
most unusual thing in Ireland. This was no meeting for a 
dance upon the short springy sheep shorn grass ; it was the 
" March of the Fenian men." 

From that time, until the seizure of the Irish Peopie news- 
paper, late in September, and the capture of James Stephens 
subsequently, a feeling of worrying and wearying uneasiness 
universally prevailed. People spoke loudly of " confidence' 1 
and " loyalty," but they sought for confirmation of this trust, 
and betrayed, unconsciously, their own apprehension. Drill- 
ing was constantly carried on, but never twice in the same 
place, and this proved how general and effective was the or- 
ganization. A signal fire kindled on one of the neighboring 
hills was answered from other hills in quick succession. These 
fires did not blaze out for more than teu or fifteen minutes, 
and probably were kindled with straw or furze. Fire baloons 
were now and then seen to rise from the distant coast and 
soar above the hills, then to flash out redly and disappear. 
We passed, on four successive evenings, through large bodies 
of men who made way for us silently, and gave no greeting- 
Now, however, they had with them a fiddler or a piper, or 
they flung a football into the air on the approach of strangers. 

No injury was committed on property, except that the 
young ash-trees were cut down and carried off, no one could 
find whither. We heard the dull thud of axes, and the sharp 
short crack of breaking timber in our own wood toward the 
early houre of morning. Our dogs often barked furiously at 
night, and when let loose limped home, lamed or otherwise 
injured. Twice we found straight branches of seasoned fir 
cut down and left behind — just the length for pike staves 
when barked and trimmed. 

No one knew whom to trust ; your gatekeeper or farm-ser- 
vant might be in the plot, biding his time, or giving informa- 
tion of your absence. It is now ascertained that the insur- 
gents knew what arms every gentleman possessed, and where 
he kept them. Cadgers, tramps, and beggars swarmed about 
the lodges and houses of the gentry. Pedlars, umbrellamend- 
ers, clock doctors, and itinerant musicians, all strangers, en- 
deavored to gain entrance to the farm-yards and kitchens un- 
observed by the owner of the mansion or his family. They 
had always stories of the American war to tell, and spoke of 
an American expedition to Ireland as a settled thing. They 
cleverly, and in the most artful way, inquired respecting the 
habits of the family and their friends. Scarcely a day passed 
without a visit from persons evidently Americans, with a horse 
and gig. They dashed up the avenue, and insisted upon ex- 
hibiting to the "ladies" of the household shawls, laces, pat- 
terns of clotli3, stuffs, and tweeds, as salvage from imaginary 
wreciss. While one engaged the attention of the inmates, the 
other examined the approaches to the house and out-offices. 
I detected one of these fellows sketching a plan of the rec- 
tory-house, a place memorable for the repulse of a rebel attack- 
in "'98." He had jotted down carefullv the bearings of a 
road through a defile, and under a " rath," or barrow, close 
to the house. Ladies feared to walk in their own grounds 
without male protection, and our dogs were admitted to pleas- 
ure gardens from which before they had been rigidly excluded. 
Strangers came in, we could not tell from whence or how — 
whether through hedges and over fences, or by the lodge gates 
with the connivance of the keeper. To lock the gates was 
no effectual means to keep them out. They seemed to Know 
all the "gaps" and "short cuts" about the farm. Occa- 
sionally the lodge people said they were threatened with vio- 
lence if they did not allow the tramps to pass. It was a time 
of vague f9ar and general insecurity. Several of our leading 
families left for Dublin or large towns, the gentleman return- 
ing to guard their homes or advise their tenantry. The con- 
stabulary patrolled the public roads, and passed through de- 
mesnes all the night through in bodies of six or eight or ten, 
but they could not be everywhere. The very precautions taken 
to prevent alarm created apprehension. Nothing of value 
was ever taken. The oats, wheat, hay, and potatoes remained 
safe and untouched in farm-yard or field. Yet every night 
there was an alarm, often, as it seemed, unfounded. One night 
we thought the hour of rising had actually come, for fires flared 
up here and there in our wood and plantation ; we heard the 
tramp of feet and voices of men. In the morning we were 
told "the bird-catchers were here last night," and kindled straw 
to daze and bewilder the wood guests." 



It might be true or false, for no one desired by minute in- 
quiries to show he distrusted those about him. But the rope 
which daily hauled up our Union Jack was cut and taken 
away, our young ash-trees were carried off, our dogs were mal- 
treated, and our cattle came galloping from the fields to the 
homestead in the dead of the night. This undecided worry 
continued until the latter end of October, when the police 
were making numerous arrests. The seizure of the Irish Peo- 
ple and the leading conspirators had baffled the plans for in- 
surrection. Drilling ceased, and we met no more of those 
bands of silent men, while our nights were passed without 
disturbance or alarm. But numbers of young men, laborers 
or farm-servants, suddenly disappeared. They had departed 
for America ; but how they obtained the passage-money I 
could not ascertain. Many a sorrowing mother has since come 
to me to " write a line" for her to her son at New York or 
Chicago, who seemed to have forgotton " her and the old 
home." In the autum of 1866, only two attempts were made, 
to our knowledge, to recommence drilling and marching. But 
the numbers present were greatly diminished, and the " Fe- 
nians " were plainly of the very lowest grade. The consta- 
bulary seemed to think that the danger was greater than in 
the preceding year, but we saw no reason to believe such was 
the case. We supposed that if a rising was really intended, 
it would take place when the harvest was gathered in, and be- 
fore the farmer sold his produce to pay his November gale. 

Nothing calculated to excite apprehension occurred ; the 
peasants pursued their usual avocations, there was almoBt a 
total cessation of tippling and drunkenness, and there was 
little or no crime. The people did not like to speak of the 
Fenians. The few whom you could draw out condemned and 
cursed them as robbers, who would pillage the poor farmers 
first, and who were under the ban of priest and minister. 

The autumn had passed away, and Christmas was at hand 
without a ripple of trouble on the surface of oar society, when 
suddenly we were shocked and alarmed by the discovery that 
we at least had been sleeping over a mine, and that a trusted 
man in my own service was suspected to be one of the chief 
leaders of rebellion. It was for him I sought in vain at Tal- 
laght. — All the Year Bound. 

Polar Bear. — The bears, wandering continually through 
the night, must needs have a hard struggle to live. During 
the summer the seals, which furnish their subsistence, crawl 
up on the ice, and are there easily caught ; but in the winter 
they are captured with difficulty. Driven to desperatiou by 
hunger, the bears will sometimes invade the haunts of men in 
search of the food which their quick sense has detected. I 
had an adveuture about this time, which shows that the Polar 
bear is not so ferocious as is generally supposed ; indeed, they 
have never been known to attack man, except when hotly pur- 
sued and driven to close quarters. Strolling one day along 
the shore, I was observing with much interest the effect of the 
recent spring tides upon the ice-foot, when, rounding a point 
of land, I suddenly found myself confronted in the faint 
moonlight by an enormous bear. He had just sprung down 
from the land ice, and was meeting me at a full trot. We 
caught sight of each other at the same instant. Being with- 
out a rifle or other means of defence. I wheeled suddenly to- 
ward the ship with, I fancy, much the same reflections about 
discretion and valor as those which crossed the mind of old 
Jack Falstaff when the Douglas set upon him ; but finding, 
after a few lengthy strides, that I was not gobbled np, I 
looked back over my shoulder, when, as much to my surprise 
as gratification. I saw the bear tearing away toward the open 
water with a celerity which left no doubt as to the state of bis 
mind. I suppose it would be difficult to determine which was 
the most frightened— the bear or I. — Dr. Hayes. 

An Excellent Thought. — Whenever we behold a tear, let 
our kindliest sympathies awake — let it have a sacred claim 
upon all that we can do to succor and comfort under affliction. 
What rivers of tears have flowu, excited by the crnel and per- 
verse ways of man ! War has spread its carnage and desola- 
tion, and the eyes of the widows and orphans have Deen suf- 
fused with tears. Intemperance has blighted the homes of 
millions, and weeping and wailing have been, incessant. A 
thousand other evils, which we may conquer, have given birth 
to tears enough to constitute a flood— a great tide of grief. 
Suppose we prize this little philosophy, and each one deter- 
mine never to excite a tear in another. Watching the eye as 
the telegraph of the mind within, let us observe it with anx- 
ious regard, and whenever we are moved to complaint by the 
existence of supposed or real wrongs, let the indication of the 
coming tear be held as a sacred truce to unkindly feeling, and 
our efforts be devoted to the substitui ion of smiles for tears. 

Our Augustan Age.«— The Mew York Citizen says : "The 
last half-century has been the brightest period of English fic- 
tion ; and when we recall the names of Browning, and Tenny- 
son, and Swinburne in poetry ; Whewell and McCoshin meta- 
physics, and Whately and Mill in logic and political economy, 
and a great company of other eminent men in the various 
paths of science, we are ready to pronounco the Victorian nge 
the most splendid era of English literature." 



The Californian. 



It 



JCilunebv and He.»d-Dressbs.— Mrs Winship lias just 
received, per last steamer, the latest Parisian Millinery 
Goods apd Laces for HEAD-DRESS, consisting in part of 
Breakfast Oaps, Point Application, Lace Vallenciumes, 
and the Widow's Roocue, worn by tbe crown heads 
of Europe, and tbe only first imported to the Pacific 
Coast. "Queen Emma, while here, replenished her 
wardrobe from the stock then and now on hand, at MRS. 
WINSHIP, No. 23 Post Street, un.ler the Mechanics' 
Institute. Through the influence of Queen Emma, Mrs. 
Wiuship has filled quite a number of orders for the 
foreign population of Honolulu. The ladies of San Fran- 
eisco should call and examine these beautiful Goods, by 
which means they will secure the Latest Fashionable 
Styles. 



What's the Matted?— In passing through Tnird street 
yesterday, we saw crowds of people entering a building 
a few doors below Market street, aDd we inquired of a 
passer-by what's the matter t He answered that they 
were going to have their pictures taken in the NEW YORK 
PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY, and the cause of the rush 
was that this took the best ana cheapest pictures in tbe 
city; tbe inducement must be much to draw so big a 
crowd from Montgomery and the other streets in the 
morthern part of the city. 



Mayes's Bazaab— R. Mayer offers at his Bazaar, corner 
Pine and Montgomery streets, tho greatest variety of jew- 
elry, watches, silver plated ware, guitars, music boxes; 
concertinas, accordeons, opera glasses, etc., etc., to the 
public of San Francisco, and to the country trade, at prices 
that defy competition, and Is determined to close out bis 
present stock at greatly reduced rates. His heavy case 
sliver watches frum tho American Watch CompaDy are 
superior to anything ever before offered to the public. 
These watches are taking the place of heavy gold watches' 
from the fact that the workmauship is superior, the cas- 
ings pure silver, and the prices low. The sale of these 
watches is very extensive ou the Paciflc coast. Another 
proof that American manufactures cau beat the world. 
The works are made of platiua and never get out of re- 
pair. French opera glasses of great power for sale or 
hire, and all kinds of musical instruments, eight day fam- 
ily clocks, etc. This is a rare chance to invest your mouey 
to advantage, at Mayer's Bazaar, southeast corner of 
Montgomery and Pine streets. 

N. B. — An immense assortment of Japanese curiosities 
for sale. 



WAGONS. 



MILLS & EVANS, IMPORTERS OF THOROUGH-BRACE 
Wagons, light express, two and three spring Wagons, 
suitable for milk-men and furniture dealers, and others 
wishing light and durable Wagons. Their Wagons are 
made expressly for the California market, and Mills & 
Evans' is the only firm which receives Wagons from the 
celebrated maaufai tory of A. W. Sanborn & Co., Man- 
chester, N. H. This latter lirm stands A No. 1 iu the 
east, and their wagons have stood tbe test of our Califor- 
nia climate, aud are sold by Mills & Evaus fifty per cent, 
lower than any other establishment ou the Pacific coast. 
Call and examine their Wagons, at No. 587 Market street, 
opposite the MetroDolitan market. * 



Medical. — "You.no Man's Fbiend and Pkotectob," an 
Association for beneficent objects, Young men should 
inform themselves in relation to it, aud by applying to, 
tho Actuabv, Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple, Post streot, 
they wiil be furnished with Prospectus. 



aS- WONDERFUL BUT TRUE.— MADAME REM1NG- 
ton, the world-renowned Astrologistand Somnambulistic 
Clairvoyant, while in a clairvoyant state, delineates the 
very features of the person you are to marry, and by 
the aid of an instrument of intense power, known as 
the Psycbomotrope, guarantees to produca a perfect and 
life like picture of the luture husband or wiie of the 
applicant, with date of marriage, occupation, leading 
traits of character, etc. This is no imposition, as testi- 
monials without number can assert. By stating place 
of btrth, age, disposition, color of eyes and hair, and en- 
closing lilty cents and stamped envelope addressed to 
yourself, you will receive the picture by return mail, 
together with desired information. 

Address in confidence, Mamamk Gebtbude Remington, 
P. 0. Box 297, West Troy, N. Y. 



MEDICAL ADVICE. 
Dr. Wm. K. Dohektv's Medical and Surgicai 
Institute is becoming; a sine qua non to the welfare 
of our State and health of our citizens ; and bis 
rapidly spreadiug reputation, although it may excite 
surprise, is but tbe sigual of skill, aud follows as the 
natural effect of such a cause. W« are personally 
acquainted with gentlemen who bad suffered for 
years under chronic disease, and who had taken ad- 
vantage of every available means that promised 
relief, but without success, until they called upon 
Dr. Doherty, who, iu an incredibly short space of 
time, has given them eutire relief. It is gratify ini 
to announce this fact, because tbe Doctor is a gentle- 
man who seeks, not by defamation of others, to es- 
tablish his reputation, or to rear the superstructure of 
his own upon the ruin of another's fame. The Doc- 
tor conducts bis Institute iu a mauuer that must be 
gratifying to all his patients. He examines, hears, 
advises, aud recommends, without charge, aud the 
patient, after hearing his terms for treatment, can 
accept or reject at pleasure. In no case does the 
Doctor make a charge unless he effects a cure. This 
be is able to do, because he feels the conlidetrce 
which long experience has given, and no doubt the 
consolation which appertains to that confidence. 
Persons afflicted with either acute or chronic disease, 
would do well to consult the Doctor ; at all events, 
it can do no harm, as for consultation he asks no fee ; 
nor does he insist on obedience to his advice unlees 
the patient places himself under his care. His offices 
are on Sacramento street, opposite the Pacific Mail 
Steamship office. — San Francisco News. 



^JANTY & WAGNER, 

(8UCCESS0RS TO J. REGAN,) 

113 Montgomery street, bet. Bush and Sutter 

N B — All candies sold by us are warranted to be man- 
factured from Stewart's double rcDned Sugar, aud to be 
equal to any manufactured in the state. Country mer- 
chants solicited to examine our stock and prises. Goods 
delivered to auy part of tbe city free of charge. 



MEKICAN HOTEL, 
L Main street. . - - Fctalutna. 

EMERSON * I.AMBKRTON, Proprietors 



Adams, Dentist, 423 Mont e 



ornery 



TOWNE & BACON, 
Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 
Than other offices 
mg 4^ jfflBjTn this City, 

536j: t th ,T 

^Lr%r^Lr With a Job, . 

And you will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their office is at 536 
Clay St., below Montgom'y, 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 



OYS! BCTSS! BOYS! 

NOW IS THE TIME 
H. M. LOCKWOOD & CO., 
New No. 624) CLAY STREET, (Old No 

Have received a Large Stock of 

GENTS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

— AND — 

FURNISHING GOODS, 
Which they are selling 

AT VERY LOW PRICES. 
Every Garment warranted. All are invited to call 
examine our goods. 

H. M. LOCKWOOD & CO. 

624 Clay street, San Francisco 



Edward Bosqui & Co., 

Printers, 

And Blank Book Manufacturers, 
517 CLAY STREET, 

Between Montgomery and Sansome Sts., 
San Francisco. 



gTERETT & CvJBEEY, 

PRINTERS, 

533 Clay street, San Francisco. 

B. F. STERETT WM. M. CUBERY 

We are prepared to execute in a prompt and satisfac- 
tory manner, all kinds of Book, Job and Card Printing ; 
also, 'Blank Books manufactured aud Paper Ruled to 
order. 



pOR POSTERS, HANDBILLS, 

AND 

Show Work of All Kinds, 

GO TO THE 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING HO USE 

OF 

FRANCIS & VALENTINE, 
517 Clay streot, and 510, 512 and 514 Commercial street- 



J} 0 YOU WANT ANY 

P R IN TING? 

IF YOU DO, GO TO 

411 CLAY STREET, 

BETWEEN SANSOME AND BATTERY. 



Printing of every description done on 

short notice and in tbe best style, by 

M. D. CARR & CO. 



San Francisco Mill. 



HOBBS, GILMORE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

BOXES, 

Market Street, hetween Beale and Main, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



For Sale, Mahogany, Spanish Cedar, and other Fancy 
Woods. 



P. A. MACDONALD 
J. H. MACDONALD 



;} H 

D. A. MACDONALD & CO. 



MCGILL, 
CHIPMAN. 



SAWING AND PLANING MILLS, 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
DOORS, SASHES, BLINDS AND MOULDINGS, 

Corner o f Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Finishing Work for Buildings constantly on hand, 
and got up to order. 



W. N, MH.LEB J. F. UALKY. 

jyjILLER & HALEY, 

EMPIRE STEAM MILLS, 

NO. 29 FREMONT STREET, 
San Francisco. 
SASH, BLIND, DOOR AND MOULDING FACTORY. 




RADICAL CURE TRUSSES ! 

LADIES' SUPPORTERS 
Shoulder Braces, etc., 

ITTKD, AND RELIEF WARRANTED 



GEORGE TIEMAN'S & C O.'S 

NEW YORK BRANCH 
Surgical and Dental Instrument Depot, 
No. 218 MONTGOMERY STREET, S.in Francisco, Cal., 
(Opposite the Russ' House,) - 

J. H. A. FOLKERS. Sole Agent. 
Also keeps Ear Trumpets lor the Deaf, Elastic Stockings 
for Enlarged Veins, etc., Baunseheidt's Rheumatism In- 
strument, Magentic Electro Machines , etc- 



P 



ION EER IRON SHUTTER WORKS. 
Established 1849. 



M 



AliTlN'S RESTAURANT, 

623 COMMERCIAL STREET 

Above Montgomery. Med? at all hours. 
The best of Wines, Oysters, Game, aud all 
the delicacies of tbe season always on hand v 

Private Saloons up stairs for Dinner and* . - 

Supper Parties. LEON DING EON, Proprietor. 



Q A/L I F O R M LA 

COFFEE AND DINING SALOON, ] 
(Formerly tho German Coffee Saloon,) 1 ; 

NOS. 612 AND 614 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Between Clay and Merchant, San Francisco. 
J. R. REAGAN Proprietor 

This house has undergone a thorough change, both in 
MANAGEMENT and PRICES. A flDe Ladies' Saloon has 
been fltted up iu the rear, where private parties can re- 
ceive every attention in Ihe mo-t comfortable quarters. 
We also keep lunch hot on dialing dishes at the counter, 
including the finest of Pastry, where customers c»n be 
served quickly and satisfactorily. 

French Breakfasts and Dinners, with Wine, continued 



BONZI & CO., 

Italian Restaurant, 

615 Merchant street, opposite Washington Market , between 
Montgomery and Sansome streets, San Francisco. 

MEALS, WITH WINE, 50 CENTS. 

THE CHOICEST COMMODITIES OF THE 
Market served up in the best style of Italian 
and French cookery. 

Ou the second floor are numerous private 

rooms, for social or private DINNER PARTIES, 
o'hocolate, Wine, Beer, Liqueurs, with every description 
of edible accompaniments, served to order at any hour of 
the day or evening. 



JJBMOTED 

To 645 Clay street, a few doors below Kearny. 



DR. BLAKE CAN NOW BE FOUND AT 
I the above location . Engagements as usual 
f can be made with all those w ho desire thor- 



ough ami FIRST-CLASS GOLD FILIINGS. 



Lamott's Hat Emporium 

... IS THE PLACE TO GET A FASHIONABLE 

HAT OR CAP, 

AND AT PRICES 25 PER CENT. LESS THAN 
ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THIS CITY. 

Do not fail to have one of 

LAMOTT'S HATS! 

CORNER PINE AND MONTGOMERY STREETS. 



■yy ALTER S. PIERCE 



Manufacturer and Importer of 

PIANO-FORTES. 



FACTORY AND WAKEROOM, NO. 536 MARKET 
Street, opposite Second. 

PIANOS TO RENT.-^ft 

WALTER S. PIERCE'S 

Piano Ma n u factory 

Is the most complete on the Pacific Coast, havin g every 
appliance of machinery for Making or REPAIRING Piauos 
to be found in the largest Eastern Factories 

Old Pianos converted into new, by putting in new inte- 
rior mechanism complete. 




THE FAMOUS 

P I A iN O S' 



John Upstone, 

MANUFACTURER OF FIKE-FHOOF 

Boors and Shutters, 

Bank Vaults, Balconies, Gratings, Prison Cells, 
Awnings, Stairs, Iron Fence, etc., 

Corner, of California and Drumm Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Constantly on hand a largo assortment of second 
hand Fire-Prooi Doors and Shutters. 



Chickering & Son 

Have received the endorsement of all the leading Artistes 
of Europe and America. Testimonials to be seen at tbe 
Agen's'. 

Piauos to rent, from $5 to $10. Tuning free. 

KOHLER, CHASE & CO., 

421 Montgomery street 



I. 



H. SMALL, 

Machine Shop 

BUILDER OF 



Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, 
Also, I. H. Small's Patent Boot Screwing Machine. 
Gears of all kinds Cut at Short Notice, 
And at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
Repairing of all kinds done w ith Promptness and Dispatch. 
Comer of Market aDd Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



PENDEBGAST. 
HAHSCOM. 



u.s.s~-}HANSCOM & CO 

Etna Iron Works! 

S. E. corner Fremont aud Tehama Streets, San Francisco, 

Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QUARTZ-MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, SAW- 
MILLS, FLOUR-MILLS, 
Dunbar's Improved Self- Adjusting 
PISTON PACKING, 
Now so extensively used iu the East aud in this State 
Requires no i-priugs or screws; is always sieam-tight; 
without excessive iriction, and never gels slack or leaky 

HANSCOM'S CRUSHER, 

The best of tbe kind now In use In this State or anywhere 
else. All kinds of GRINDERS and AMALGAMATORS 
made to order. Manufacture! s of the new Prospecting 
Quartz-Mills, consisting of Boiler, Eugine, 2-stamp Bat- 
tery and Grinding aud Amalgamating Pan, complete, for 
working from one ton per oay upwards. Drawings are 
furnished with each of these mills, so that any competent 
engineer cau set it up iu runmug order in two days' time. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER-WHEEL, 
GiviDg greater power at lower cost than any wheel in use. 

Send lor one of our circulars giving full tables. 

All Wheels warranted to give the Power as set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

SOLE MAKERS FOR THIS COAST OF THE " PENDEB- 
GAST WHITE IRON STAMP rHOES AND DIES." 
None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 
at market prices. Particular attention given to drawings 
and specifications of machinery, wnich will he made to 
order. The patronage ol the public is respectfully solicited. 

Particular atteutiou paid to HOUSE WORK and 
ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS. 



rpHE CALIFORNIA 

Building and Savings Bank, 

CALIFORNIA ST., ONE DOOR FROM SANSOME. 
Capital and Deposits, .... - $600,000 

WHICH IS LOANED ON PROPERTY. 

LOANS MADE od CITY REAL ESTATE, 
HOUSES, SHIPS, FACTORIES 
AND MERCHANDISE. 

Deposits received at one per cent, per month. 

M"ney transmitted from the interior, by Express or 
Mail, passed to interest from the day ol arrival, and a 
Cerliucate returned in course of post. 

Strangers may deposit Bonds, Gold Dust, Coin, or Valu- 
able Papers in the Vault, for long or short periods, at a 
small rei t, lor which valuables the Compan" will be 
accountable, THOMAS MOONEY, President. 



£JROOKLYN HOTEL, 

1852. SAN FRANCISCO. 1866. 

Tbe Proprietor of the above-named Hotel wishes 
to inlorm his patrons and the Travelling Public that he 
has opened that elegant Brick Fireproof Hotel, on the 

S. E. Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, 

With all the modern conveniences attached to it. 

Gas and water are supplied throughout the House. The 
Rooms arc well ventilated, and the Public will find in this 
Hotel all the comforts of a home. The Hotel is spacious, 
aud well adapted for the use of Families. Suits of Rooms 
can be had on reasonable terms. 

A Large Reading Room is attached to tbe Hotel, 

Containing 500 Volumes of Standard Works, 

Which is entirely for the use or patrons. 
THE CITY COACH, with the name of the Hotel on it, 
will be in readiness at the Wharf , on tbe arrival of each 
gteamer, to convey passenirers »nd baggage to the Hotel, 
free of charge. JOHN KELLY, Jr., Proprietor. 



TPM. 0. BREYFOGLE. 

(Successor to WARE & MOSHER.) 
NO. 26 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
Manufacturer and Dealer in 

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS & SHUTTERS, 

From Kiln-Dried Lumber— at tho Lowest Rates. 
Orders from tbe country will roccive prompt attenlion 



OWMAN & CO., 

Doalcrs in Stoves and Tin Ware, 

Main street, Petaluma. 



The Calilornian. 



RA.REY AXD THE JACKASSES. 

John Rarey, the horse tamer, while he was 
in Rome, wa9 terribly annoyed, as strangers 
always are, by the indescribable braying of the 
jackasses, which, coining to the market early 
iu the morning with vegetables, always improve 
the hour when strangers are enjoying the half- 
dozing daylight which immediately precedes 
the pain of getting up, to bray with special 
vehemence, singly and in chorus. No one 
who has not suffered it can appreciate the 
brickbat-rubbing, saw-filing effect of it on the 
strongest nerves. Rarey could not stand it — 
and he swore he wouldn't. He watched the 
awful little beasts with a professional keenness 
sharpened by personal pain, to see if there was 
any practicable way to stop their braying with- 
out cutting their throats, but almost resolved 
to do that, if there was no other remedy. He 
soon noticed that the animal invariably 
straightened its tail out ss stiff as a poker 
when the eruction commenced, and he darted 
with rapidity of genius to the conclusion that 
as the tail and the bray went together, the 
bray couldn't go without the tail ; so he de- 
termined to hold the tail down. He tied a 
number of heavy lava paving stones to stout 
strings, with slip-knots on the ends, and while 
the owners were enjoying their " cafe latta " 
at some neighboring " cafe," he slipped the 
nooses over the unsuspicious tails, and retired 
to watch the result. In a few minutes an es- 
pecially noisy jackass was seen to open his 
mouth and gasp convulsively. He stood gap- 
ing for three or four seconds. He wheezed, 
and the lava block swung suddenly to the 
braying level. But no souud came. He 
looked plaintively round to his companions, 
as if to ask them what ailed him. His lips 
shook, and he dropped the artichoke leaves he 
had been munching, as the idea entered his 
superstitions fancy that the devil had somehow 
got out of the bogs into him. Another tried, 
but an inarticulate grunt was all that he could 
reach. They all tried a chorus which had only 
the 9ame morning rattled and crashed through 
every street and lane, but in vain. There was 
Bilence that day in the " Strangers' Quarter," 
and rejoiciDg in every piano from the Piazza 
del Popolo to the Piazza d'Espagna. 

Dubbs, the speculator, met Stubbs, the real 
estate broker in the street, one windy, dusty, 
March day, and, hailing Stubbs, asked him 
how real estate was. " Well," said Stubbs, 
taking off his spectacles and wiping the dust 
out of his eyes, '■ real estate is very active to- 
day, Mr. Dubbs ; every one I see has a spec 
in his eye." 

Does the court understand you to say. Mr. 
Jones, that yon saw the editor of the Augur 
of Freedom intoxicated ?" 

" Not at all, sir. 1 merely said that I had 
seen him frequently so flurried in his mind that 
he would undertake to cut out copy with the 
snuffers — that's all." 

A short time since, two young ladies, well 
known, were holding high converse over the 
virtues of a certain new dress. " And does it 
fit well?" asked one. "Fit? as if I'd been 
melted and poured io." 

KiHtor of the California!!— Sir : Permit 

me to report to the public, through your columns, the 
•business operations of the BUILDERS' INSURANCE 
COMPANY, for May: 

Number or policies issued 1,070 

Average amount insured under each policy. ..$ $62 «9 

Average rate per cent 2 11 

Net amount ol premiums receive 1 19.4711 82 

Losses lor the munth 4.726 13 

Balance in favor of Company $H,753 69 

All of which, I trust, will be deemed satisfactory. 

THOMAS MOONEY, 
President Builders' Insurance Company. 
San Francisco, June 1, 1867. 



CENTRAL FAY CLUB. 



T 



HE ROOMS OF THE CENTRAL FAY 



Club, No. 1, 5 and 6, southeast corner of Pine and 
Montgomery streets. Special meeting evcrj' TUESDAY 
EVENING. Rooms open every evening for general 
consultation. 



THE GREAT 

New England Kemedy! 

Dr. J. W. POLAND'S 

White - Pine Compound, 

IS NOW OFFERED TO THE AFFLICTED THROUGH- 

out the country, after having been proved by the lest of 
eleven years in the New England Elates, where its merits 
have become as well known a? the tree from which, in 
part, it derives its virtues. 

THE WHITE-PINE COMPOUND CUKES : 
Sore Throat, Colds, Coughs, Diptheria, Bron- 
chitis, SpittiDg of Blood, and Pulmonary 
Affections generally. It is a remarkable 
Remedy for Kidney Complaints, Diabetes, 
Difficulty of Avoiding Urine, Bleeding from 
the Kidneys and Bladder, Gravel, and other 
Complaints. For Piles and Scervy it will 
be found very valuable. 
Give it a Trial, if you rrovld learn the 
value of a Good and Tried Medicine. 

It is pleasant, safe and sure. Said by all Druggists and 
Dealers in Me licine generally. 

HOSTETTER, SMITH & DEAN, 
401 and 403 Battery Street. Mr. Clay, San Franclfco 




MASOXIC TEMPLE, 

Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco. 
TO TnE SICK ! 

Cures Without Medicines. 

Experience or 25 years (loth (18(16) in San Francisco,! 
enables DR. BOURNE to Guarantee Cures I He performs 
all he promises — more, if possible. Consultations Free. 
Call or send for circulars. 

10 MASONIC TEMPLE, POST STREET. 



A . F I X T G A X 




NORFOLK STABLES, 

ELLIS STREET, BETWEEN POWELL AND MASoN, 

SAtf FRANCISCO. 

THE FINEST STABLE KNOWN IN AMERICA. 

Horse J, Buggies, and all kinds of Carriages to let on rea- 
sonable terms Particular attent ; on paid to bo >r ling 
horses. Ladies' and Gentlemen's Saddle Horses alwuvs 
on hand. P. A. FINIGAN, Proprietor. 



I)EDDIXG .AND FCRXITURE, 
J LIVE GEESE FEATHERS, 
DOWNV PULU, CURLED HAIR. MOSS, AND 
WOOL MATTRESSES. 

— AISO — 

The sole rich! to manufacture Fri tKB S Patfnt Shiim 
Spring Mattbesses, admitted by everybody to be the 
best, more durable, more elastic, and cheaper than the 
old style Spring Beds, f \ a in 

A full assortment of FfRxrrrRE, Sukkii.vg, Blankets, 
et<\, at extremely low prices, for rash. 

JACOB Sf'HREIBER, 
Nos.121 and 123 Saiisc-me street, between Bush and 
Pioc, Ci.n Francisco. 



^y. E - GOLDSMITH, 
Practical Card and Seal Engraver, 
AND PLATE PRINTER, 

No. 505 Montgomery street, over Tucker's. 



(fJAXTY k tVAGXER, 

(SUCCESSORS TO J. REGAN,) 

113 Montgomery street, bet. Bush and Sutter 

N B — All randies sold by OS are warrantod to be man- 
facturcd from Stewart's double refined Sugar, and to be 
equal to any manufactur e in theftato. Country mer- 
chants solicited to examine our stock and prises. Goods 
Call vsrtd to any part of the city free of charge, 



jy^OYNIHAN & AITKIN, 

Portland Boiler Works, 

811 AND 313 MISSION STREET, 

Between Beale and Fremont streets, San Francisco. 



Manufacturers of Steam Boilers, high or low pressure 

Cylinder, Tubular or Flue: Sheet Iron Work; steam and 
Water Pipe of tli<- best quality, unit at more reasonable 
prices than any other est ablisnmeut ou the Pa -ific Coast. 

Being Practical BoiPt Makers, of long experience, con- 
fiuing our whole time and attention to our branch of bus- 
iuet-s, aud having enlarged our works, and also added the 
most improved tools in the country, we are enabled to 
turn out Boilers more expeditiously than sny other estab- 
lishment on the Pacitlc Coast — using none but the best 
quality and branls of Boiler and Sheet Iron and Boiler 
Tubes. Those in want of anything in the above line will 
ilo well to give us a call. Orders from the countiy will 
receive prompt attention. 

All work warranted according to order. Partirulnr 
attention paid to Repairing Steam Boilers 



T. J. MOVNIHAN, I „ 
JAS. AITKEN, '} Proprietors. 



N 



EPTUXE IRON WORKS. 




Corner Mission and Fremont streets, San Francisco. 
MARfNE, LOCOMOTIVE AND ALL KINDS OF 

HIGH- PRESSURE STEAM BOILERS 

Manufactured. 

The proprietor Imports his own C. H. and li. Iron across 
the Isthmus, an I Tubes of every size. Other parties can 
never blockade the market. He has ma le arrangements 
with the best houses in the Kast to furnish him with 
everything in the shape of Iron he wants. 

All Boilers guaranteed and tested by U. P. Boiler In 
spector before they are sent out ol the shop, at my ex- 
pense. *3i-AU kin'ls of Sheet Irou and Water pjpe, Coal 
Oil stills, Wroueht Iron Worms, etc.," mauufu lured to 
order. OLD BOILERS RKPAIRF.R 

D. CAMEKOX. 



p 



ION EER IROX SHUTTER WORKS 
Established 1849. 



John Upstone, 

MANUFACTURER OF FIRE-PROOP 

Doors and Shutters, 

Bank Vaults, Balconies, Gratings, Prison Cells, 
Awnings, Stairs, Iron Fence, etc., 

Corner of California and Dmmm Streets, 
SAN FR AX CISCO. 

Constantly on hand a large assortment of second 

hand Fire Proof Doors and Shutters. 



I 



H. SMALL, 

i 

Machine Shop, 



BUILDER OF 
Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, 
Also, I. H. Small's Patent Boot Screwing Machine. 
Gears of all kinds Cnt at Sliort Notice, 
And at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
Repairing of all kinds done with Promptness and Dispatch. 

Corner of Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



DKnoAST. 
scon 



11. S. SMITH, JUAISftt UJl <V IU } w . w ,, IJlNf 

Etna Iron Works! 

S. E.° corner Fremont and Tehama Streets, San Francisco, 
Practical Machinists and Iron Founders, 

.MANUFACTURE 

STEAM E X G I X E S , 

QUARTZ-MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, SAW- 
MILL'*, FLOUR-MILLS, 
Dunbar's Improved Self- Adjusting 
I'ISTOX PACK /NO, 
Now so extensively used in the East aud in this Stato 
Requires no springs or screws ; is always steam-tight ; 
nitnout excessive iriction, and never gels Black or leaky 

IIAXSCOM'S CRUSHER, 

The pcsl of the kind now lu use In tills Stato or anywhere 
else. All kinds of GRINDERS snd AMALGAM AT 'RS 
made to order. Manufactured of the new Prospecting 
Quartz-Mills, consisting ol Boiler, Engine, 2-stanip Bat- 
tery and Grinding and Amalgamating Pan, complete, lor 
working Ire m one ton per uay upwards. Drawings are 
furnished with each of these mills, so that auy competent 
engineer can set it up in running order in two days' time. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER-WHEEL, 
Giving greater power at lower cost than any wheel id use. 

Send lor one of our circulars giving full tables. 

All Wheels warranted to give the Power aa set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

SOLE MAKERS FOP. THIS COAST OF THE " PENDER 
GAST WHITE IKON STAMP .-HUES AND DIES " 
None goDuinc unless obtained from ua. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by ue 
at market prices. Particular attention given to drawings 
and specifications ot machinery, wrncu will he made to 
order. The p ttronage ol the public ia rcspei ifully solicited. 

aa- Particular atti-ntiou paid to HOUSE WORK and 
ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS. 



rpHE CALIFORXIAX'S 
SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS DIHECTOBY 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
J. D. Arthur i Co. , corner of California and Davis. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Townsend k Wyneken, 405 Calilornia. 

AUCTIONEERS. 
Cobb A; Slnton, 407 California street. 

BALL AND RAt'KET COURT. 
Thomas Kelly, 846 Howa'rd street. 

BILLIARD SALOONS. 
A. B. Brown, 328 Montgomery street. 

BOWLING ALLEYS. 
Wholers & Steil.Pine aud Montgomery, (Ruts Hoo»e 

BOOKS. 

E. F. Arnold. 538 Market street near Montgomery. 
A. Roman A: Co., 417 and 41H Montgomery street. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 
Weutworth, Hobart A Co. t» bolesale mannfac.) MO Piu» 

CARPETS. 

P. F. Loughrau & Co. ,407 Sausome street. 

CLOTHING. 
H M. Lockwood k Co., 624 Clay street. 
J R. Mead \ Co., corner Montgomery and Buah atreete 
William Sherman, 412 Sansenie. corner Commercial. 
Quiucy Hall, MS, 047, and 549 Washington street 

COAL OIL, LAMPS, ETC. 
Dell.Cranna & Co. (wholesale) 613 Front street. 
A. C. Dielz k Cj., (wholesale,) 621 From street. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Blake, removed to 645 Clay street' 
Dr. Win. B. McAllister, removed 18 Third street. 
N.T Whilcomb, 205 Third, near Howard. 

DANCINO ACADEMY. 
Coghill's, Congress Hull. Bush, above Montgomery. 
Fuller & McCarthy , 727 Market, uear Third. 

DRY GOODS. 
Meagher, TaalTe v Co. . 9 Montgomery street. 
Mosgrove & Blakely , 222 Third , near Howard. 
Buyer k Reich, S W corner Jackson and Stockton. 

DRUCGISTS. 

Waters k Dillon, (Billiard Saloon,) 314 Montgomery 31 

G. G. Burnett, (Apothecary,) 330 Montgomery. 
Shepardson & Gales, (successors to R. Hall & Co.,) cor 

ner Sausoine aud Commercial. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

Pacitlc Busiuess College, 761 Market street, above Third, 
Prof. Williams' Commercial Academy, 869 Mission at. 

FURNITURE. 
Goodwin k Co., 510 aud 628 Washington streets. 
N. P. Cole k C". , 21 Sutter and 524 Market streets. 

GROCERS. 

Slosson k Ladd. southwest corner Folsoin and First. 
Haskell & Co. . Market aDd Suttorsts. below the alarka 
W. M. Noble ft Co., cor Howard and Twelilh street* 

HATTER. 

I. .: notl (wholesale and retail) 227 Montgomery street 

HAY AND GRAIN. 
J.B. Holmes it Co., 110 Market street, 
HOTELS. 

Brooklyn, John Kelly, Jr. .Sausome, corner Pine. 
Chicago, E. W. Heimburg & Co. , 220 Pacific street 
John Steinmann, 323 Pine. 

INSURANCE. 

Accidental and Casualty. R. L. k F. Ogden, Montgou. 
ery street, corner California. 
Brooklyn Life, S T King, Agent, S E cor Moolg'y 1 Plna 
Equitubfe Life, R. L. k F. Ogden, Montgomery, corner 

Cilifornia. 

Manhattan, R. B Swain & Co. . Ag Is, 206 Front, cor Cat 
Firemens Fund Ius. Co., S. E. cor. Moulg'y and Plue 
Occidental Ins. Co.,S.W. cor Montgom'y and California 
Pacitlc Ins Co. , 436 California street. 

LADIES' BIJOUTERIE, CLOAKS, ETC. 

Rosenblatt's. 123 and 126 Montgomery street. 
LIVERY AND SALE STABLE. 

Philip Morshead, removeu to Howard, near Fifth, 
White At Young, 211 Pine street. 

LUMBER. 

Armstrong, Sheldon k Co., corner Mitsion and fpear 

street-. 

MILITARY GOODS AND REGALIA. 
T. Rodger.- Johnson, Odd Fellow's Hall, 326 Montg'ry St . 
NOTARY PUBLIC, 

H. S. Tibbey, Gt>4, Montgomery street. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC (JALLER1C8. 

New York, B. F. Huwland proprietor, '.6 Third Street, 

below Market. 

PIANOS, MUSIC, ETC. 
M. Gray, 013 Clay street. 

W. S. Pierce, removed (o 634 Market, opposite Second 
C. Weiderhold A: Co., 086 Market near Third. 

PHOTOGRAPHS, CUTLERY, SPECTACLES, ETC. 

Lawrence & Housewortb, 317 and 310 Montgomery at 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS. 
Daly A: Hawkins, '^20 Montgomery street. 
Dam \ Sutherland, H20 Montgomery. 
Geo. W. Cliapin. 338 Montgomery. 
John Pforr, 328 Montgomery. 

3TSTAURANTS. 
Bivalve, Nolting k Sp-een, 640 Market, near Kearny. 
Indies' Refreshment Saloon, Swain At Brown, 636Mararl 

Magnolia, 143 Third street. 

Market, by Felix and Gustavo Besson, 520 Merchant. 
Helvetia, Johnjury k Bros. , 624 Merchant street. 
Sair ' ''ann's, 506 Montgomery street. 

SALOONS. 

Russell Ac Holding's Exchange, 622 Market street. 
Charter Oak, Frank Kelly, N E cor Third and Howard 
Ra/zcltis Co.'s. 527 Washington, above the Market. 
Jones' Sample Rooms, S.E. cor. Montgomery and Cat 
V. Squarzii. 44 LcidesdorfTslrect. 
Coates k Henderson, 87 Suttor street. 

SCALES. 

Fairbanks k Hutchinson, Depot for Fairbank.' Scales 

120 California street. 

SEWING MACHINES. 
Grovor k Baker, R. G. Brown, 116 Montgomery. 
The Florence, ofllce 111 Montgomery street. 
Wheeler tWilson, corner Montgomery and Sacramento 

STOVES AND TIN WARE. 
A. Swigert, corner Fifth and Fotsom. 

TOYS, ETC. 
Fcldbuah A: Co., 207 Montgomery street 
A. Kohler, 620 Washington street. 

WATER-CURE INSTITUTE. 
Dr Bourne's Pioneer, 10 Post, near Montgomery, 

WOODA.ND COAL YARD. 
Flynn & O'Grady, 860 Howard street ' 



The Californian 



13 



J-I 



MORE VIRTUOUS THAN WISE. 

A lady of the Methodist persuasion, who 
was not possessed of a superabundant quan- 
tity of cwebro-spioal axis, ODce got into a 
'meeting intended for the male members of the 
church only. She was much anuoyed to fiod 
" only men " there ; but commending herself 
to the care of the Lord she kept ber seat with 
courage, nothing daunted, and trusted that 
«ome of the " sistren " would arrive before 
the services commenced. 

If she was annoyed at the presence of the 
"' brethren," minus the usual sprinkling of the 
other sex, the male members were none the 
less annoyed at her presence. 

What was to be done ? She must be got 
rid of— but bow ? They did not wish to offend 
the simple-minded spirit, but as long as she 
remained, business could not progress. The 
parson hemmed, hawed, and began to grow 
nervous ; but there she sat bolt upright, a 
eheop among wolves. At last the parson found 
courage to say : 

" Sister B , will you please retire ?" 

Imagine the consternation of the " wolves " 
when, rath an indignant flush mounting up 
her cheeks, she arose and exclaimed in a tone 
that indicated virtuous indignation in the 
superlative degree : 
"No! I'll leave Ike house first!" 
And leave the house she did. She has since 
moved to another town and joined the Congre- 
gationalists. 

Moral : Virtoo is its own reward. 



M. KELLER, 

PROPRIETOR OF THE 
RISING SUN AND LOS ANGELES VINEYARDS. 

DEPOT FOR THE SALE OF HiS 
NATIVE WINES AND BRANDIES, 

Wine and Brandy Bitters, 
BASEMENT OF MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 
Coiner uf Battery and Washington Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



The Monster Bells of the World. — In 
making large bells, loudness rather than pitch 
is the object, as the sound can be conveyed to 
a much further extent. This accounts for the 
enormous weight of some of the largest bells. 
St. Paul's, for instance, weighs 13,000 pounds; 
the bell of Antwerp, 16,000 pounds; Oxford, 
17,000; the bell at Rome, 19,000 pounds; 
Mechlin, 20,000 pounds ; Bruges, 22,000 
pounds; York, 24,000 pounds ; Cologne, 25,- 
000 pounds ; Montreal, 29,000 pounds ; Er- 
furt, 30,000 pounds ; " Big Ben," at the 
House of Parliament, 31,000 pounds ; Sens, 
34,000 pounds ; Vienna, 40,000 pounds ; Nov- 
gorod, 69,000 pounds ; Pekin, 139,000 pounds; 
Moscow, 141,000 pounds. But, as yet, the 
greatest bell ever known is another famous 
Moscow bell, which was never hung. It was 
cast by order of the Empress Anne in the 
year 1653, It lies brokeu on the ground, and 
is estimated to weigh 443,772 pounds. It is 
nineteen feet high, and measures around the 
margin sixty-four feet. No wonder that it has 
never been suspended. There are few bells of 
interest in the United States. The heaviest 
is probably the alarm bell on the City Hall in 
New York, weighing about 23,000 pouuds. 
As the Russians make their pilgrimage to the 
great Moscow bell and regard it with super- 
stitious veneration, so the American citizen 
honors and venerates the old Independence 
bell in Philadelphia, for he is not only re 
minded of the glory of the revolution, but he 
believes now more than ever in its inscription, 
since the injunction bus been obeyed — "Pro 
claim liberty throughout the land, unto all the 
inhabitants thereof." 



G. GROEZINGER, 

DEALER IN 

Native California 

RED AND WHITE WINES. 
Brandies, Port, Sherry, Augelica, Etc., 

N. Vf. CORNER OF BATTERY AND PINE STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



J a CUTBERLET, 

CUSTOM 
BOOT AND SHOE STORE 



— ALSO — 

FRENCH SCREWED BOOTS AND SHOES, 
No. 540 Washington Street, near Montgomery Street 



The Finest qimlity of CUSTOM WORK neatly executed. 
Always on hand other fine work ready made 



HE CELEBRATED PIANOS 



WINE SALOON. 
Union Saloon. — C. H. Cordes is the proprietor of 
ths Union Saloon, Market street, a few doors south 
of Fremont, where is to be found the choicest wines 
and liquors. Mr. Cordes prides himself on his Ken- 
tucky Whisky, which is very old and oily. The 
" Davis" brand whiskv drinkers should by all means 
call and test this whisky. Hot lunch is set on the 
table from 10 till 2. 



California Wines. 

Vintage 1862. 

HE UNDERSIGNED OFERS 1'OR SALE SOME 
_ very choice Wines, of the above named vintage. 
That connoisseurs, all interested in tho development of 
this magmtlcent resource of our State, and the public 
generally, may be convinced that C tliroruia is able to pro- 
duce as good Wine (when properly treate I and of suffi- 
cient age) as other part; of tho Wmo producing regions 
of the globe, attention is respectfully called to these 
Wines, by A. S. LOWNDES, Wine Merchant, 

311 Battery Street, S. F. 



u O UR 0PERA " 

CAPT. JOHN H. MAY, 
615 WASHINGTON STREET, 613, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 
Opposite Maguire's Opera House. 



JOHN TAYLOR, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 

NO. 16 THIRD STREET, 
Between Market and Stevenson Streets., San Francisco. 



THE BEST FAMILY WINES 
IN THE CITY 

— Are to be found at — 

HOADLKY k CO.'S, 

533 Merchant street, under 
Pacific Fruit Market. 

fg- Call and try our Sonoma Champagne, Vega del Rio, 
Sonoma Port, Red anil White Wines, Wine an.l Brandy 
Bitters, and all the varieties usually found in a California 
Wine Cellar. 





J. B. DUNHAM, F. C. LIGHTE & CO., 
AND ERNEST GABLER, 

Are warranted for FIVE YEAP>-\ and indorsed by the 
LEADING PIANISTS of AMERICA as SUPERIOR IN- 
STRUMENTS. 

Sole Agents— C WIEDERHOLD & CO , 

685 Market street, near Third. 




QREAT TRIUMPH ! 

STEINWAY &. SONS 

Were awarded the FIRST PRIZE 
MEDAL at the ' late great 
INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION AT LONDON, river the 
wo hundred and sixty -niuePiauos entered for competition 
from all parts of the world. 

The Special Correspondent of the New York Timess&yt 

" Messrs. Steiuway & Sons' indorsement by the Jurors 
Is emphatic, and stronger and more to tho point than that 
of any European maker." 

A constant supply of the above Buperior instruments can 
be found at the Agent's, 

M. GRAY, 613 Clay street. 
PIANO TUNING done by a first-class Workman, from 
Steinway & Sou's Factory, New York 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

No. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

All kiwis of Brass^ 
Composition, Zinc, 
and. Babbitt Mela 
Castings, furnished 
at the shortest notice. 
Brass Ship-Work nj 
^„ all kinds, Spikes, 

Sheathing Nails, Rudder Braces. Hinges, etc., constantly 
on hand and made to order. Also, manufacture Ship and 
St'-amhoat Bells and Gongs o f superior tone. 

All kinds of Steam, Liquor, Water, Oil, and Flange 
Cocks and Valves made and repaired. 

Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and 
Connections of allsizcsaud patterns, furnished with dis- 
patch. riilCES MOD EH A IE. 

V. KINGWELL. JOS. H. WEED, SAM'f. WHITE. 




A country editor, describing a new organ, 
says : " The swell died away in delicious suf- 
focation, like one singing a sweet song under 
the bed-clolhes." 



Tyler Brothers, 

j 0/Sjif2 L<iVl Market St., cor. Third, Mtfgi 

SlEKJr SAN FRANCISCO, 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

SCHOOL BOOKS. "J^ZL' 

STATIONERY, 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, 

BLANK BOOKS, 

■•«nrA ti* ' i ■ PORTFOLIOS, 

•^Ti' ' - 'Jl' \ JUVENILE BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S PICTURE BOOKS, 

FANCY ARTICLES, Etc. 
ESPKCUL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

LADIES' STATIONERY, 

Which we Stamp with Iuitlals 
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE. 

WEDDING AND~VISITING CARDS 
Engraved, Written or Printed, 



DUNBAR'S EXCHANGE, 
No. 223 Bush Street, 
Bet. the Occidental and Cosmopolitan Hotels 

HARRY RIKER would be pleased to see his 
old Iriends at any hour of the day. 

Hot Lunch every day from 11 a. m. till 2 r. M. 

J. W. DUNBAR, Proprietor. 



FAUST CELLAR, 

Beer and Wine Saloon, 

Southeast comer of Clay am! Montgomery streets, 
san Francisco. 



A. L. THIELE, 



Proprietor 



ALWAYS ON HAND, Wholesale and Retail, West- 
phalia Hams. Russian CAVIAR, Sardines, Ancho- 
vies, Swiss and Ltmburg Cheese, and other European 
Delicacies. JO" The finest brands of Liquors, Wines aud 
Cigars ; Seltzer Water. 

FISHING AND HUNTING PARTIES titled out at the 
shortest notice. 



lyj ART! N GROSTETTA, 

LATE OF VIRGINIA CITY, 

Would respectfully Inform his friends and the public tha 
he has purchased the WELL-KNOWN SALOON previous- 
ly occupied by THOS. DOYLE, 635 SACRAMENTO ST., 
above the What Cheer House. The best kind of Wines, 
Liquors and Cigars always on hand. Passengers' Stores 
carefully put up to order. 



w 



ONDERS OF WONDERS ! 

TO BE SEEN ONLY AT 1UE 

v nciftc Museum of Anatomy and Science, 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 

between Call^rnlsa id Pine. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

Northeast corner Fremont and Minion streets, 
Manulacturers of 
MAUINE AND STATIONARY" ENGINES, 
Quartz Mai liiuery, Saw, Flour and Sujiar Mille,*Mining 
Sumps, H'listmg Gear, AgficUltaral ImpInmentR, etc. 

Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Treses of tli: latest 
Improved Patterns. 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly on hand ; Quartz Mill Shoes and 
Di- s'warranted to be made of the best white iron. 
Dunbar's Improved Sell-Adjutting Piston-Packing, re- 
quires no springs or screws; is always steam-tight; with 
out excessive friction, and never gets slack or leakv. 

MACHINERY; OF ALL DE-CKIPTIOX^, ' 
Bought, sold, or exchanged. Bolt Cutting and Castings 
at the lowest market rate*. 

DEVOE, D1NSMORE & CC. 



TOHN HAGAN, 



Marble - Worker, 

MARKET ST , OPPOSITE LINCOLN SCHOOL 
Hut>E, between Fifth and Sixth. 

Marble Mutols, Grates, Monuments, Hr-ad-tpi^ 
stones, Cmeteiy Copings, anil all kinds of 
Marble Work executed on most reasonable 1 
terms] Particular attention phfi tithe placing 
of Tombstones at Lone Mountain or Calvaryl^p^ 
Cemeteries. N. B. — Country orders promptly attended to. 




Great K eduction in Hates. 

QPPOSITION TO NEW YORK 
E I 'ER Y VII 'ENT Y DA YS ! 

Cwrying the (Jailed States Mail via Nicaragua ! 
THE OPPOSITION STEAMER 

M 0 S E S TAYLOR. 

Will sail for SAN JUAN DEI. SCR. Nicaragua, from 
MTSrION STREET WHAKF.at 11 oV.ock, A. M ,on 

TOfeSDR FP'M* 1 - . JUNE 2nth^ 1867, 

Connecting at Gi evtown with the magnificent Steamship 
NEVADA, 3,u00 tons, for NEW YORK. 

^_Tlie AMERICA will sail July 15th. 

For further information, applv to 

I. W. RAYMOND, Agent, 

Northwest corner Battery and Pine street)., ui> shtirs. 




MACCARONI, YERMlCELLf, 

-* PASTE 'iS^FA RXWIA.'- 

(qOgjA^oME^ST. 706?) 

^SA£OFjRANCISCO 



J R. MEAD & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale nnd Retail Dealers In 

FINE C LO THING, 
Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

TRUNKS, VALISES, CARPET BAGS, ETC.. 
.200 & 202 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Corner of Bush, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Asphaltum Rooting. 

PAVEMENTS, KOOF1NG, 
CELLAR FLOORS, WATER HOUSE*, 

And all kinds of 

Asphaltum Work, 

Done at shortest notice, and at moderate prices, by 
M. BONNET, 
OUice — Express Building (up stni.s). 
N. E. cor. Montgomery and Oalifornia sts., Sau Francisco 



AT THE REGULAR 



C. E. COM.INS «fc CO., 

603 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. ' 
JTos. 4!} and 44 Nassau Street, 
NEW YORK. 
Dealers t'«* American, Sn-iss and English 
WATCHES, 
JEWELRY AND ATKRIALS. 

— a 

j(g?-We have made arrangements to toy AMERI- 
CAN WATCHES in largo quantities fn m the Fac 
tory, and will receive a discount on Ihe regulai 
Wholesale Prices. We will hercalter 

Retail the American Watches 

Jooe; A -axjiovahO uki/ w 

The Regular Wholesale Prices. 

Our only profit be ing the small 
per cent, allowed by buying in 
.^large quantities. 



OWE'S NEW STYLE 



FAMILY SEWING MACHINES. 
GREAT IMPROVEMENT— J UST RECEIVED 

E-PEflALLY ADAPTED FOR FINE WORK. Also. 
Bi aiding, Hemming, etc. The advantage these Machine- 
halve is extreme simplicity, very stioug and durable, not 
iiahle to get out of order— adapted equally well to all 
grides of work. The Howe should be examined by all 
contemplating purchasing. H. A. DEM1NG, 

137 Kearny street, S. W, cor. Sutter, Sau Francisco, Cal 



^ P. COLE & CO., 

WHOLESALK, 

Furniture Warehouse, 




Adams, Dentist, 423 * 



ontgomery 



No. 314 Pine xtreet, San Francisco. 

LOWEST RATES AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK ON THE 
COAST. 

RETAIL STORE, 

Nos. 5^!4 Market, and 21 Sutter streets— next door to 
tbe Metropolitan Market. 

HEALY'S CURATIVE OIL, 

For the Extermination of Pain, is a Sovereign Remedy 
for Rheumatism, Headache, Toothache, Sore Throat, 
Cramps In the Limbs, Diarrhrea, Sprains, BruisesJBu na 
and Cuts, an 1 for the Bites of Poisonous Insects, Froscn 
Feet, etc. , stands unrivalled. 

For Sale by all dealers in medicines. Price One Pallor 
par b ottle. 



14 



The Calilornian. 



ONLY A DEEAM. 

BY A. J. RAQC1EB. 

By the lake, beyond the meadow, 

Where the lilies blow — 
As the young moon dipt and lifted 

Her reflected bow ! 
Lived and died a dream of beanty, 

Many years ago. 

Something made the milk-white bloasoms 

Even whiter grow ; 
Something gave the dying sunset 

An intenser glow ; 
And enriched the cup of pleasure, 

Filled to overflow. 

Hope was frail, and Passion fleeting- 
It is often so ; 

Visions born of golden sunsets. 
With the sunsets go ; 

To have loved is to have suffered 
Martyrdom below ! 

By the lake, beyond the meadow, 

Where the lilies blow, 
Of the glory there that perished, 

None shall ever know — 
Wneu the human heart was broken, 

Many years ago ! 

Extra ordinary Story of a Dead Man. — 
The following curious incident has just come 
to light. About twenty-one years ago, a 
young man named Turner was living at a large 
academy at Amersham, Bucks, filling the po- 
sition of teacher of languages. One evening 
he was seized with a fit— he being subject to 
them — and the next morning his bed-room 
window was found open and he was missing 
from the room. About ten days after the 
body of a young man was found lying, face 
downward, in some shallow water, and the 
body was at once supposed to be that of ton 
unfortuuate young man, and on a number of 
the scholars and the relatives viewing the 
body, they all identified it as that of their 
teacher and friend. The body in due course 
was interred by the relatives, and the mother 
took possession of a watch belonging to de- 
ceased, and wore it till her death. A few days 
ago some of the relatives of Turner received a 
letter from Ballarat, Australia, and were not a 
little surprised to find that their relative, 
whom they believed to be dead and buried, 
and whose grave they had kept up ever since, 
was still alive, quite well, and in a very com- 
fortable position. 

How Names Cbasge. — A Scotchman 
named Feyerston settled among some Ger- 
mans in the western part of the State of New 
York. They translated bis name by the sound 
into the German Feursteio. On his return to 
an English neighborhood, his acquaintances 
discovered Feurstein in German means Flint 
in English. They re-translated his name, and 
the family Dame became Flint. One of the 
grandsons settled on the Arcadian coast o( 
the Mississippi, and with the common fate of 
his family, his Dame of Flint becanie translated 
by the French iuto Pierre a-Fusil. His son 
wect North, and the last transformation was a 
re-translation, and Pierre a-Fusil, hien, so be- 
came Peter Gun. 



T y 1 e r 



Brothers, 
iffl 



JS Ml 01^ 691 Market sc., cor. Third 
QQQr SAX FRANCISCO, 

luiporters. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
SCHOOL BOOKS, 

STATIONERY, 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, 

BLANK BOOK 3 , 
PORTFOLIOS, 

JUVENILE BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S PICTURE BOOKS, 

FANCY ARTICLES, Etc. 
ESPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

LADIES' STATIONERY, 

Which we Stamp with Initials 
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE. 

WEDDING AND VISITING CARDS 
Engraved, Written or Printed. 



HEALY'S CURATIVE OIL, 

For the Extermination of Pain, is a Sovereign Remedy 
for Rheumatism, Headache, Toothache, Sore Throai, 
Cramps iu tbe Limbs. Diarrhoea, Sprains, Bruises, Bu-ns 
and Cuts, an 1 Tor the Bites of Poisonous Insects, Frozen 
Feet, etc. , stands unrivalled. 

Fur Sale by ail dealer*, in medicines. Price One Dollar 
per bottle. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1851. 

Lawrence & House worth, 




317 AND 319 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

THE LARGEST OPTICAL INSTRUMENT Es- 
tablishment on tbe Pacific Coast. Import ail 
their own goods direct from European and Amer- 
ican manufacturers, and have a larger and more 
complete assortment than all other dealers com- 
bined 

SPECTACLES and EYE-GLASSES warranted to 
suit the sight in every par.icutar. 

Double sighted Spectacles, Tinted Spectacles 
and Brazilian Pebble Spectacles of the most ap- 
proved form. 

Those who have been disappointed at other es- 
tablishments will certainly be pleased with the 
Spectacles they purchase from us. 

& B. — Inferior Glasses are hot sold 
by us to the unwary for Brazilian 
Pebbles. 

LAWRENCE & HOUSEWCRTH, 
OP T I C I A N S , 
317 and 319 Montgomery Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



o 
p 

T 

I 

c 
I 

A 
N 

s 



Complete Catalogues of Optical Iostruments furnished free. 



Beauty! 

Auburn, Golden, Flaxen and Silken Curls, 

PRODUCED BY THE USE OP PROF. DE 1:1. LUX 
FRISER LE CHEVETJX. 
One application warranted to cnrl the most straight 
and stubborn hair of either sex into wavy ringlets, or 
h»-avy massive curls. Has "been used by the fashion- 
ables of Paris and London, with the most gratifying 
results. Does no injury to the hair. Price by mail, 
sealed and post paid, $i: Descriptive circulars mailed 
tree. Address 

BERGER, SHUTTS & CO., Chemists, 

No. 285 River street, Troy, N. T. , 
Sole Agents for tbe United States: 



•J"^ GH1RARDELLI & CO.'S 

Italian Manufactury, 

415 and 417 JACKSON ST. , SAN FRANCISCO, 
Manufacturers and Dealers in 

PLAIN, SWEET, CINNAMON AND 

VANILLA CHOCOLATES; 
PREPARED COCOA, COCOA PASTE, 

CRACKED COCOA, COCOA SHELLS, etc. , etc. 
PURE GROUND OLD JAVA COFFEE AND 

COSTA RICA COFFEE; 

CHARTRES AND RIO COFFEE; 

GREEN COFFEE OF EVERY QUALITY. 
CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS: 
N: B — Ghirardelli's Choco'ate is manufactured by 
steam from Cocoa of the Onest quality, imported direct. 
In excellence and delicacy of flavor, it is superior to any 
imported Chocolate: 



fJIHE SIGN OF THE BIG GLOVE. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 
25 Post street, between Montgomery and Kearuy streets. 

J. F. SNOW, THE "GLOVE MAN," CLEANS — 
furs without removing the lining. All kiuds ofAlj 
Dresses — including Stage and Party Dresses — lilj 
WITHOUT RIPPING. Woolen Goods, shawls. Buck ■ 
and Kid Gloves, Buck Undervesfa, Feathers, etc., etc He 
dyes Kid Gloves and Feathers. 

RING'S VEGETABLE AMBROSIA FOR THE HAIR FOR 
SALE. 



Peet & Son, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS, 
No. 315 BATTERY STREET, 
Nex Door to Commercial Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



JkjATHANIEL GRAY & CO., 
UNDERTAKERS, 
CITY AND COUNTY SEXTON, 

641 SACRiMENTO STREET, CORNER OF WEBB 

| S=>lc agents for BARSTOWS PATENT METALLIC 
BURIAL CASES and CASKETS. 



PHILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

Jorner Sj^jaI *ad FojBom streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

HOELSCHER & WIELAND, 

Proprietors 




O A G L A N D & N E W S 0 M 

ARCHITECTS, 

Southwest corner Sacramento and Kearny streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



WILLIAM JAMES, 

Newark, N. J 



DAVID 



■ San Francisco. 



1. OOBBLEDICX, }^ 

jyjEEKER, JAMES & CO., 

Importers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

Wagon & Carriage Materials, 

NOS. 12 AND 14 PINE STREET. 

The Largest Establishment on the Pacific Coast for tbe 
supply of materials for 



WAGONS, TRUCKS, 
CARTS, OMNIBUSSES, 
CARRIAGES, COACHES, 
EXPRESS WAGONS, 
=£f BUGGIES, SULKIES, Etc. 



Also, Importers of 

GREGG'S TENONING MACHINES, 

Hub Boring Machines, Thimble Skeins for Wood 
Axles, Hub Bands, Axle Clips Shaft Shackles, 
Malleable Iron Castings, Concord Axles and 
Springs, 

Orders from the country solicited and promptly 
attended to. MEKKER, JAMES k Co. 




REMOVAL. REMOVAL. 

Larkins & Co., 



Manufacturers of every description of 

CARRIAGES. 

CONCORD WAGONS, Ranch Wagons and Buggies 
made to order. f/9, All kiuds of Jobbing and Carriage 
Painting done at tbe shortest notice. 
$0~ New Manufactory Nos. 631 and 633 Howard street, 
corner of Hubbard, between second aod Third, 
San Francisco. 



FOLSOM 




Carriage Manufacturer, 

No. 531 California street, 

Between Montgomery and Kearny streets, San Francisco. 

EVERY DESCRIPTION OF CARRIAGES, EXPRESS 
Wagons, Baggies, etc , made to order, of tbe best 
materials and workmanship. 

Repairing anil General Blacksmlthing done with prompt- 
ness, and at prices to suit the times. 



s 



AUL & McARRON, 



Manufacturers of 
STAGE AND TIIOROUGHBRACE WAGONS, 
NO. 579 and 581 MARKET STREET, 

Near Second Street, San Francisco. 

Makes to order all kinds of Carriage and Boggy Work, 
Express and Tliorougbbrace Wagons aud Stage W'rk. 

A general assortment of new and second-band Wagons 
on hand. Jobbing done with neatness and dispatch- 



Pollard & Carvill, 

Dealers in and Manufacturers of 

LIGHT CARRIAGES 

AND BUGGIES, 

37 and 39 Webb street, 
Between Sacramento and California. 

Also, Repairing, Rlarksmithing. Painting and Trim 
ming done with neatness and dlspatcn. 




c 



V. POPPER, 

G hiropedist 



o r n s 

DR. 

Surgeon 

No 20 Montgomery street, belweer Post and Sutter, 
San Francisco. Office hours from 9 a . M to 5 P. M. 

Offers his services to the public as an Operator on such 
excrescences as hard and soft corns, enlarged joints, club 
nails, bunions, nails penetrating the fleeh, warts, etc 



Whiskers and Mustaches ! 



FORCED TO GROW UPON THE SMOOTHEST FACE 
face in from three to live weeks bv using Dr. 
SEVIGNE'S RESTAURATEUR CAPILIAIRE. the most 
wonderful discovery in modern science, upon the Beard 
and Hair in an almost miraculous manner. It has been 
used by the elite of Paris and London with most flat 
tenng success. Names of all purchasers will be regis 
tered, and if entire sati-faction is not given in every 
instance, the money will be cheerfully refunded. Price 
by mail, sealed and post paid. $1. Descriptive circulars 
and testimonials mailed tree. Address 

BERGER, BHUTTS & CO., Chemists, 

No. 285 River street, Trov, N. T. , 
Sole Agents for the United States. 



"V"ATURE UNVEILED, 

" AT THE 

PACIFIC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY AND SCIENCE 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 
Between lifornla and Pine 



P<IRE AND MARINE INSURANCE. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Nos. 416 and 418 California Street. 

INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY. 

Cash Capital, .... $750,000 

The California Lloyds, 

HAVING CONSOLIDATED WITH THE UNION INSUR- 
ANCE COMPANY, JANUARY 1, 1866, THIS COMPaNY 
ARE NOW PREPARED 10 EFFECT MARINE AS WELL 
AS FIRE INSURANCE UPON THE MOST FAVORABLE 
TERMS. 

LOSSES PROMPTLY AND EQUITABLY ADJUSTED 
AND PAID IN GOLD COIN. 



Directors. 

Benjamin Brewster, 
Lloyd Tevis, 
Thos. H. Selby, 
Nicholas Lnning, 
John Purrott, 
J. Underbill, 
M. D. Sweeny, 
C. N. Fclton, 
James Phelao, 
Giistuve Toucbard, 
Michael Castle, 
Nicholas Larco, 
N. G. Kittle, 
Win. C. Talbot, 
Patrick McAran, 
Geo. C- Johnson, 
Caleb T. Fay, 



J. Mora Mosb, 
James Otis, 
Wm. E. Barron, 
J. G. Kittle, 
Joseph A. Donohoe, 
M. J. O Co-mor, 
I Friedlander, 
Moses Heller, 
Lafayette Maynard, 
Charles L. Low, 
Jacob Scholle, 
James Hows, 
Joseph Seller, 
L H Allen, 
Wm. Hooper, 
C. Temple Emmet, 
Joseph Brandeustein, 

B F. Hastings, Sacramento. 
L. Cunningham, William Smith, 

Marysville. 

CALEB T. FAY, President. 
CHARLES D. HAVEN. Secretary. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, Mariue Director. 



QCCIDENTAL 

Insurance Company, 

Southwest corner Montgomery and California streets. 

INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY. 
Capital Stock, - - - $300,000 

LOSSES PAID IN UNITED STATES GOLD COIN. 

THIS COMPANY will insure against loss by Fire on any 
Dwelling House, Buildings, Mvchanise or other proper- 
ty, situate I iu the state of i alifomia. Tbe largest sum 
they will take on any one risk is thirty thousand dollars. 

C. CHRISTIANSEN, Prest. 
J. GREENEBAUM, Vice President. 
B. RoTEScniu), Secretary. 



"YJ AN H ATT A N LNBURANO* CO. 
OF NEW YORK. 

INCORPORATED 1821. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 81,250,000 

Insurance effected against both 

Fire and Marine Risks, 

AT THE LOWEST RATES. 

Losses promptly adjusted, and paid in United 
States Gold Coin. 

B. B. SWAIN At CO., Agent*, 
206 Front street. San Francisco. 



Ayer's Sarsaparilla 

TO 

Purify the Blood. 

NOT A FEW OF THE WORST DISORDERS THAT 
afflict mankind arise from the corruption that accu- 
mulates in the blood. Of all tbe discoveries that have 
been made to purge it out, none have been tonnd which 
could equal in effect Am; - Connraii Extbact or 
Sarsapabilla. It cleanses aud renovates the blood, in* 
stills the vigor of health into the system and purges out 
the humors which make disease. It stimulates the 
healthy functions of the body, and expels the disorders 
that grow and rankle in tbe blood. Its extraordinary 
virtues are not yet widely known, but, when they are, it 
will no longer he a question what remedy to employ Id 
the great variety of afflicting diseases that require an 
alterative remedy. Sucb a remedy , that could bs relied 
on, has long been sought for, and now, for the first time, 
tbe public have one on which they can depend. Our 
space here does not admit certiorates to show Its effects 
But the trial of a single bottle will show to the sick that 
it has virtues surpassing aoytbing tbey have ever taken. 
Sufferers from Scrofula, Scrofulous Swellings and Sores, 
try it and see the rapidity with which It cares. Stem 
Diseases, Pimples Pustules, Blotches, Eruptions, etc. , are 
soon cleaned out of tbe system. 

St. Anthony's Fire, Rose or Erysipelas, Tetter or Salt 
Rheum, Scald Haad, Riugworm, etc. . t hould not be borne 
while they can be so speedily cured by Aran's Sabsapa. 

BJLLA. 

Syphilis or Venereal Disease is expelled from tbe sys- 
tem by the prolonged use of this - ins u ■ . a i.i • . and the 
patient is left as healthy as it he never bad tbe disease. 

Female Diseases are caused by Scrofula in the blood, 
and are generally soon cured by this Extbacy or Sanaa- 
iakilla. Price $1 per bottle, or 6 bottles for $5. 

For all tbe purposes of a family physic, take Ann's 
Catuabtic Pills, which are everywhere known to be the 
best purgative that is offered to the American People. 

Prepared by Da. J. C. Atsb s> Co. , Low«U, Mara, and 
sold by all Druggists ai.d dealers in medicine everywhere. 

CRANE ,v BHIGHAM, San Francisco, 
Wholesale Agents. 



DEXTER STABLES, 
Bush Street, between Occidental and 
Cosmopolitan Hotels, Sao Francisco. 

W. Q. JONES • PaorarRO] 



The Californian. 



15 



AJTJYSTIHAN & AITKIN, 

Portland Boiler Works, 

311 AND 313 MISSION STREET, 
Between Beale aud Fremont streets, San Francisco. 



Manufacturers of Steam Boilers, high or low pressure — 
Cylinder, Tubular or Flue; Sheet Iron Work; Steam and 
Water Pipe of the best quality, and at more reasonable 
prices than any other establishment on the Par.iflc Coast. 

Being Practical Boiler Makers, of long experience, con- 
fining our whole time aud attention to our branch of bus- 
iness, and having enlarged our wurks, and also added the 
most improved tools in the country, we are enabled to 
turn out Boilers more expeditiously than sny other estab- 
lishment on the Pacific Coast— using none but the best 
quality and brands of Boder ami Sheet Iron and Boiler- 
Tubes. Those iu want of anything in the above line will 
do well to give us a call. Orders from the country will 
receive prompt attention. 

All work warranted according to order. Particular 
attention paid to Repairing Steam Boilers. 

T. J. MOVNIHAN, I „ .,„„ 
JAS. AITKEN, '} Proprietors. 



N 



EPTUNE IRON WORKS. 




Comer Mission and Fremont streets, San Francisco. 
MARINE, LOCOMOTIVE AND ALL KINDS OF 

HIGH- PRESSURE STEAM BOILERS 

Manufactured. 

The proprietor imports his own C. H. and B. Iron across 
the Isthmus, and Tubes of every size. Other parties can 
never blockade the market. He has made arrangements 
with the best houses in the East to furnish him with 
everything in the shape of Iron lie wants. 

All Boilers guaranteed and tested by U. S. Boiler In 
spector before they are sent out of the shop, at my ex- 
pcn>e. (;•;>.. Ul kinds of Sheet Iron and Water Pipe, Coal 
Oil Stills, Wiouirht Iron Worms, etc., manufactured to 
order. OLD BOILERS REPAIRED. 

D. CAMERON. 




MASONIC TEMPLE, 

Montgomery and Post streets, San Francisco. 
TO THE SICK! 

Cures Without Medicines. 

Experience of 25 years [15th (1866) in San Francisco,] 
enables DR. BOURNE to Guarantee Cures 1 He performs 
all he promises — more, if possible. Consultations Free. 
Call or send for circulars. 

10 MASONIC TEMPLE, POST STREET. 



FIN I(J AN 




NORFOLK STABLES, 

ELLIS STREET, BETWEEN POWELL AND MASON, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
THE FINEST STABLE KNOWN IN AMERICA. 

Horses, Buggies, and all kinds of Carriages to let on rea- 
sonable terras. Particular attention paid to boarding 
horse*. Ladles' and Gentlemen's Saddle Horses always 
on hand. P. A. FINIGAN, Proprietor. 



JOHN HAGAN, 

Marble - Worker, 

MARKET ST , OPPOSITE LINCOLN SCHOOL 
HOUSE, between Fifth and Sixth. 

Marble MaUels, Grates, Monuments, Hcad-I 
stones, Cemetery Copings, ami all kinds or ' 
Marble Work executed on most reasonable, 
terms. Particular attention pai l to the placing, 
or Tombstones at Loue Mountain or CalvaryL^ 
Cemeteries. N. B — Country orders promptly attended to. 




Powell Street 

WARM SWIMMING BATHS! 
N. E. Comer Powell and Filbert Streets, 
OPPOSITE WASHINGTON SQUARE. 
J. M. NASH PROPRIETOR. 

WARM AND COLD BATHS from 6 a. M to 9 p. M. 
daily, with every appliance usually connected 
with a well-ordered Gymnasium for the development 
of Health and Muscle. 

The only Complete Swimming Bath on 
this Coast. 

Another advantage connected with this establishment, 
not usually found in Swimming Baths, is, that the 
water is Continually Changing, Fresh Water running in 
and out Constantly. 

Single Baths, including Towels and Bathing Dress. 25 cts 
5 Bath Tickets, " " $1 

Call and Try Them. The Kearny Street and Mont- 
gomery Street Cars pass the door every Jive minutes. 

Tlie Baths are reserved for Ladies every Tuesday, 
from 6 a. m. to 9 p. m.. Ladies to supply their own 
Bathing Dresses. 

I will guarantee to impart a thorough practical knowl- 
edge of Swimming in one mvrith: Terms for the Course, $10. 

J. M. NASH. 



JACOB SHEW, 

Pioneer Photographer 

612 CLAY STREET, 
North side, four doors above Montgomery. 
Takes all kinds of Photographs in the very best style 
of the Art. Would especially invite attention to the supe- 
riority of the " Cabinet Photograph," or new size, taken 
at this establishment. 



pHOTOGRAPHY 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

Executed in a Superior Style, at 

GEO. D. MORSE'S 

NEW AND ELEGANT BOOMS, 

No. 315 Montgomery Street, corner of Summer. 

Photographs retouched in India Ink or Water Colors, 
and copied from daguerreotypes or amliroty pes to any size. 
All work guaranteed and perfect satislaction giveu. Call 
and see specimens before going elsewhere. 



J C.E. KLEPZIU, 

MANUFACTURER f 

DEALER IN \j ^^c.^S, '. ^V 5 ^-' 

GUNS, PISTOLS, 




Sporting Apparatus, 

AMMUNITION 

AND GUN MATERIALS, 

No. 733 Washington Street, San Francisco. 
Gilding and Silver Plating of all Kinds of metals ; also, 
Silver or Plated Ware reburnishod. 



JJOLBROOK, MERRILL & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

STOVES, TIN-PLATE, 

SHEET IRON, LEAD PIPE, PUMPS, ZINC, WIRE, AND 

HOUSE FURNISHING HARDWARE. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
TIN, SHEET-IKON AND COPPER WARE. 

Nos. 13 and 15 Front street San Francisco 

Nos. 176 and 178 J street , Sacramento 

Main street Austin, Nevada 



R R I V A L 

— OF— 

MADAME LAURUSTINUS, 

The Great Prophetess and Doctress. 
The Madame has astonished thousands of her visitors in 
Europe, England and America, by revealing the Past, 
Present and Future Events of Life, such as Law Suits, 
Travel by Sea or Land, Lost or Stolen Goods, Hidden Treas- 
ure, Absent Friends ur Relatives, and all affairs of business 
in general. 

*J*The Madame has a select assortment of pure Roman 
Talismans, for Love, Good Luck, Success in Business, and 
guaranteed for Life. 

Office of MADAME LAURUSTINUS, No. 816 Montgomery 
street, between Jackson and Pacific. Office hours, from 8 
o'clock in theraorning until 8 in the evening. 



.Newly Opened. 



D 



R. N. T. WHITCOMB, 



No. 



DENTIST, 
205 Third Street, San Francisco. 



Teeth filled with fine gold, artificial bone and platina. 
All plate work made and repaired, of the best material, 
at the shortest notice and warranted. None cheaper or 
better on the coast Call and examine specimens. 

North Beach and South Park Cars pass the door. 

N. T. WHITCOMB. 



J^OCTOR DEMAREST'S 

Private Medical Office, 

617 KEARNY STREET, 
• Near Commercial, Sau Francisco. 

Office Hocus : From 9i.it., till 4 p. u. 




McKee's 

NEW GROCERY 

AND 

FAMILY FURNISHING 

Store, 



No. 31 KEARNY STREET, 
Third Door South of Post Street, 

NOW RECEIVING ORDERS FOR GROCERIES, PRO- 
visious. Table Luxuries, and all Housekeeping 
ai tides of the best quality at low prices. 



0 0 

TRY IT! 

• STANDARD SOAP CO. 'S : 

I WASHING POWDER. • 

; It saves one-half the lime and : 
: labor of ordinary Soaps. Does : 
; not injure the Clothing. Get a : 
: package and give it a trial. So.d : 
.' by all Grocers. 



O 



•O 



THEODORE KALLENBERG, 

No. 416 Market street, - - - San Francisco, 

Machinist, 

Maker of Models for Inventors, Drawing Instruments, 
Small Machines, Philosophical Instruments, Scales and 
Weights, all kinds of Brass and Irou Work- 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



CALIFORNIA 

Steam Navigation Company. 

STEAMER CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE. 

CHRYSOPOLIS.CAPT. A. FOSTER. 

YOSEMITE 

" CORNELIA.... CAPT. W. BROMLEY. 
JULIA CAPT. E. CONCKLIN 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF, 
at 4 o'clock P. M., EVERY DA Y, (Sundays excepted.) for 
Sacramento and one for Stockton, the Sacramento steamer 
connecting with light-draft steamers for Marysville, Co- 
lasa.Chico and Red Bluff. 

Steamships PACIFIC, ORIZABA, CA1 IFORNIA , AC- 
7VKA',and SENA 10R, leave as advertised, Tor Portland, 
Oregon, New Westminster, British Columbia, Victoria, 
fV. L,j Santa Barbara, San Pedro, and Sau Diego. 

Office of the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets. 

B M. HARTSHORNE, Presideut. 



M RS. WINSHIP, 

Fashionable Milliner.^ 

NO. 23 POST STREET, f-fo 
Between Kearuy and Montgomery, JB jj|J 
SAN FRANCISCO. mi 



All kinds of Lace Work, Head Dresses, Breakfast Caps, 

Part 

Laces. 



&c, made to order. 
Particular attention paid to meu.liug aud doing up 



tg^. Goods received by every steamer, from New York 
and Paris. 



JL>EMOVAL.— F IRST PREMIUM 

Billiard 
TABLE 

MANUFACTORY. 



Has removed from C12 Battery street to 537 Sacramento 
street, a few doors below Montgomery, 

Has constant!? on hand a largo assortment of the best 
BILLIARD TABLED, with all the modern improvements. 
A. so BILLIARD TRIMMINGS of every description. 
All goods sold are warranted. 




AGENTS WANTED 
FOR 

rieadley's Great Work ! 

The only book issuod on our NAVY during the Rebellion. 
Agents find no competition. 

FARRAGUT AND OUR NAVAL COMMANDERS, 

Comprising Popular Biographies of our Naval Heroes, 
by Hon. J. T. Headley, the distinguished Author and His- 
torian—complete in one large volume — handsomely illus- 
trated in steel. The best paying Agency of the day. 
In connection with this work our Agents can take orders 
for flvo of Headlcy's Standard Works, Call or send ei 
once for Circulars and Terms. 

E. E. SHEAR, General Agent, 
No. 8 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



McDOUGALL & MARQUIS, 

Architects, 

328 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 



B. ii'DOVGALL. 



J. MABQCIS. 



Refers to Messrs. Elam & Howes, Clay street, below 
Battery; Messrs. Hatch * Co., (R. W. Brangon it T. H. 
Hatch,) Washington street below Battery; A. J. Coghill, 
Esq.. Front street, corner of Clay; Wm. J. Adams, Esq., 
(Adams, Blinn &Co.,) Piers 17 aud 19, Stewart street; Jo- 
seph Rich. Esq., Bush street below Turnverein Hall; Hon. 
M. S. Latham, London and San Francisco Bank; vt'm. B. 
Johnston, Esq., Insurance Building, 412 and 414 Montgom- 
ery street; James Brooks, Esq., Editor '* Golden Era." 



PRO BONO PUBLICO. 

LACOUirS 

SARSA PARIP HERE 

BITTERS 

POSSESS INVALUABLE PROPERTIES. 
They give Health to the Sick, 

Strength to the Weak, 

Joy to the Afflicted, 
«®»SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



F 



There cometh glad tidings of joy to all, 

To young and old, to great and to small; 

The beauty which was once so precious and raro, 

Is iree lor all, and all may be fair. 

By the use of 

CHASTELLAE'S 
WHITE LIQUID ENAMEL, 

OR IMPROVING AND BEAUTIFYING THE COM- 

plexion. 

The mo^t valuable and perfect preparation in use, for 
giving the skin a beautiful pearl-like tint, that is only 
found in youth. It quickly removes Tan, Freckles, 
Pimples, Blotches, Moth Patches, Sallowness, Eruptions, 
and all impurities of the skin, kindly healing the same, 
leaving the skin white and clear as alaba-ter. Its use 
cannot be detected by the closest crutiny, and being a 
vegetable preparation is perfectly harmless. It is the 
only article oi the kind used by the French, and is con- 
sidered by the Parisian as indispensable to a perlect 
toilet. Upwards of 3U,o00 bottles were sold during the 
past year, a sutlic ent guarantee of its etlicacy. Price 
only 75 cents. Sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt of 
order, by 

BERGER, SHUTTS & CO., Chemists, 

285 River street, Troy, N. Yi 



Jtxcelsior ! Jkxcelsior ! ! 

CHASTELLAE'S 

HAIR EXERMINATOR, FOR REMOVING 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR. 

TO THE LADIES ESPECIALLY, THIS INVALUABLE 
dejiliatory recommends itself as being an almost 
indispensable article to lemale beauty, is ea.-ily applied, 
does not burn or injure the skm, but acts directly on 
the roots. It is warranted to remove superlluous hair 
from low foreheads, or Irom any part of the body, 
completely, totally and radically extirpating the same, 
leaving the skin soft, smooth and natural This is the 
only art. tie ustd by the French, and is the only real 
effectual depilatory in existence. Price 75 cents per 
package, sent post-paid, to any address, on receipt of 
an order by 

BERGER, SHUTTS & CO. , Chemists, 

285 River street, Troy, N. Y. 



jN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FIF- 
M tceulh Judicial District of the State of California, in 
• >t.(i h,r the City and County ol San Francisco. 

EDWARD J. QUIRK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES P. HOR- 
BACU, et uls. , Defendants 

Acliuu brought m the District Court of the Fifteenth 
Judicial District of the State of California, in and for the 
City and Cuunty of San Fraucisco, and the complaint Oled 
in uic sitid city and county of San Francisco, in the office 
of I lie Clerk of said District Court. 

The People of the Slate of California send greeting to 
JAMliSP. HORBACH, HENRY DELVENDAHL, HENRY 
Li KEM MERMAN, ERNfcT JANfcSEN and GUST AV HELM- 
KJj, Defendants: 

You are hereby required to appear in an action brought 
against you by the above named Plaintiff, iu the District 
Court ot the Fifteenth Judicial District of the State of 
California, in and for the city and county of San Fran- 
Cisco, aud to answer vhe complaint filed therein, within 
ten days (exclusive of the day oi service) after the serv- 
ice on you ol tuis Summons — if served within this coun- 
ty ; or, if served out of this county, but in this 
Distrkt, within twenty days . otherwise, within forty 
days — or judgment hy detault will he taken against you, 
according to the prayer of said Complaint. 

The said action is brought to require you, the said de- 
fendants, to set forth the nature ot your respective claims 
to that certain lot or parcel of laud situate in said city-aud 
couuly of San Francisco, as particularly described iu the 
complaint herein, being subdivision No 5 of the 100 vara 
lot known on the man ol the cily of Sau Francisco as No. 
276, as designated ou a plat of Hie original subdivision 
thereof, recorded in the oilice of the County Recorder of 
said city and Couuly , in Liber 1 ul Certified Grants, at page 
156, that all adverse ciaims of said defendants and each of 
them may be determined by a decree of this Court; that by 
said decree it be declared and adjudged thai the said de- 
fendants, each and all of them, have no estate or interest 
whatever in or to said parcel of laud, aud that the title of 
plaiutilf thereto is good and valid . that said dclendants, 
and each ot them, be forever debarred from asserting any 
claim whatever in and to said land adverse to plaiutitl, and 
for such other and further retteJ as to this Hon. Courtshall 
seem meet and ugiecable lo equity, with c<'Sts of suit 
against such of the defendant! as shall defend this action. 

Aud you are hereby notified that if you tail to appear 
and answer the Said complaint, as above required, 
the said plaintiff uHI apply to the Court lor the relief 
demanded iu said complaint. 

Given under my band and seal of the District Court 
of the Fitecntu Judicial Distrh t of the Mate of Califor- 
nia, in and for the cily and count* of Sau Fraucisio, this 
25th day of Februan , iu the year of our Lord one thous- 
and eight bundled and sixty-seven. 

WM I.OEWY, Clerk, 

[seal.1 By OfTAvn s Bell, Deputy Clerk. 

Int. Rev. Stamp, canceled. 5e cts. 

Tuos. B. Bishop, P.aintitPs Attorney. mh30-13w 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. — ESTATE OF HEXRY 
SEAMAN, denaied. Notice is hereby given by the 
undersigned, Adinin^t: atrix ol the above named estate, 
to the creditois of, »ud ail |cisous having claima 
against the s'id 9*1 eased, to exhibit the same with 
the i.e<essary v> u> I erf. uitl m (en months alter the first 
publication oi iLis i. ot.ee, 10 tLe uudersigned, at the 
oiHee of I). I\ li..r> t< w, K.-q., No. 6 Montgomery Block, 
In tlie city and c unlv ol ran Fi uneven. 

JANE SEAMAN, 
Administratrix of the Estate of Henry seaman, deceased. 
May 10th, 1867. tnyll 6w 



STOCKD-aLE HO USE, 
Cornet Main aud oak streets, Petaluma 

ii. STOCKDAXE Proprietor 



The Californian. 



16 



M 



AGUIRE'S OPERA HOUSE. 



Toomas SUoitbe Sole Proprietor 

Cabs. Tibbetts, Business Manager 

C. L. Graves, Stage Manager 

Wm- Stevenson, Treasurer 

GRAND COMBINATION 

DRAMATIC ASD BALLET COMPANIES. 
EngageinsDt of the Celebrated 
M ARTINETTI TKOUPE, 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING. . . .JUNK 8th, 
Will be presented the Gorgeous Spectacle 01" 

THE NAIAD QUEEN. 

Sir Rupert Misa Sallie Hinckley 

Lurline.., Mrs. Sophie Edwin 

ldex Alma Mandeville Thome 

Mrs. Briget Mrs. C. R. Saunders 

Baptiste W. Barry 

Amphibeo Paul llartiuelti 

FAIRY BALLETS AND GRACEFUL DIVERTISEMENTS, 

By Mesdames Marzetti. Math'eu, Schmidt, Lehman, and 
the Large and Beautiful Corfis de Ballet. 

— ALSO — 

THE DEMON MARCH. 



Dress Circle 

Parquette 



FHICES OF ADMISSION: 

$1 00 I Orchestra fl 00 

50 I Upper Circle 85 



METROPOLITAN THEATER. 

Harbt Leslte Stage Manager. 

LAST TWO PERFORMANCES OF THE ETHEoPIAN 
COMEDIANS, 

MESSRS. LESLIE AND RATNOR, 

Late Members of the World-Renowned 

" Christy's Minstrels," 

Who will be assisted by a distinguished array of 
MINSTREL TALENT, in 

American Minstrelsy and Burlesque Opera. 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING . . . .JUNE 8th, 

A Brilliant Interlude, introducing the famous Stump 
Speech, Japanese Fiddle, Stocks Up and Down, and the 
Great Shadow Pantomime. 

The wonderful ZAMPILLAEROSTATIOX, the most 
wonderful Burlesque ever witnessed. 

To conclude with the 

BURLESQUE OPERA MARITANA, 

....wnH.... 

HENRI HERBERTE & MISS JULIA GOl'LD, 

NDAY EVENING JUNE 10th, 

Met appearance of the 

GREAT DRAGON TROUPE. 



M 



AGUIRE'S ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 



Thomas Magore Sole Proprietor 

Cbables Tibbetts Business Manager 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING. . .JUNE 8th, 

Last Two Performances 

OF THE WONDERFUL 

MIKADO JAPANESE TROUPE, 

17 MALE AND FEMALE ARTISTS, 
Under the management of J. R. MARSHALL. 

The feats of Balancing, with the Tubs, LaCclcrs. Bam- 
boos, Screens, and Boat by the Artist YOSHIGREROO, 
ihe Yeddo Hercules, assisted by his Family of Males and 
Females, are astonishing and picturesque. 

TOROONOSKI, the Bloudin of Japan, among other 
feats, will construct a Ladder of Paper, in presence of the 
audience, ascend it, and execute a most thrilling perform- 
ance, walk with Clogs on a Swinging Bamboo, twenty 
teet long, suspended in the air, ascend a Slack Roi»e from 
the floor of the stage to the gallery, making bis descent in 
a most daring and artistic style. 

TZENAGEEROO performs the most iurredibie feat of 
walkiug a Lad ler of Swords, edge Uppermost, bare- 
footed. 

The remainder of thf- Troupe will be found equally in- 
teresting, and capable in their different acts, too numer- 
ous to mention. 

They arc acknowledged to he the most etllcicnt and ac- 
complished Troupe of the kind in Japan, and will make 
every endeavor to win the good opinion of the people of 
America during their few months sojourn. 

Dress Circle One Dollar 

Family Circle Fitly Cents 

r,a,lery Twenty-five Cents 

Box Office open from 10 to 4 o'clock. Poors open at 7 
o'clock; Performance commences at 8 o'clock. 



]yj AGUIRE'S ACADEMY OF MUSIC. 
T H E 

Second Season of 

THE 

/ T A LI JIN OP E R A 

WILL COMMENCE ON 
WEDNESDAY EVENING JUNE J'.'tb. 

During the Sea on, in addition to 
Fnnut, Linda, 

Macbeth, and 

Rlgoletto 

THE NEW OPERAS OF 
I O .V K A X D L'AFRICAHE 

Will positively be produced. 

Box Sheet for Subscribers' Seats open cverv morning, 
at 10 o'clock. 



N 0 'VICE. 
J. Branger Will Open To-Day 

THE LOUISIANA ROTISSERIE, 

DUPONT STREET, CORNER WASHINGTON. 

. r BEG TO INFORM MY FRIENDS AND 
\ thi public that TO-DAY, (SATURDAY), 
j.mo 1st, I win re-opeu the above Restau- 
rant. Everything wi.l be done to satisfy 
those who favor me with their patronage. Large Saloons 
lor parties. H use will be open all night. All orders for 
the city will be promptly attended to, and with the nt 
most care- 
Ladies' intra ice on Washington street, one door above 
Uupcnl J. BRANGER. 



]y jT ETRO POLIT A N THEATER. 
HAVE ARRIVED 

AND WILL APPEAR ON 

MONDAY EVENING JUNE 10th, 

FROM YOKOHAMA, JAPAN. 

* ....THE.... 

G r e a t Dragon Tr o up e 

....OF.... 

JAPANESE JONGLEURS, 
Equilibrists, Slack Rope Ascensionists, 
MUSICAL AND DANCING GIRLS'. 
....FROM.... 

THE GREAT DRAGON THEATER, 

O s a c a , 

C COMPRISING THE LARGEST AND MOST WONDER 
j ful Troupe of the first class male an I female Artistes 
that has ever been permitted to leave Japan. 

As a contract has been entered into with the Tycoon's 
Government tha. the Great Dragon Troupe shall be taken 
to the Paris Exhibition, their stay in San Francisco will 
be limited to only a few diys. 

F. GILBERT k CO. 



THE CENTRAL PARK OF THE PACIFIC. 

^T° 0DWARD ' S GARDENS, 

Art Gallery, 





Museum, Gymnasium 



ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. 

THESE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS ARE VISITED DAILY 
by hundred* of the pleasure seeking public, and 
all agree in pronouncing them the best and only first 
class suburban resort on the Pacific coast. 

Tne extensive grounds are covered with the rarest 
trees and shr-ibbery, making it a most desirable spot 
for small parties wishing to enjoy a Pic-Nic. 
New attractions are being constantly added. 
These Gardens are accessible by the Howard, Market 
and Folsom street cars Entrances on Mission and 
Valencia streets, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
OPEN EVEP.Y DAY. 

Admission 35 cents. Cliildren under 12 years, half 
price. 



Important Notice. 

ANOTHER DOCTOR IN THE CITY. 

BR. H. A. BENTON bas been performing many won- 
derful cures in this city the past two years, and as his 
practice is fast increasing at the ollice, finrts it difficult to 
attend outside ca!ls, concluded to invite R. H. OLM 
STEAD. M. D., of Napa City, to join him. Dr. Olmstead 
bas been 18 years successfully treati Bfl obstinate- cases, 
with water, electricity , a' d the magnetic forces, (and 
when needed, Eclectic Remedies, of which he is a gra lu- 
ate of that school) ; also, being the seventh vm of a cele- 
brated Physician , an'i hav.ug a powerful organization, 
his magnetic hands, like uia^ic, dispel pain and disease 
in a wonderful manner; he is also a natural Bone Skitm. 

DR. OLMSTEAD has this day associated with Dr. H. 
A. BENTON", the Medical Electrician and Honicepathist, 
at his ofhec, 314 Bush Bttfeetj Sin Fram isco, who, having 
all the necessary facilities, such as the Patent Electro- 
chemical, Sulphur, Vapor, Hot Air, and Medicated Baths, 
which are valuably aids in removing all curable diseases, 
whether acute or chronic. The combined ."kilt, together 
with the aid of au excellent Lady Assistant, gives an 
assurance of cuke to many, benefit to all, and quuit 

TO NONK. 

N. B.— Terras within reach of all. Oifice hours from 
9 a. m. to 8 p. m. Sundays, by appointment. 

Lodging Rooms convenient for those fr-'in'the 
couutry. 

June 1st, 1867. 



ZEITSEA & SHEPPAKD, 

Merchant Taylor s, 

NO. 610 CLAY STREET, 

Near Montgomery, 

'SAN FR A NCISCO, 



A. ROMAN & CO.'S 

MONTHLY LIST OF NEW PUBLICATION'S. 
JUNE, 1 86 7. 

Dante's Divine Comedy, translated by Longfellow— vol L 
Inferno. 

Beatrice Boville. fly '• Ou.da," Author of StralhruoTe, 
etc. 

M'Clintoek & Strong's Cyclopedia of Biblical Literature — 
vol. 1. A. 13. 

Trav.ls in the Slavonic Province of Turkey-in Europe. 

By O. Muir McKenzie and A. P. Irby. 
One Thousand familiar phrases in Englnsh and Japanese. 
St. Twel'mo— aTravesly en St. Elmo. By C H. Webb. 
Helena's House-bold— a tale o( Rome ia the First Century. 
Tbe Life of Carl Bitter. By W. L. Gage. 
Facts about Peat. By T H. Leavitt. 
Man, and the conditions that surround him. 
Ee'ays. By Dora Greeuwell. 

The Birth of Pleasure— the Story of Cupid and P*ych> . 
Tbe Romance of the Age; or, The Discovery of Gold in 

California. By Edw. E. Dunbar. 
Beet-root Sugar and Cultivation of the Beet. Bv E. U. 

Grant. 

A Trip to the Azo.-es. By Henriques. 
Thackeray's Pcndenuis; Diamond edition. 
The Lake of tbe Wood-!. By A, I. O. E 
Who wrote " Rock me to sleep, Mother?'' 
The Tourist's Map of Central Europe. 
Maga Social Papers. Putnam's Railway Classics. 
Shakings. Etchings from tbe Naval Academy. 
History of CongrcgatonaUsm. By Geo. Punchard — vol 3. 
Ellen. A Poem for the Times. 
A Sea-side Sensation. By Cha*. H. Roes. 
How to Preserve Fruit in" One Hundred Different Ways. 
O'ld Fellow's Text-Book and Manual; new edition. 
Odd Fellows' Pocket Text-Book; new edition. 
The Independent Liqunnst. By L. Monzert. 
Surgical observations with Cases. By J. Mason Warren. 
M. D. 

May-Day and other Pieces. By Ralph Waldo Emerson. 
A Som; of lli.ly. By Algernon Charles Swinburne. 
Influence of enmate in North and South America By J. 
Dteiurnell. 

The Public Debt of the Dirtcd State?. By J. S. Gibbons. 
Oliver Twist. Riverside edition. 
Nicholas Nickltby. Globe e-lition. 
Great Expectations. Author's American edition. 
American Pomology — Apples. By John A. Warder, M.D. 
Over-Sea. By Henry Morford. 
The Pioneer Churab; by Rev . M. Schuyler, D. D. 
The Celebrated Jumping Flog; by Hark Train. 
Tcgner's Fnthiof's Sa;;a. Edited bv Bayard Taylor. 
I*. S. TarilT for 1867. Compiled by E. I). Og ten. 
Honnlet" s aud Pastoral Theology : by Wm. G. T. Sbedd, 
D. D. 

How to make money and How to keep it; by Thos. A. 

Davies. 

Prometheus in Atlantis — a Prorhccy of the Extinction of 

tne Christian Civilization. 
TheChristof the Apostles' Creed : by Rev. W. A. Scott, 

D. D. 

Adventures of Daniel Ellis, the Union Guid*. 
Homespun; or, Five and Twenty Years Ago; by Thos. 
lackland. 

Bourne on Screw Propeller — part 1, new edition. 4to. 
Colburnon Locomotive Engineering — part 1. 4to. 

PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LIBRARIES SUPPLIED ON 
FAVOBABLE TERMS. 

A. ROMAN & CO., 
Booksellers, Publishers and Importers, 

Nos. 417 and 419 MONTGOMERY ST. 



Petroleum Stove- 



T 



HE ATTENTION" OF HOUSEKEEPERS AND PEOPLE 
rooming is called to the use of 

MORRILL'S 
PETROLEUM STOVES, 

Which can be used in any room with or without chim- 
neys, as 

IT EMITS NO SMOKE, SOOT OR ASHES. 

It is a superior Cook. In fact, it does all kinds of 
Stove w<Tk as well a* any (and better than most) stoves. 
It is perfectly safe. The Stale Absayor having thoroughly 
tested the-e StovcB, pronounced them non explosive. 
For sale at No. 13 Kcaruv street. 

M. B. BULLARI), Proprietor. 

M. B. B. is also agent for MORRILL'S 

UNIVERSAL OIL STOVE. 

Which burns COAL OIL, BENZINE, or NAPTHA, with 
blue liame, non-luminous, intense heat There are s.-ven 
sizes No. 1 is adapted to boiling water, heating clue, 
and Dentist's work, etc. No. 2, with Trn for hotels, sa 
loons, boardinc houses, barb- rs. etc. No. 3 to 8 Tor al> 
kinds of cookiug, which tiny do in a superior manner. 
They are as easily managed as a lamp, perfectly safe and 
economical. Tb»v can be wen and are for sale at 13 
Kearny street. 

LAMPS. 

I have PATE.* V BURNERS that can be ns- d with any 
lamp to burn Coal Oil, or the lighter product* of Petio- 
leom, witu PERFECT SAFETY, uid GREAT ECONOMY 
I I ave also a HAND LAMP (lo carry about the house) 
that wdl burn a tlaine equal lo a candle, with no more 
smoke ox odor, at an exiicn?e or ONE CENT lor EIGHT 
HOURS. 

N. B.— I am a so agent for Hock's cel -brated Self 
Generating Gas Limps. M B. BULLARI). 

Personal Tax Assessment 

ROLL OF SAN FRANCISCO-1867- (itt. 

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN IX ACCOR 
dance with Sectn-n 1 ol an Act entitled " An Act to 
provide for the Collection of Taxes < n Personal Property 
in the City and County of San Francisco," approve I 
May 9, 1862, that the Personal Property Assessment List 
has been completed aud delivered over to me a« Cl'-rk "I 
the Hoard of Supervisors, aud that the said B i rd will 
mi t a- a Boa-d of Equalization on th s the THIRD DAY 
OF .TUNE, at 7 o'clock p. m. , and continue iu sessionfiom 
time to time until the 17th day of June. 1867. for the pur 
pose of determining complaints in regard to errors of 
Assessment of Personal Property, aud correcting ermr- 
tber in. Tbe Assessment List will be open for examina- 
tion from tnis date, from 9 o'clock a. m. until 4 o'clock t- 
M., daily (Sundays excepted), during tns sitting of tbe 
Board of Equa tzation. All applications for reduction of 
assessments are requirtd to be made in wiritug and vcrW 
Red by oatb. JAS. W. BINGHAM. 

Clerk of the B'iard of Snperyiscus. 
San Francisco, June 3, 1887 




H 1 B E R N 1 A 
Smoking Tobacco, 

UNEQUALLED BY ANY IN THE MARKET. 

B. C. HORN & CO., 

FRONT STREET, CORNER OF CI AY, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

50 0,000 CIGARS 
At $5 per Thousand, 

FUR SALE BY 

B. C. HORN & CO., 

FRONT STREET, CORNER OF CLAY. 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



pACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.'R 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 
NEW YORK, JAPAN AND CHINA. 

WILL BE DISPATCHED AS FOLLOWS : 

Leave Fe-lsom street Wharf at 11 o'clock a. M. of tbe 
following dales, for PANAMA, connecting via Panama 
Railroa-i , with one of tbe Ce'mpauv's splendid steamer* 
from ASPIN WALL for NEW YORK. 

On 101b, lSih, sndfoth of each month that has 30 days. 

On 10th, 19ih, and 30th of each month that has 31 days. 

When the 101b, 19th and 30th fall on Sunday, they will 
leavo on Saturday preceding ; when the 18ih falls on Sun 
day, tbey will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco on the 10th touches at 
Mauzaoillo. All touch at Acapulco. 

Departure of 19th connects with French Transatlantic, 
company's steamer for St. Nazaire, and English 6leamcr 
for South America. 

Departure of 10th connects with English steamers for 
.-'ouiuampton and South America, aud P. R. R- Co.'a 
steamer for Central America. 

STEAMERS FOR JUNE 
Jans 10th — CONSTITUTION, Capt W. F. I.apidge, con- 
necting with R1SIM. STAR, Capt. Grav. 
.tune 18th— GOLDEN CITY, Capt J. T. Watkins, connect 

ing with ARIZONA. Capt Hams. 
■June 29tu — MONTANA, Capt. Jos. Sotton , connecting with 
OCEAN QUEr.N, (apt Maury. 

Passengers will bo berthed through. Baggage checked 
'.hrough — 100 pounds allowed each adult. 

Surgeon ou board. Medicine and attendance free. 

These steamers will positively leave at 11 o'clock. Pas 
sengcrs are requested to nave their baggage on board be- 
fore 10 o'clock 

Through tickets to Liverpool by tbe "Cunard," '• In 
man" and "National" Steamship Lines can be obtained at 
P M. S. S. Co. '8 office In San Francisco. 

For Merchandise Freignt apply to Wells. Fargo It Co. 

The splendid steamship COLORADO will be 'lispatcbed 
on July 4th, and will bo followed by tbe GREAT RE- 
PUBLIC, on August 24th. from wnari, corner of Tiret and 
Brannon streets, for YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG ; 
i onncctine at Yokohama with the steamer COSTA RICA, 
for SHANGHAI. 

F-'r Passage and all other information, apply at PaciOc 
Hail Steamship company 's office, corner of Sacramento and 
Leidisdurff streets. 

OLIVER ELDRIBGE, A K ent 



r? there is a Flor 
ence Sewing Ma- 
chine within a 
thousand miles of 
San Francisco, that 
is not giving entire 
satisfaction, if lam 
informed of it, it will 
be attended to with- 
out express charge 
or expense of any 
kind to the owner. 
Samuel Hill, Agent, 
111 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 



MERJCAN HOTEL, 
L Main street. • Pelaluma 
EMERSON" H LAMBEKTON, Proprietors 



a, - 




VOLUME VII., No. 4. 
Office, No. 5M2 Merchant street. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 15, 1867. 



TERMS, \ „ 

' ( 50 Cents 



CONTENTS: 

Original: Purity of the Language; Politicians and tlie Press ; 
Philosophy and Politics: Local Art Notes. Literary Gleanings; Dr. 
Thrall on the Episcopate ; The Bishop's Office ; Boards of Missions : 
Mr. Webb's " St. Twel'mo ;" Lowell and Longfellow : Swinburne 
Appreciated. " Lion's Mouth :" The Coming Fourth ; A Learned 
Dialogue ; The New York Clipper'* Correspondent. Dramatic 
Affairs; etc. Selected: Under Greek Fire; The Burning of Wild- 
goose Lodge; Sunday-School Address; The Nose. Paragraphs; 
Poetry, etc. 



THE OCEAN. 

T IKENESS 'of heaven ! 
-^"^ Agent of power ! 
Man is thy victim ! 
Shipwrecks thy dower ! 
Spices and jewels 
From valley and sea, 
Armies and banners 
Lie buried in thee ! 

What are the riches 
Of Mexico's mines, 
To the wealth that far down 
In tby deep water shines? 
The proud navies that cover 
The conquering west — 
Thou flingest them to death 
With one heave of thy breast. 

From the high hills that view 
Thy wreck-makiDg shore. 
When the bride nf t he mariner 
Shrieks at thy roar , 
When, like lambs in the tempest, 
Or mews in the blast, 
O'er ridge broken billows 
The canvass is cast ; 

How humbling to one 
With a heart and a soul, • 
To look on thy greatness, 
And list to thy roll ; 
To think bow that heart 
In cold ashes shall he, 
While the voice of eternity- 
Rises from thee ! 

Yes ! where are the cities 
Of Thebes and Tyre » 
Swept from the nations 
Like sparks from the tire : 
The glory of Athens, 
The splendors of Rome, 
Dissolved— and lor ever — 
Like dew iu the foam. 

But thou art almighty — 
Eternal — sublime — 
Unweakened, unwasted — 
Twin brother of time! 
Fleets, tempests, nor nations, 
Thy glory can bow ; 
As the stars first beheld tbee, 
Still chainless art thou ! 

Bnt hold ! when thy surges 

No longer shall roll, 

And that firmament's length 

Is drawn back like a scroll; 

Then— then shall the spirit 

That sighs by thee now 

Be more mighty, more lasting, \ 

More chainless than thou ! 

John ArotTSTrs Shea. 



It> -,- Yoaemlte Valley. 

The effects of the air of Yosemite on certain constitutions are ter- 
rible. This is the sort of eruption which it has produced in the case 
of a correspondent of the .d/to signing himself— orhersclf — "Yosemite." 

" Travellers are beginning to skim over the roads like winged birds, 
aud the merry jest and gay laugh go out cheerily on the golden air as 
they lope away toward the renowned mammoth trees and the grand 
Yosemite. The miner drops his shovel to gaze, and the Chinamen 
hold a noisy pow- wow as the lively* strangers dart past their gold- 
saving sluices." 

When the travellers begin to "skim," proceed to "lope" and 
finally " dart" and one of them is driven to gush in such a manner as 
does this correspondent, we cannot believe that Yosemite is a healthy 
place. • * 



Year, by Mail, in Advance 
Month, by Carrier 



THE LION'S MOUTH. 

" The gravest hoist is an ass, the gravest bird is an owl, the gravest fish 
is an oyster, and the gravesi man is a fool. " Sidney Smith. 

" I will roar, that I will do auy man's hoart good to hear me." 

A Midsummer Nioht's Dbe.i.m. 

" f will aggravate my v.)ice so, that I will roar yon as gently as any sack- 
ing dove ; I will roar you an "t were any nightingale. " Ibid. 
u Nil falsi audeat, nil veri nun audeat dicere," ClCBBO. 



A Learned Dialogue. 

Williamson Shooks, a man who has an unquenchable thirst for 
knowledge, and is moct frank in his acknowledgement of the defects 
in his education, the other day met Wilfer Wahoo, whom Shooks be- 
lieves to be a very fine scholar, and the following dialogue occurred : 

Shooks. (Catching Wahoo by tlie arm). My dear fellow ! This is, 
I might say, almost providential. I havn't seen you for six months, 
aud now I come across you at a time when you can help me out of a 
serious trouble. 

Wahoo. (A little scared, thinking, of course, that Shooks Irishes to 
borrow money of him.) Really, I'm sorry, but, Mr. Shooks, I don't 
think you could have applied to a worse man. I'm incapable— 

Shooks. No sir. There isn't a man in San Francisco so capable as 
yourself of rescuing me from the dilemma in which I at present find 
myself. I know, sir, that you can tell me the derivation of the word 
aristocracy. 

Wahoo. {Much relieved, but at tlie same time taken off his guard.) 
Oh, yes. Certainly. ''Aristocracy," originally. "Aristocracy' 
now corrupted. Of course, Shooks, you remember Ariosto was a 
great swell iu ancient times — or modern times — you know, at any rate, 
be ruled a lot of other fellows, " eracy," you know, from the Greek, 
aud then after him when a swell ruled a lot of fellows who weren't 
swells they called it Ariosto-cracy. Only a corruption 

Shooks. (Puzzled.) Is that it? 

Wahoo. (xKnki ^hook's hand nervously \ Yes, good by, Shooks 
always come to me when you're in any fix of tf..it kind. (Aside.) Oh 
dear ! It wouldn't do to confess to Shooks but I hare been desperate. 

Poor Wahoo has since this unfortunate affair been afraid to appear 
in the streets, but he in the solitude of his chamber prays that Shooks 
may receive due punishment for having been the cause of his making 
such a terrible blunder. Shooks is at the present time firmly con- 
vinced that Ariosto-cracy is the original word from which aristocracy 
was derived, but has been unable to discover whether Ario6to was an 
ancientRoman or a modern Greek. 

Tlie Coining Fourth. 

Again is Young America to be made glad by guns, pistols, cannon 
crackers, processions and an increased burthen of pocket money | 
Again will Old America be victimized and profanely deprecato the 
patriotic racket. Again is the annular procession to move, the honored 
poet of the day to sweat and groan in the preparation of his patriotic 
verse, and the vast and enthusiastic assemblage to eagerly wait foi 
the tedious and humdrum orator of the day to conclude his oraticn 
There will be ten thousand drunks. Washington, Jett'cisou and Frank 
lin will from the battlements Of heaven look on that day over a vas* 
crowd of their inebriated fellow countiymen. Again will individuals 
of aspiring tendencies be gratified by appointments as marshals, road 
ers aud other chimney pot offices peculiar to the day, whereby suffi 
cient glory and satisfied ambition will be secured them to last the 
whole year. 

Speaking of the measures necessary to ensure a general turn out, 
'he Flag asks " how can the people be got out?" We suggest that 
they be paid for turning out. We believe that the most imposing pro 
cession by far that San Francisco ever witnessed could be got up at 
{he rate of fifty cents per head. The surrounding country would then 
eagerly rush iu and take a part and draw their celebratorial perdiem 
The Chinese would, so induced, eagerly swell the patriotic throng. 
The inhabitants of the South Sea Islands, the deuizen of Oakland, aye, 
even the nnaspinug digger would in such a case, be too happy to 
march under the protection of our glorious banner. We ourselves 
would go, and enlist our children. 

The Methodist Religion. 

A certain newspaper publishes the following : 

"The use of tobacco has been prescribed by the Vermont Methodist 
Conference. Hereafter no person addicted to thiB habit will be ad 
mitted to membership." 

We have carefully re-read the ten commandments and cannot find 
" Thou shalt not smoke." However, it is just possible that the Ver- 
mont Methodist Conference took out one of the commandments — per- 
haps the shortest one — and put m this one to fill up. 

A Maniac's Longings. 

An unfortunate maniac who left on the last boat for Stockton ob- 
served to us that he would not be satisfied like Archimedes to move 
the world, but if he could get some standing point on the outside 
wonld rip up the Atlantic cable an i iiitJis for a "returning 
ball." 



A Deaf Mute on the « Alta." 

We are pleased to learn a deaf mute is to be employed as local 
editor on the Alta. The gentleman who reported the exhibition of 
the Deaf aud Dumb Asylum 6ays in speaking of its inmates ; "A 
thorough knowledge of grammar as well as of history was shown." 
This same gentleman (can it be Fitz-Smythe who has recently returned 
from Arizona ? ) who so admires grammar says: 

" About sixty were present, and they presented, collectively, a 
most pleasing appearance, and no one could look upon the assemblage 
without a strong feeling of sympathy for children deprived of attri- 
butes that only those who know the loss can comprehend, how great- 
are their value. The pity or compassion of the large audience 
was evidenced during the evening for th.» interesting class, 
and it must have been a consolatory reflection that the State has most 
liberally provided for their education and support." 

It is just possible that the present local reporter of the Alta is one 
of the inmates of the Idiot Asylum let out on a holiday. He says : 

" During the evening many bouquets were thrown upon the stage 
to testify admiration and sympathy for the excellence of the boysand 
girls, and applause— heartfelt applause — was frequently given, but 
more than one half of the pupils were unconscious of this tribute to 
their superior learnings acquired under disadvantageous circum- 
stances." 

As the deaf could see the spectators clapping their hands and the 
blind could hear the plaudits of those who liked their music the above 
statement must be taken cum granosalis. Seriously ,the Alta's English 
is becoming intolerable and were it not that Fitz-Smythe.is said to have 
returned we should be at a loss how to account for it. 

Pilgrims Bound for the Holy Land. 

In the telegraphic news we find the following paragraph : 
"Among the passengers of the Quaker City for the Holy Land 

are the two Beechers, " Mark Twain," Miss Larrowe, of California, 

Maggie Mitchell and mother." 

We are not much interested in the fact that " Miss Larrowe, of Cal- 
ifornia," has started for the Holy Land, the departure of Maggie 
Mitchell and mother disuuhes ni but little, we are slightly agitated 
at the exodus of the two Beechers, but the incursim of "Mark 
Twain " on holy ground fills us with i.,n.vn. Mark has a good sized 
hump of veneration, hut we fear the relics in the Holy Land will be 
handled by him in a manner which will bring upon him the wrath of 
the Holy Catholic Church. He would have no scruples to prevent 
his suggesting that the toe-nailsof St, Paul be boiled down forglue. We 
fear that be will insist on assaying the nail front the true cross, and 
will investigate all the relics and miraculous paintings, in a manner 
which will be thought irreverent. We trust " Mark " will remember 
that he is not in California, and will, as much as in him lies, cultivate, 
rejuvenate, and bring to a state of perfection his early religious edu- 
cation. Our hope lies in the two Beechers, aud the fact that " Mark " 
once went as a missionary to the Sandwich Islands. 

The New York " Clipper's" San Francisco Correspondent. 

Some person of the name of Allien has been interfering with the 
business of the correspondent of the New York Clipper. On this 
account the following appears iu a paper published in this city : 

" Allow me through the columns of your paper, to denounce this 
same Allien as he deserves. In the first place, he is not correspondent 
for the New York Cftp/Kr; the Clipper only employ men who can 
write the English language correct, and then the Clipper only emplov 
men who have too much honor and pride to attempt blackmailing 
people. I doubt very much that Mr. Allien is correspondent for the 
New York Mercury ; I know that when he tells people he is corres- 
pondent for the Clipper, he tells them an unmitigated falsehood. ■ 
Yours truly, Charles De Lacy. 

Correspondent N. Y. Clipper and Cincinnati Commercial." 

Mr. Charles De Lacy proves most exclusively that he — and not 
Allien — is the correspondent of the New York Clipper in this city by 
saying: "the Clipper only employ meu who can write the English 
language correct." 

A VVell-Rcgnlatcd Town. 

An exchange informs us that : A circus was lately refused permis- 
sion to exhibit in Lee, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, lest it should 
disturb the deep religious feeling now prevailing there. 

This paper forgets to mention the fact that a religious revival was 
only a short time previously nipped in the bud in consequence of the 
circus having arrived one day before the revival. Lee, Berkshire 
County, Massachusetts is one of the best regulated towns in the whole 
United States. All the children have the measles at the same time, 
all the people experience religion at the same time, and the only rea- 
son that the above mentioned circus was not allowed to play was that 
it arrived just at the time when all the people had spent their money 
and begau tfi feel religi-ons. 

It Might be Worse. 

The Alta complain? that " the female who delights in wearing pan- 
taloons " is now wearing a different colored dress. It says : 

" The color of the unmentionables was drab, aud they looked no 
only uuseemly, but disgusting." 

Probably if the lady bad appeared in " her buff " the effect would 
have been still more unseemly. 



2 



The Californian 



THE BURNING OF WILDGOOSE LODGE (COUNTY 
LOUTH.) 

ABOUT nine o'clock on a wild October night. 181G (the 
year after Waterloo), a lonely little chapel at Stonetown- 
in the county Louth, many long miles from Dundalk, is filled 
by a mysterious party of about forty men, wrapped in the 
rough heavy-caped frieze greatcoats of the ordinary Irish peas- 
ants, and armed with rude, guns, horse-pistols, bludgeons, old 
gun-barrels set in pistol-stocks, and pitchforks. The men look 
Bavage, pale, and worn ; many of them have ridden from great 
distances — from outlying villages in Meath, Cavan, and Mon- 
aghan. There are farmers and fishermen from the coast, 
blacksmiths, artisans, and farming lads, men of all ages and 
classes ; their brows are knit, their mouths are compressed by 
the sense of a horrible secret about which they mutter under 
breath. They have met for no midnight mass. They are 
bent on no pilgrimage to Croagh Patrick, or the entrance of 
Purgatory, on the island of Lough Deargh. No Priest is on 
his way to exhibit the host to these pertrubed men. The 
sacred bell will not tinkle that night within that roadside 
chapel, nor the crucifix be raised above their heads by a robed 
minister of God. They have not the air of men who come 
to kneel or who wish to unburden their souls before the holy 
altar. They are bent on work to further which either the Vir- 
gin, the saint, or the angels can be invoked. They are looking 
at the hammers and triggers of pistols ; they are loading guns ; 
they are fixing and sharpening bayonets with hideous smiles 
of cruel meaning. They are cursing the boys of Drumbridge 
and Eonisheen for being late, and cheering the gosoons of 
King's Court and Ballyuavorneen for being early, though they 
had to come through the bogs on foot. 

It is not difficult to sketch the place of the Itibbonmen's 
meeting — a plaiu whitewashed little chapel, with a strip of 
green before the door, and inside the railings a large irou 
cross, with the emblems of the Passions attached to it by a 
crown of thorns. The interior of the dimly lit building is 
plain and poor, a timber roof, whitened walls, with here and 
there a stariDg colored picture of the Virgin or St. Patrick, 
or a list of. services or pilgrimages, a few rough chairs and 
benches, at the east end a deal platform, upon which the priest 
paces up and down while he delivers his sermon. On this 
platform stands the altar with the receptacle for the host — a 
plated sort of watch-case surrounded by metal rays. There 
are a few horn-books and dog's-eared primers, and there is a 
cane lying in the window ; for Stonetown being a poor place, 
the school is held in the chapel, and all day the parish clerk 
and schoolmaster, Pat Devan, has been beating into the 
barefooted, quick, ragged peasant childreu scraps of dog Latin, 
dreary sections of the multiplication-table and fragments of 
Irish grammar. Those black sods lying in a heap by the low 
smouldering fire of red-hot peat are the fees that each boy 
brings daily to pay for his rough schooling. The chapel is 
hot, reeking and close, for it has not been opened since the 
classes left. 

Mr. Devan is held by the country people, the peat-cutters, 
and ploughmen of Stonetown and Reagstown, to be a prodigy 
of learning. The only wonder is, that he never went to carry 
off all the prizes at Mayuooth, or to astonish the learned Je- 
suits at St. Omer. He can read the breviary in Latin, and 
can repeat the prayers for the dead almost as well as 
Father Murphy. He knows the Hours by heart, and can re- 
cite long poems in Irish. He can hardly ask you how you 
are, or how the wife and childen are, without bringing in the 
Latin. No one prostrates himself lower or with more sol- 
emnity when the bell rings and the host is elevated ; no oue 
iu Louth has gone more pilgrimages, or performed more sta- 
tions. No one can tell you more about the Holy Father, and 
the great ceremonies at Rome ; and whist ! he is one of us ; 
he is in all the secret societies. It is in this chapel the Rib- 
bonmen meet and discuss their plans of attacking houses for 
arms, to be ready for the next rising. He denounces trai- 
tors and spies. He know when Meath is ready, Monaghan is 
up, when Cavan is troubled, when Louth has got something 
on its mind. As he is the clerk of the parish as well as 
schoolmaster, he keeps the key of the chapel, so that no one 
but those who ought to know it, need know of the meetings 
of the Whiteboys or the United Irishmen. The halo of the 
priesthood surrounds him also ; he is at once respected and 
feared. The village priest, a worthy, portly, easy man, may or 
may not wink at these political meetings. At all events, he 
is not here to-night, but is no doubt by his own cozy fire, 
warming his toes and reading one of the Fathers near a table 
on which pleasantly steams a reasonable quiet glass of whisky- 
punch ; or he is thinking of his pleasant college days, as he 
watches the last bit of peat burn clear and blue in the frugal 
little grate. 

It is indeed a violent troubled night for a rendezvous ; one 
of those nights when the fir-trees writhe and'struggle with 
the wind, the oaks rock angrily, and the elms lash the air in a 
restless despair. The wind is tearing off the dead leaves by 
sheaves at a time. Dead leaves dry and crackle down every 
laDe. Clouds of yellow leaves break out of sudden corners, 
and fill the air for a moment, before they scatter in utter dis- 
comfiture over the loose stoue walls and the lonely miles of 



mountain, moor and bog. The wind hag demoniacal outbursts 
of anger that relapse into shrewish cries at keyholes, fretful 
rattliugs at shutters and doors, hollow moans and shuddering 
vibrations down chimneys. If ever the devils wander in the 
darkness prompting hopeless men to despair, urging bad men 
to murder and to cruelty, and rejoicing at the growth and 
progress of wickeduess wherever planning or accomplishing, 
this is the night that should bring them on such ghastly 
journeys, such is the storm that should shroud and cover them 
in their exulting search, leaving behind, a wake of wreck, 
death, and destruction. 

Devan goes round to the men in the chapel, the fresh- 
colored Btripliugs and the old scarred wicked-looking rascals 
who fought in 'Ninsty-eight, and gives them the sign and 
countersign of the night. There is not much said above a 
whisper, but the gestures, at which they laugh hideously, 
seem to typify gibbets with men hanging, and prayers offered 
up for such men. Then Devan takes a peat from the fire, 
blows sparks Irom the lighted end, and waves it over his head- 
There is a suppressed shout and a wave of guns and pitchforks, 
as some one produces a bottle of whisky and an egg shell ; 
the fiery liquor is passed round, till the eyes of the consp ira- 
tors begin to glitter, and a cruel alacrity inspires the tired 
men, whom Devau now selects and divides into two bands. 
Theu, carrying the lighted turf, Devan lead* them into the 
road in a rough military order, and carefully locks the chapel 
door behiud him. They march from that chapel by the Mill 
of Louth almost silently. Are they merely goiug to drill, or 
are they going to attack some farmer's house? Many do not 
yet know ; all that many know is that they have been called 
Irom the forge and plow, the fishing-boat aud tbeshibbeen, on 
some secret errand of the Ribboumen committee, and that 
they dared not refuse to come. But Devan and M'Cabe, 
Marron aud M'Elarney, they know, for they are the leaders, 
aud every one will soon know. Through the ranks from 
time to time spread the words, " Remember, boys, who hung 
Tierney, Coulan aud Shanley ; we must show no mercy to 
them that showed none " Then there roll along a ground- 
swell of deep curses and execrations in Irish, as Devan waves 
the turf torch, that glows scarlet in the wind. 

In the meantime, other bands are converging to the same 
spot. A party of men, with guns, pistols, aud loaded sticks, 
have come from the cross-roads of Correcklick, where others 
have joined them ; again, at the cross-roads of Ballyuavoreen, 
others have come riding up smiling and shouting ; at the 
cross roads of Dumbride there have also beec recruits ; ana 
even at Churchtowu there was one armed man waiting. At 
Churchtown, the men on foot, knowing the country every 
" shap " aud dyke, leap away to lieaghstowu Chapel, the near 
way across the fields, but the horsemen (many ridiug double) 
ride to Reaghstown by the road to Tullykeel. 

There are near upon a hundred now ; savage-looking fellows, 
many of them with bad foreheads, high cheek-boues, and coarse 
cruel mouths, ready for any crime. They are near the place 
of action; at Arthurstown Chapel more whisky is produced ; 
they maddeu themselves with driuk ; for there is work to do, 
aud there may be fighting, if the dragoons come down on them. 
The tierce fellow who leads the Reaghstown detachment boasts 
that he has a party that can be relied on, aud he goes to 
Campbell, who brought up the men from Dumbride, and. flour- 
ishing a pistol, swears that if any of either party flinch he will 
blow their brains out. 

Beyond Reaghstown Chapel the country gets very wild, and 
there is oue narrow swampy lane which horses can hardly 
traverse. There is one small farm-house on a piece of rising 
land ; at this season almost surrounded by water, it is only ap- 
proachable (except in a boat) by the narrow pass leading from 
the south side of Reaghstown Chapel lane. The bog is a wild 
mournful, desolate place, much like any other of the five milliou 
acres of bog that give a mournful monotonous character to 
Irish scenery ; wide tussocky tracKs, untouched since the 
Deluge, great thorny lumps of furze, tangled nets of bramble, 
giant hillocks of rush, tufts of coarse dead grass, acres of 
heather; deep treuches are cut in the madder-colored peat 
earth for drainage, from which the snipe darts and zig-zags 
when you approach ; little black peat-stacks ; these form the 
only landmarks to break the melancholy level, or here and 
there a little heap of coarse reedy grass ; everywhere, by the 
dark chocolate slices dug but yesterday, or the dustier and 
more friable sections of the older workings, the wild cotton 
scatters its delusive little tufts of suowy filament, with which 
the wild duck will line its random nest. In the prairies, in 
the virgiu forests, in the jungle, among the icebergs, between 
the glaciers, there is nothing so desolate and repulsive as an 
Irish bog, though beneath it lies the inexhaustible wealth of a 
soil whose riches have been accumulating since the Flood, and 
which needs only the magic touch of Hope and Industry to 
spring and blossom into plenty. 

Such spots, colonised by needy, energetic, and venturous 
men, are dreary enough, even under a bright sun and pure 
sky ; but in autumn, on a howling restless night, tbey are per- 
| fectly purgatorial in their dismal and deserted barrenness ; 
tbey seem the end of the world, and outside all civilization. 
Such may have been the aspect of the earth when the dragon 



lizards, those disbelievers in progress, dominated alone, and 
trampled as conquerors over their muddy dominion. 

In the lane leading to this bog stood a laborer's bouse. 

A man named Pat Halfpenny and bis wife lived there. 
They were sittiug by the fire talking over the events of the 
day, and listining to the wind that, swelling and raging, then 
wearing down to a tired lull, seems all at once to give birth 
to strauge sounds like the voices of advanced men and the 
trampling and splashing of horses' feet. The wife clings to 
ber husband ; tbey tremble ; for the fear of death IB upon 
them, and their hearts beat so loud that they can hear the 
beating almost as clearly as that of the clock which ticks on 
the wall. A moment after, there comes an imperative tap at 
the door — the knock of men who will force their way in if 
tbey are not instantly admitted. Two stern men, one of them 
with a gun, enter, the moment the door is tremblingly opened ; 
without speaking, they go up to the hearth ; taking a little 
pot, they put three or four red-hot peats in it, and are about 
to go off with them. The poor woman falls on her kDees, 
clasps her bands, and prays them not to take the fire away at 
such an hour. She does not know what it is for, bat she sus- 
pects some horrible revenge. The men push her away angrily. 
The one with the gun says to Halfpenny ; 

" If we hear a word from you or your wife, we'll drag you 
out ; if you dare to look after us, you spalpeen, I'll blow the 
shot in this gun-through you." 

Tbey then leave a sentry at the door, and go on toward 
Lynch's, another house further on. Halfpeuuy, listening in in- 
tense fear, presently hears a clamor of talking, sbootintr, and 
mustering, and theu the tramp of horses. 

When the sound has gone by, and Halfpenny thinks all is 
safe, and opens his door to go and call Sis neighbor, Carrol , 
he hears a fierce voice in the darkness that tells him to shut 
the door or he will be shot. 

There is no disguise uow about the Ribbonmen's intention. 
They are going to attack a lone house, called Wildgoose 
Lodge, inhabited by a farmer named Edward Lynch, who at 
the last Louth summer assizes prosecuted the three Ribbon - 
men, Tierney, Coulan, and Shanley, for breaking into his bouse 
to obtain arms. The resistance had been desperate. The 
prisoners were unmistakably identified, and were coDvicted 
and executed at Duudalk, to the open horror and indignation 
of the Ribbon societies. Lynch's son-in-law, Thomas Rooney, 
and a laboring boy, named James Rispin, were the chief wit - 
nesses. 

In that lone house on the bog, they are busy at work, or 
sitting singing and laughing round the fire, while supper is 
preparing : Lynch and his wife, his brave son-in-law, James 
Rispin, auother laborer, Elizabeth Richards a servant, And 
auother w,oinan, and a child. 

Devau and Malone, the captains of the two bands, have 
spread their men, according to order, to the right and left 
round the hill on which the doomed house is ; they are clos- 
ing in upou their victims, with guns and pistols ready. Tin- 
lighted peat, roused by the wind and waviug to and fro, breaks 
into a blaze, and is a moving signal for the circle of Ribbon- 
meu. Their cruel object is to preveut any of the hated Lyu- 
ches from running dowu to the water aud escaping in the 
darkness by swimming and wading to the land, or hiding in 
the heather clumps on the bog. Gologly aud other men, left 
in the lane to hold the horses, laugh aud dance as they see the 
circle formed. M'Elarney has refused to help hold the horses, 
sayiug he is as fit to go to the burning as any man there. 

The sound of voices has by this time aroused the Lynch 
family. They look out, they see the moving light and hear 
the threalcniug sounds that cau only -mean mischief. They 
guess in an instant that the Ribbonmen are on them, to re- 
venge their three dead comrades. Rooney snatches down his 
gun aud prepares for defence. Some rash and bolt the hall 
door. The assailants make a charge at it with their gun- 
butts and strong shoulders. A voice from within cries : 

" The first that comes in or out, I 'll shoot him I" 

Devan answers hoarsely through the darkness, the fire glar- 
ing on his face, so that it even more than usually resembles an 
evil spirit's : 

" Don't think it is old times with you, Rooney ; this night 
is your doom." 

There is no more Baid, bat several shots flash from the win- 
dows, and a man named Keerau is burned in tbe face by the 
powder of one- discharge. The Ribbonmen fall back, and do 
not again attempt to force an entrance. Devan and MaloDe 
then cry out to'fire the house at the back. With a savage ea- 
gerness the wretches run to the hay-yard, aud collect great 
heaps of dry flux, untbrashed oats, and straw. The two men 
who fetched fire from Halfpenny's — determined men, and one 
of them a robber by profession — are ordered to light a bundle 
of flax and thrust it into the thatch of the roof. There is a 
crackliog, a glare, a blaze, that showsjit once the ring of red 
howling faces, and makes tbe bayonets and gun-barrels gleam 
crimson. Devan cries : 

" We will show the country boys that there shall be no in- 
formers allowed in it." 

The fire spreads over the roof with dreadful rapidity, flash, 
ing from end to end, with a crackling roar and fierce volumes 



The Californian 



of reddened smoke. In a few minutes a sheet of water, 
which almost insulates the house, seems turned into a sea of 
blood, the windows glitter in the blaze, add the glass snaps 
and falls. Through the horrible glare, the ring of rejoicing 
wretches must seem to the unhappy creatures within like a 
circle of exulting devils. 

Nothing but God's voice from heaven or the avenging bands 
of Angles can save the Lynches now. Devan's party know 
it, and dance and toss up their brimless hats, and wave their 
guns and pitchforks, with the ferocity of cannibals. The poor 
women, too, and the children, what have they done? What 
do they know of prosecutions and Ribbonmen conspiracies — 
they who were defended so bravely by Lynch and Rooney 
when they fought for their lives against the midnight thieves ? 
Perhaps, even now, tearing themselves from the groaning 
women and screaming children. Lynch, Roooey, Rispin, and 
his fellow-servant, may load their guDS to the muzzle, sharpen 
some knives for their belts, and, throwing open the door, turn 
mad and rush down on these murderers. If they fail to break 
through the circle, they may at least kill some, and die bravely. 

But there is no time for this ; the farmer has his wife in his 
arms, Roooey has his little child crying for help, the farm-ser- 
vants have their sweethearts clinging to them, and praying 
hysterically for mercy — clinging with the agony and despair of 
drowning creatures. The burning timbers of the root' and 
the masses of blazing thatch fall on them, and set theirclothes 
on fire, the house glows like a furnace, the fire starts in at the 
windows, the walls are growing red hot, the beds and chairs 
and floor are breaking out into flame3. The men and women 
fly past the windows, from this corner to that, like terrified 
animals in a burning forest ; their cries pierce and rend the 
air. 

The only answer their murderers give, is a shout : " Let 
none survive ; not one must live to tell of it!" And they 
pile more straw on the roof. The sky over the lonesome 
ewamp gets redder— redder, and men far away at Audee and 
Enniskeen see it aid know what is being done. 

Bryan Lemmou, one of Devan's gang, springs forward with 
a pouderous sledge-hammer, and toling like a Titan, drives in 
and shatters the hall door with a dozen crushing blows. The 
bayonets and guns move nearer ; will Devan's men rush into 
this furnace, and slay all they meet ? No, their hatred is now 
too intense and fiendish for such a shortening of their sport. 
A dozen of them bring armfuls of flax and oat straw, and 
push them blazing into the rooms. The hay-yard furnishes 
the funeral pile for its unhappy owner. So do the stables, 
where the horses kick and plunge, maddened by the heat and 
noise and glare. 

The women and children fly from room to room, up stairs 
and down. They crouch, they hide, they pray, they scream, 
and their screams are heard far beyond the flame, far into the 
darkness, scaring the heron and the fox. The wretched 
Lynch's well-known form is seen crossing a window, and Devau 
gives orders to fire at him. He cannot resist tha*. order, 
though it rather shortens the boy's fun. They fire, but he 
does not fall. A more terrible death awaits liiin. Lynch is 
seen no more. The lad Rispin, younger and more passion- 
ately eager for life, clambers on to a oide-wall, from which the 
roof is now burnt away, aud supplicates for mercy. Mercy \ 
Ask a shark for mercy when he turns to snap, or a wolf after 
a second bite at the lamb. The auswer is a dozen clashing 
bayonets in his side and back ; and he topples, screaming, 
headlong into the seething caldron of flame. 

Bursts of fire and smoke from the windows ; one thrilling 
scream, a thrill shriek from a child ; then a deep aud terrible 
silence. The house glows like a red-hot crucible. Look iu 
at the windows and you see only a raging volume of flame. At 
last the red rafters of the roof fall in, crashing and snapping 
a storm of sparks glitters before the wind, a gust of flame 
rises up, then a tall pillar of illuminated smoke. The fire 
abates, and settles down over the eight poor murdered people. 
Devan and his men discharge their guns in noisy joy, the cir- 
cle ot one hundred monsters toss their hats, huzza, and cry : 

" Lynch, we wish you luck of your hot bed." 

Malone and another man say, as they go : 

" All is well now, if we only had Mr. Fligate" (the Louth 
magistrate, who tried the three Ribbonmen whom poor Lynch 
had convicted). 

It has been a glorious night's work for the Ribbonmen. 
When they leave the house — an hour ago so cheerful, now a 
charred vault — Campbell shouts to Gologly and the others, 
who have been holding the horses in the boggy part of the 
lane. 

" We burned the little ones as well as the big ones, and left 
do one to tell the story ; Begor ! Lynch and Rooney won't 
go and inform against us again." 

This very Gologly to whom he thus spoke betrayed Camp- 
bell, and brought him to the gallows. 

Early in the morning, after this dreadful event, a man named 
Owen Reilly, whose cabin is about four miles from Lynch's 
house, hears vioces in the road, and, being alarmed, barricades 
his door. A body of armed men at that hour cau mean no 
good. There is a loud and angry rapping, but he is still un- 
willing to open, till the voices insist on it, assuring him that 



no harm is meant to anybody in that house. They merely 
want something to eat and drink. Reilly opens the door, and 
sees some savage-looking, smoke-blackened men, who call for 
oaten bread and a bowl of milk. They are sullen, tired, and 
one of them has a black scorched wound on his face. That is 
Keeran, whom Lynch had wounded. 

Next day the ruin of poor Lynch's house is visited by half 
the country-side. Mr. Filgate rides over and inspects with 
horror the four blackened walls, and the charred and ghastly 
remains of the eight murdered people. The peasants stand 
silently round, in secret sorrow or secret approval. The sun- 
shine falls on the white ashes of the roof, the broken door, and 
the trampled garden strewn with half-burned straw. 

The crowd opens and part, when an old woman, bowed with 
grief, and tossing her arms like a keener at an Irish funeral, 
comes to look at the black mummies that so short a time ago, 
were human beings. She recognizes two of them — her son 
whose shoulder, with a birth-mark on it, is still unconsumed ; 
and Biddy Richards, one of the maid-servants. The rest she 
cannot guess at, they are 60 dreadfully burned. Poor Rooney 
is found sitting be3ide his wife, with the blackened body of 
his fine little boy, only five months old, sheltered between his 
knees. The sledge-hammar lies ou the grass near the door, 
and the garden is littered with straw and flax. 

There are too many people in this horrible conspiracy for 
the whole to reman long undiscovered. Devan is at once 
seized. It is noticed that a neighbor named M'Cabe is not 
among the people who flock to see the ruins of Lynch's house, 
A laborer, named Greenan, who goes, to Liswinny to tell Mr. 
Filgate, the magistrate, of the events, is told M'Cabe is lame, 
and confined to the the house with a " touch me not," or boil 
on the knee. But Alice Rispin sees him, two days after the 
fire, vaulting over a ditch, and in perfct health, and soon after 
an informer deposes to his having been seen at the fire. 

Approvers soon come in, tempted by the reward of fifteen 
hundred pouuds — not very reputable men — generally thieves 
or outlaws — but still clear and consistent in their stories, al| 
witnesses of the crime, all active sharers in its accomplish- 
ment. The first, Bernard M'llroy, was once a soldier in the 
Meath militia. He informs to Mr. Filgate. He had been 
forced into the business by Devan, aud had not dared to refuse 
to help burn Wildgoose Lodge. A second approver, Peter 
Gologly, who was in jail for a murder, held the horses in the 
lane, saw the blaze, heard the shots fired, and the huzzaing. 
Michael Kernau, a third approver, will confess afterwards that 
he knows nothing, except on hearsay from M'llroy, who told 
him they should share some seven thousaud pounds reward. 
Thomas Gnbby, another approver, is a thief ; Patrick Murphy, 
the last approver, is under sentence to be hanged at Trim as 
as a thief and murderer when he comes forward as a witness 
against the men by this time seized and thrown into prison. 

These wretches were tried before the Honorable Justice 
Fletcher at the Louth Lent assizes, held in Dundalk on the 
5th, 6th, and 7th of March, 1817, for the burning of Edward 
Lynch and his whole family of eight persons. 

Serjeant Joy, in opening the case with much force and elo- 
quence, "deplored the wretched state of depravity into which 
the lower orders of people in this country seemed to have fal- 
leu. No sooner did an honest individual seek redress of in- 
juries from the impartial laws of his country, than an infernal 
conspiracy was entered into for his ruin. The unfortunate 
Lynch had evinced his courage and honesty in the prosecution 
of these ruffians, and was therefore devoted to destruction. A 
conspiracy was immediately entered iuto to deprive him of 
his life. Villains fron the north from the south, from the east 
and from the west ; from the counties of Monaghan, Louth, 
Cavan, and Meath ; all combined in a diabolic conspiracy to 
assassinate the man who had dared to appeal to the laws of 
his country for protection and redress. It was a remark 
worthy of attention, that religious parties bad nothing to do 
with this most horrible transaction, murderers and the mur- 
dered were of the same religion — all Catholics. It was 
founded upon an utter abhoreuce of all law, of all distributive 
and impartial justice." 

The three first prisoners, M'Cabe, Keeran (the man with 
the black wound), and Campbell we re first found guilty. They 
received the sentence of death with a savage and sullen obdu- 
racy. • 

Next day, Craven, Marron, Gainer, Malone, LenDan and 
Butler were also found guilty, and sentenced to death ; the 
judge ordering their bodies to be delivered over to the 
surgeons for dissection. On the verdict being passed, the 
murderers broke out into a clamorous protest of adjurations 
aud curses. Their hard and cruel faces showed with how lit- 
tle remorse they would have thrown the judge and jury into 
flames. They would scarsely be pacified or induced to listen 
to the judge's address, jn which he twice broke down, over- 
come by the poignancy of his feelings. Before the sentence 
of death was finished, Malone seized a Testament which lay 
near him, and swore in the name of God and the Virgin that 
he was innocent. The crier snatching it from his hand, he 
broke into shouts and curses against the judge, the jury and 
the police. He was removed still pouring forth those black, 
bitter, semi-Oriental imprecations with which the Irish lan- 
guage abounds' 



The next day, three other prisoners were also found guilty. 
During bis cross-examination, Murphy, the approver, confessed 
that, as a Ribbonman, he was sworn to obey his brethren to 
the utmost of his power, and that if ever again at liberty he 
would do the same under similar circumstances. 

In summing up, Judge Fletcher said : 

" The crime with which the prisoners stood charged was 
perhaps the most enormous which had ever come before him 
in his judicial capacity. How it was proved it was for them 
to decide. Ho knew (he said) that they would fully dis- 
charge their duty." 

His lordship then exhorted the jury to consider the whole 
business dispassionately and maturely. If they entertained any 
doubt, the prisoners at the bar were to have the full benefit of 
that doubt. Such is the beneficial spirit of that law, which 
the wretched and infatuated people who have perpetrated the 
crimes in question have sought to destroy. 

Thejury retired for a short time aud found a verdict of 
guilty. 

An indescribable scene ensued. The most dreadful impreca- 
tions burst forth from the wretched prisoners. M'Elarney, 
an old and malignant convict, vented his rage by cursing the 
counsel who had pleaded against him, and by frequently inter- 
rupting the judge in pronounciug the awful sentence of death. 
" I don't care ! I don't care what you do with me ! " was the 
incessant cry of the inhuman miscreant. 

The ten murderers were hung at Dundalk on the 9th of 
March. The ninety other villains who had danced round the 
funeral pile of the Lynches escaped. 

In his charge at Armagh, immediately after these executions, 
Judge Flecher gave a history of the by-gone persecutions 
of the Catholics of Armagh by the Oranagemen and Break of 
Day men, who had ruthlessly driven thousands of persons from 
the country, or, to use their own cruel language, " to hell or 
Connought." These wonton and unprovoked persecutions, 
unchecked by the magistrates, magnified by designing and 
traiterous persons, had led to the fatal origination of the Rib- 
bonmen's associations and subsequently to the deplorable re- 
bellion of 'Ninety-eight, with all its attendant atrocities and 
cruel massacres. 

The excellent and wise judce concluded with a few sentences 
which were as thoughtful as they were true. " No good," he 
said. " can accure to you from the prosecution of your neigh- 
bors who may believe a little more or a little less, who may 
worship God in a different temple, or with different observ- 
ances. The law knows no difference, regards no distinction of 
color or pretension. For myself, I think it right to say to you, 
gentlemen, that I regard all these associations as illegal. I 
care not what the body, whether green or orange, nor what 
the pretence, nor what the profession— all, 1 say, are illegal." 

It is in crimes like this burning of Wildgoose Lodge that 
we see the darker side of ths fine Irish character, its impetu- 
ous courage turned into cruelty, its deep religious feeling into 
fetish superstition, its pining for liberty into secret and cow- 
ardly conspiracy. Can we wonder that such crimes as this 
and the Scullabogue, Wexford, and Vinegar-hill massacres, 
forced the English into severity and repression? 

Not Weighed. — The Salem Register hears that a man 
called at a provisions store iu that city, a few days since, and 
dickered a considerable time about the price of some small 
article he purchased, soon after his departure the proprietor 
missed a fine leg of ham. A few hours later a boy wa3 sent 
to the customer's house to say that his master wished that 
ham returned, as it was not weighed. The unsuspecting wife 
(her husband happened to be out) immediately gave the ham 
to the messenger, who carried it back to the store. It is pre- 
sumed it is not weighed yet, as it has not been sent back. 

iNtimes of good fortune it is easy to appear great— nay, even 
to act greatly; but in misfortune, very difficult. The greatest 
man will commit blunders in misfortune, because the want of 
proportion between his means and his ends progressively in- 
creases.and his inward strength is exausted in fruitless efforts. 

Compensation— God made the strong eagle to face the mn 
unwinkingly, to live up in the high, dreary clouds; but he made 
also the beautiful flower-world, and the happy floating butter- 
fly, and the sweet, warm atmosphere of the brilliant garden 
part of the globe. 

Grief knits two hearts iu closer bonds than happiness ever 
can ; and commom sufferings are far stronger links than com- 
mon joys. 

It is better to need relief than to want the heart to give it. 
Angry friendship is not unfrequently as bad as calm 
enmity. 

Without confidence, friendship is but a mockery, and social 
intercourse a sort of war in disguise. 

The sunshine that makes the grass green and beautiful, nur- 
tures and invigorates the snake in it. 

The greatest miracle ever wrought by love is the reforma- 
tion of a coquette. 



4 



The Californian. 



LITERARY GLEANINGS. 

DR. THRALL OK THE EPISCOPATE. 

WE have already made mention of a publication in pamph- 
let form, entitled " The Episcopate the Missionary 
Order of the Church, " the authorship of which is attributed to 
the Rev. S. C. Thrall, formerly rector of Trinity Church in 
this city, and who enjoys as high a reputation in his denomin- 
ation, for theological and ecclesiastical learning, as Vinton 
and Ewer do for pulpit eloquence. As Dr. Thrall has numer- 
ous warm friends and admirers in this city, who will feel in- 
terested in anything that emanates from his peu, and as only a 
small number of copies of his essay are in San Francisco, we 
publish a few extracts. 

The following contains some principles bearing indirectly 
upon such cases as the one that has recently beeu the subject 
of much discussion in this diocese : 

" How little idea the Church has of the dignity, use, res- 
ponsibility and discretion of Bishops, may be seen by noting 
the small measure of protection with which their several fields 
of labor are preserved, to be cultivated according to their judg- 
ment. They are carefully protected from each other, so that 
jio Bishop can invade another's jurisdiction by official acts. 
The provision is wise, and might wisely be extended, by leav- 
ing them free to ordain their own clergy, 6uited to their pe- 
culiar fields of labor, instead of compelling them to accept 
every peripatetic priest or deacon who comes with a letter 
which certifies his Bishop's ignorance of auy just liability ' to 
evil report for error in religion or viciousness of life,' and who- 
has been ordained not by reasou of his fitness lor some particu- 
lar field of duty, but because he has lived through a period of 
candidateship, and, by the amiability of a standing committee, 
and the indulgence of examiners, has found himself standing 
before a Bishop, about to hold an ordination. Then a Bishop 
of an organized diocese is protected against the invasion of 
the Board of Missions in the selection of stations and the 
Ending missionaries into his jurisdiction ; but he has no power 
to hinder the selection of any presbyter in his diocese, and as- 
signing him to any missionary station. This measure of pro- 
tection, too, is accorded only to a diocesan Bishop. Mission- 
ary Bishops, though not created or selected by the board, are 
turned over to it as soon as consecrated, become their agents, 
and have only advisory power in the missionary work of their 
jurisdiction. They report to the board — and worse, their pres- 
byters do the same, and this not through their Bishops, but di- 
rectly, and so are much more the priests of the board than of 
their Bishops. Thus missionary Bishops become a convenient 
appendage, and first class agency of the board. When men 
learn the value of order and subordination by the stern disci- 
pline of war, they fall into no such blunders, and show due and 
proper respect to official station. Finally, Bishops of ail kinds 
are canonically unprotected against the harmful intrusions of 
self-constituted societies, by euphemism called voluntary, who 
may map out a diocese, plant missionaries, and direct their 
operatious after their own indiscreet willfulness. Canonically 
unprotected we say, for the Church declaring herself a mis- 
sionary society, and appointing an agency for the direction of 
her missionary work, all other organizations are lawless, irregu- 
lar, void of right, and to be shunned alike by men of honor 
and ofhonesty. This declaration and appointment protects 
sufficiently against the intrusion of a gentleman. But not all 
members of the Church are gentlemen, and the grace of or- 
ders does not supply the defect of nature more than other?. 
It might therefore be well to inquire if some protective legisla- 
tion is not demanded." 

Dr. Thrall argues that the missionary work is peculiarly 
that of the Bishop — the missionary work, that is, not iu the 
modern, but in the Apostolic sense : 

THE BISHOP'S OFFICE AND ITS TOILS. 

" The Bishop is indeed to reach all the people in his juris- 
diction, but Dot in one day or one year, or one man's life > 
but after an economy, as the apostles were to preach the 
Gospel to all the world. This is the work in which he is 
chiefly to engage. He is to administer discipline too in his 
eee, to ordain, to confirm, visit aud inspect his clergy and their 
work, be to them a guide, counselor, friend, father. He must 
teach the teachers. This is part of his work, because he is 
personally responsible to God for all the work of the Church. 
But this should so be done as not forgetting or neglecting the 
peculiar apostolic work of going forth discipling and gathering 
jn from the world those who know not Christ in His body, the 
Church. As this is a wore peculiar to his office, committed to 
no other, it cannot be too much to ask that, at the least, one" 
half of his time should be given to that one work ; that his visi- 
tation of his diocese should be not merely holding confirmations 
in organized parishes, but that an equal portiou should go to 
the world ; that he should personally survey and examine all 
the unoccupied field ; and after the manner of St. Paul, select- 
ing the largest, most promising fields, places which are centers 
of influence to an outlaying country, in one of these, attended 
by his deacon, do the missionary work of his opostolic office, 
till, if the ground proves fruitful, the Church is well estab- 
lished. This is to go to the world and preach the Gospel. 
This is his commission. Not merely to preach to the Churches. 
How little this is in the mind of the Church it is sad to think. 
In what conventional address does one hear an account of such 
■work in a new field. The Bishop who shall furnish such a 
record will furnish what this age so much seeks, a new sensa- 
tion, and distance all novelists. We were unfortunately planted 
by England in reverse order, and are not yet done backing 
into position. Of generalities we have abundance : ' There 
remains yet very much land to be possessed '—general appeals 
for men and means — statements of fact sufficiently obviou3 to 



all, and not remarkable for freshness, novelty or force. But 
where is the leader's bugle call which tells of careful exami- 
nation, well selected field of contest, nights of prayer, and toil 
of muscle and sinew and brain day after day, waging, as the 
appointed leader, the Master's battle till a new post is gained 
and garrisoned. We mean not that the Bishops are idie. They 
work hard enough ; but, for the most part, in a treadmill, going 
a weary round of perfunctory duties. In the present method 
to the Church they are the pack-horses of the Christain 
camp, to bear all sorts of rubbish cast on them to lighteu 
other's loads. They come as gleaners. If there is any thank- 
less, heartless, weary work in the Church, it is a Bishop's 
office as the tyrant custom makes it now. The Bishop leads 
not, he cannot lead. In a small diocese be often does a 
pries'ts duty alone in the largest parish, flitting oft" on week 
days as he my to hold a hurried visitation, and back to his 
priest's work again. In the large sees he plans by night how 
he may divide his days to give three hours each to parishses, 
on the average, and get a hurried lunch aud catch a trail? by 
which to fill the gaps between the services, and still make time 
for necessary correspondence." 

BOARDS OK MISSIONS. 

The Doctor places no very high estimato upon the useful- 
ness of the labors of volunteer associations, and " Boards," 
organized to do missionary work. On this point he says : 

" The way by which the Church has grown show* how little 
men appreciate the seed and office by which God provided for 
its growth. Long time it was by that emigration which 
brought a few devout ones together in a village or hajnlet, 
who, when they found each other out, consulted how they 
might secure Christian ministratioD. To aid these small be- 
ginnings, societies were formed, most unfortunately miscalled 
missionary. Bishops are God's missionary society. The low 
churchmen of New Y >rk, by a truer instinct, rightly named 
theirs a pastoral aid society. Bat real mission work was chiefly 
done by zealous priests, who seeing the destitution of outly- 
ing districts, with more or less of cost to their own proper 
pastoral work, went out to a work no ways theirs. These grew 
to what we misname mission stations, by a society's ekeing 
out, ofttimcs for years, the scanty pittance on which a minis- 
ter must live till he can do better. The evil of the system 
was that centres of influence were not choson, nor places 
which gave promise of a large and speedy success. 'The only 
element of selection was the accident of a piojs emigration, 
or convenience of access from an established parish — a Dar- 
winian method of natural selection, not of intelligent choice. 
That the Church has grown so much with such neglectful ad- 
ministration is one of the strongest proofs of her divine life. 
Nothing human could survive such neglec^to adapt means to 
ends. 

This neglect of method, and the slow growth of the Church, 
have developed a restive, inquiring, dissatisfied spirit in the 
Church, tending 10 experiments to remedy it. The last trien- 
nial meeting of the ' Board of Missions' proposed and car- 
ried the plan of public nieetiugs to stimulate enthusiasm. 
What will come of it we cannot say. But till some other 
method comes mere enthusiasm will do little- good. The same 
restiveness and need of method has developed in the older 
sees a new agency — that of convocations. This is better 
simply in that it tends to some system where we have none. 
But we dislike it thoroughly. It puts a human invention and 
device in the place of God's appointed agency. A diocese is 
the unit of the Church. The Bishop is lie through whom a 
diocese and all its members are in communion with the body 
of Christ — the Church. The work of a diocese is a common 
work in which all are equally interested. The Bishop is the 
missionary and chief pastor in his see. His clergy are his as- 
sistants. Their interest is in his work, and through him. 
Convocations (admirable as they are when held for divine ser- 
vice, mutual intercourse, the warming of the hearts of breth- 
ren for each other by fraternal companionship, and the attri- 
tion of mind with mind), when they enter on the work of 
missions, create local centres of interest and administration. 
It grows of and tends to individualism and independency of 
which we have far too much already. We little understand 
the idea of relation to the Church, and her work only through 
the Bishop as it is stated in the Ignatiau Epistles, and in the 
Epistles of St. Cyprian, or any of the early Fathers." 

MR. webb's st. twei.'.mo. 

The Eastern critical journals, including the Nation, the 
Round Table and the New York Week/'/ Review, epeak very 
favorably of Mr. Webb's last performance. The Weekly Re- 
view very justly says : 

" Absurd novels are more effectually criticised by satire or 
burlesque than by serious discussion. To review Miss Evans' 
' St. Elmo,' as a work entitled to the least consideration from 
any person of sense, taste, and culture, would be a waate of 
time and labor. It is merely a piece of trash, that only de- 
serves to be laughed at. Mr. C. H. Webb, who is both author 
and publisher of the travestie, ' St. Twel'mo,' — to which we 
invite the attention of our readers — has very cleverly turned 
a bad novel into ridicule. Comical as his work is, however, 
it is not, to our mind, a wit more comical than the original 
which it burlesques. Thousands of copies of ' St. Elmo,' 
are said to have been sold ; and, if that piece of absurdity is 
popular, why shall not the burlesque be popular also ? Our 
earnest wish is. at any rate, that ' St. Twel'mo' may follow 
wherever ' St. Elmo' has gone. The one will be a correc- 
tive of the other." 

It may be added, that "St Twel'mo" is not a mere travestie. 
A serious critical purpose is perceptible to the intelligent 
reader, showing that the author aimed at exposing in the most 
effectual, though not the most direct manner, the shallowness 
and superficiality of 6uch books as St Elmo. 

Here is Mr. Webb's description of his hero, " the cunei- 
form cyclopedist of Chattacooga :" 



"A thrill shot along her nerves ; she felt a blind fumbling 
at her heart-strings ; a presentiment overwhelmed her ; the 
Pantheistic Necessity that ehe should marry the rude intruder 
became evident aud apparent— in him she recognized the 
coming man. 

The coming man — that is, the one who had just gone out — 
was tall and athletic, not exactly young and not percisely el- 
derly ; it would be safe to set him down as middle-aged. Ac- 
cording to all accounts, he must havo l^een a rather rum-look- 
ing customer ; for his fair chiseled lineameuts were blotted by 
dissipation and blackened and distorted by the baleful fires of 
a fierce, passionate nature, and a restless, poweful, and unhal- 
lowed intellect. Furthermore, he was symmetrical and grand 
As some temple of Juno, 
Whose polished shafts 
Gleamed centuries ago. 

In the morning sunshine 
Of a day of wo, 

(this thing resolves itself iiito rhyme), whose untimely night 
has endured for nineteen hundred years ; so in the glorious 
Hush of his youth this man had stood facing a noble and pos- 
sibly sanctified future, (and things) ; but the ungovernable 
flames of sin had reduced him, like that blackened and dese- 
crated fane, to a melancholy mass of ashy arches and black- 
ened columns, where ministering priests, all holy aspirations, 
slumbered in the dust. 

The dress of this melancholy mass of ashy arches and 
blackened columns was costly but negligent, and the red stain 
on his jacket told that his errand had not been fruitless, (from 
which it might be inferred that he had been stiawberrying as 
well as ducking). As part of this costly but negligent dress, 
this melancholy mass wore a straw hat and belted with broad 
black ribbons, and his spurred boots (hunters down there ab 
ways put spurs on when they chase the wild duck and the 
fierce snipe to their Lookout Mountain fastness) were damp 
and muddy.'' 

The following bit of dialogue between St. Twel'mo, and 
./Etna, the encyclopedic heroine, is capital, and cannot fail to 
remiud those who have read anything of " the great Southern 
novelist," bf the sprightly and erudite conversational stylo 
that is common to all her chief characters : St. Elmo speaks : 

'• ' Pardon me if f remiud you,' he said, ' of the preliminary 
and courteous en garde ! which should be pronounced before 
a thrust. De Guerin felt starved in Languedoc, and no won- 
der ! But had he penetrated every nook and cranny of the 
habitable globe aud traversed the Saharas which scionce 
accords the universe, he would have died at last as hungry as 
Ugolino. I speak advisedly, for the true lo gadfly eunut has 
stung me from hemisphere to hemisphere, across tempestuous 
oceans, scorching deserts, and icy mountain ranges. I have 
faced alike the bjurrans of the steppes and the Samieli of 
Shauio, and the result of my vandal life is best epitomized in 
those grand but grim words of Bossuet : •' On trouve uu fond 
de lout le dide el le neanl." Nineteen years ago, to satisfy my 
hunger, I set out to hunt the daiuliest food this world would 
furnish, and, like other fools, have learned finally, that life is 
but a huge mellow golden Osher, (short for pumpkin,) that 
mockingly silts its bitter dust upon our eager lips. Ah I 
truly, On trouve au fond de tout le ride el le neanl /." 

'• Etna promptly made answer to thi* sprightly little sally : 
' Mr. Murray, if you insist upon your bitter Osher simile, why 
shut your eyes to the palpable analogy suggested ? Natural- 
ists assert that the Solatium, or apple of Sodom, contains in 
its normal state neither dust nor ashes, unless it is punctured 
by an insect, (the Tenthredo,) which converts the whole of 
the inside into dust, leaving nothing but the rind entire, with- 
out any loss of color. Human life is as fair and tempting as 
the fruit of Aiu Judy, still stung aud poisoned by the Tenth- 
redo of sin.' " 

LOWKl.L AND LONGFELLOW. 

A writer in the New York Independent, who has been on 
a literary pilgrimage to the home3 of divers down east celebri. 
ties, gives the following sketch of the auther of the " Biglow 
papers :" 

" Lowell is very striking in his personal appearance— strik- 
ingly handsome he is usually called — though handsome is not 
precisely the word to use. He looks like one of Ruben's 
portraits. His head is finely developed in the intellectual and 
moral organs. His color is prevailingly brown. His strong, 
reddish-brown hair, parted from the middle of his low but 
wide forehead, falls in thick curls, down to his shoulders. His 
beard is of the same color. The expression of his face is not 
sweet, but earnest and grave rather, except when it is lighted 
by mirth or inspiration. Lowell is forty-eight years old ; but 
he looks younger. His form is lithe and compact ; his man- 
ners quiet ; an air of self-composure is always about him. He 
io remarkably genial with his friends, fond of jest and tale ; 
but with strangers he is reserved. Only those see Lowell to 
advantage who see him intimately — aud they see one of the 
most delightful men in the world.' 1 

Of Longfellow and his surioundings, the writer thus speaks : 
"The spacious rooms arc furnished with ostentatious luxury ; 
elegant literature is freely strewn about : pictures, eugrvings, 
and miscellaneous works of art adorn the walls and gracs the 
mantels. The library, on the secoud floor front, expresses the 
occupant. It is a large, sunny room, fitted with books of all 
languages, that seem to have fallen into their places at tbo 
bidding of the muse Here sits the poet. Mr. Lougfellow 
was always a poet to look at — in form, features, and expression 
a poet. Lawrence's portrait, engraved for the small blue and 
gold edition of the poetical works, gives an admirable idea of 
his head and countenance in its finest mood — though not iu its 
domestic aspect. Since the fearful death of his wife, the out- 
ward man of the poet has altered -much. The step is less 
buoyant than it was. The bearing less joyous, the look less 
elate. The florid man has matured into an exceediug mellow- 



The California!!. 



5 



ne33 of dignity. Kipe and rich-looking he always was— ex- 
quisitely neat in dress and exquisitely elegant in person — 
though always animated by a sentiment that saved him from 
the suspicion ot foppery. But now he has attained a won- 
derful completeness of expression. His aspect is that of a 
bard in the full affluence of his years, and the full wealth of 
his genius. His silvered hair is long and wavy. His beard 
grows white and thick beneath his chin, looking- like a deep 
lake ruff than anything else. His voice is melodious as an 
organ ; and his features, handsome as ever, have been touched 
with new lines, by tho actiou of thought and sorrow. His 
manners are very beautiful to all persons ; and he carries 
about him that indescribable atmosphere that marks the per- 
fectly cultured gentleman." 

SWINBURNE APPRECIATED. 

A powerful champion has come to the rescue of the erratic 
Swinburne, and furnishes in the pages of the Weslmister 
Review, the ablest, the keenest, and the most impartial es- 
timate of that original and daring genius that has yet been 
published. The reviewer attributes the violent antagonism of 
a certain class of critics to Swinourne's poetry, to an unduly 
exclusive admiration of the meditative and contemplative 
school of Coleridge and Wordsworth. He says : 

" It cannot be questioned that Mr. Swinburne's poetry is 
mainly the outcome and hitherto the highest manifestation of 
a strong, silent, but very sensible reaction against the prin- 
ciples and practice of the Wordsworthian school of poetry. 
For the past quarter of a century that school has domineered 
over English verse writers ; the very greatest of our living 
poets have not escaped its spell ; and the native vigor of 
their individualities alone has saved them in all important 
points harmless. We do not intend any disparagement of 
Wordsworth's own genius, which was of its kind unsurpassed. 
But it may be acknowledged by hi3 warmest advocates that 
his influence on English poe.try has not been wholly benefi- 
cient. It is certain that the lever-fit of admiration for the 
poet of " The Excursion," which England was seized with 
after thirty or forty years of neglect, has fostered every one 
of the special vices of our contemporary works of imagina- 
tion. Corruptio oplhii fit pessima. The qualities which 
made Wordsworth a great poet, have set all the p'uny choir of 
fledgeling bards singing of mountains and molehills, if not of 
metaphysics. Tho apparent (not real) lack of finish in some 
of Wordsworth's minor poems has given our younger mins- 
trels a pretext for rudeness and carelessness in their work ; 
and from the same example they have derived the theory that 
not heroic lives or heroic actions are the proper material in 
which poetry should work, but rather buttercups and babies. 

" Mr. Swinburne's poetry, then, being a protest against the 
narrow and prudish ideas of the day, has gone, as we have 
seen, to the opposite extreme, and has boldly given the lie to 
most accepted conventions. But it is remarkable that a pro- 
test so fierce as this has issued in part from another artistic 
development of Wordsworth's theories ; we mean pre-Ra- 
phaelite art. The " Poems aud Ballads" are dedicated to Mr. 
Burues Jones, and two very admirable poems have been sug- 
gested by pictures of Mr. Whistler and Mr. Dante Q. Rossetti." 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Mr. Louis Gaylord Clarke is writing a series of humorous 
sketches for the Philadelphia Home Weekly, under the gen- 
eral title "Things Remembered." Clarke exhibits still some 
of the old fire with which he was wont to shine in the Knick- 
erbocker Magazine. In a recent communication he tells this 
story of Mr. Theodore Tiltoo, of the Independent, aud a land- 
lord at whose table he " boarded." His host, who was con- 
tinually " short" of money, was in the habit of handing in 
his bills before they were due, and making apologies for it. 
Ou one occasion, when a bill was laid upon Tilton's table, 
with the customary apologetic note, he enclosed the money in 
an envelope, with the following reply : 

" You need make uo excuse, my dear landlord, 
I'll pay your bills ar, soon as they are scored ? 
For if from me you may, 
, Before the proper day, 
Get pay for board ; 
Yet also I from you, 
Long, long before 'tis due, 
Get bored for pay." 

Walt Whitman is said to be devoting his leisure to the 
preparation of a new edition of his poems. The Times thinks 
" if he could so far yield to what he regards as the prejudices 
of the public as to omit a few of the poems included in former 
editions, he would readily not only achieve a wide popularity 
but make known some of the finest aud noblest strains in the 
English tongue to persons who probably will otherwise never 
see them. One thing is certain," says the same critic, " our 
late war has produced no other verse at all comparable to the 
poems he has written upon it." 

Serpents in Doves' Nests. — Under this rather fanciful 
title, the Rev. John Todd, I). D., of Norwich Connecticut, 
has published a pamphlet addressed particularly to married 
women, urging upon their attention the important duties of 
maternity, and protesting against what he denominates 
" Fashionable Murder." Dr. Todd's statements — which, how- 
ever, we do not care to rehearse — are very startling and terri- 
ble. We can but hope that this little book will find its way 
to the public for whom it is intended, aud be instrumental in 
arresting the progress of tho frightful evil which is alleged to 
exist in our midst. 

Mr. Dickens announces yet another collected edition of his 
writings. It is to be called " The Charles Dickens Edition," 
and each volume will be accompanied by a facsimile of the 



author's signature. Mr. Dickens, it is expected, will soon re- 
visit the United Ststes, aud give a series of readings from his 
own works, in the chief cities. He has, by the way, written 
to Messrs. Ticknor & Fields a letter expressive of his emphatic 
approval of the illustrations to the Diamond Edition, furn- 
ished by Mr. Sol Eytinge, Jr. 

The last number of the Quarlerlg Review contains a curi- 
ous article on " The Poetry of the Seven Dials." It discussed 
the most important and popular of the halfpenny ballads 
which have been published in Loudon, from the year 1854 
down to the effusion suggested by the lions in Trafalgar 
square. In respect to " dying speeches" it tells us : " Many 
of these are clearly by the same haud, probably one of the 
five or six well-kuowii authors, who also chant their own 
verses in the streets. ' I gets,' says one of the fraternity, ' I 
gets a shilling a copy for the verses written by the wretched 
culprit the night previous to his execution.' 'And I,' says 
another, ' did the helegy on Rush. I didn't write it to 
horder ; I knew that they would want a copy of verses from 
the wretched culprit. And when the publisher (Mr. Catnach) 
read it, " that's the thing for the streets," he says. But I 
only got a shilling for it.' ' It's the same poet as loes 'em 
all,' says a third authority, 'aud the same tip ; no more nor a 
bob fur nothing.' " 

Tennyson's friend, the Rev. F. D. Maurice, has put forth a 
book on "The Commandments considered as Instruments of 
National Reformation." 

'A book was recently announced in London, with this sin- 
gular title : " The Spirit Disembodied. When we die we do 
not fall asleep : we only change our place." By Herbert 
Broughton. 

M. C. llippeau has just published the first part of his Col- 
lection of French Poems of the Twelfth aud Thirteen Cen- 
turies. 

Laughton Osborne, the poet and critic, has translated from 
Apuleius the pretty love story of Cupid and Psyche. It is 
freed from indelicacy and is entitled " The Birth of Pleasure." 



The literal translation of the remark is : placing your nose 
opposite to the sun, and, opening your mouth, you will show 
the hour to all observers. A Greek poet describes the nose 
of a man as being so large that its distance prevented him 
from hearing himself sneeze. 

Although the nose has been ridiculed through all the time, 
and held in contempt, yet the majority of the greatest men 
who have ever lived have been noted for large noses. The 
Romans had a proverb : " It is not common to every one 
to have a nose ;" meaning that it was not every one who 
could boast of a prominent nasal appendage, or, to speak 
more plainly, have an expressive nose. Cyrus the Great had 
a long, sharp nose ; and the Persians of the present day, in 
order that they may resemble-., in one particular, at least, their 
great warrior, pinch their noses to resemble his. Cicero was 
called the orator with the equivocal nose. Julius C'ssar had 
an aquiline nose ; so had Achilles ; but the nose of the old 
philosopher, Socrates, it is said to relate, wa3 a decided pug. 

It is almost needless to say that the nose enters very largely 
into the matter of personal beauty. All writers on physiology 
and beauty lay great stress on the part it must take in tho 
facial outline. Some call it the regular of all the features. 
One claims it should be one third the length from the tip of 
the chin to the roots of the hair ; and, if there is any devia- 
tion from this rule, it must be an excess, for it would be bet- 
ter to have too large a nose than one too small. Plato called 
the aquiline the royal nose ; and from the fact that the sub- 
jects of most of the early sculptors and painters were repre- 
sented as having large noses, we may judge that they pre- 
ferred them to small ones. But tastes differ ; for, among the 
Kalmucks, a dumpy nose is considered the perfection of 
beauty. The Hottentots, among other heathenish customs, 
flatten the noses of their offspring ; and the Chinese consider 
a nose of no account unless it be short and thick. The Criru 
Tartars do worse than this — they break the nose of their 
children because they consider them in the way of their eyes. 



THE NOSE. 

is rather a singular fact that, although the eyes, tho 
mouth, the eyebrows, the eyelashes, the lips— in fact, all 
the other features of tlie face, have received commendation 
from the poets, the nose has been alone, without much pass- 
ing remark. Throughout all political literature, there seems 
to have been a strict silence kept on this important subject 
No poet has ever yet found courage to write an " ode" to the 
nose. One would think it would be a very good subject, if 
for nothing else than fur its novelty. It certainly is not worn 
out, because there has been very little, if anything written 
about it. 

Even in conversation, in every-day life, very light mention 
is made of the no3e. How often we hear the expression : 
" What beautiful eyes ;" " what rosy lips ;" " what plump 
cheeks ;" but how seldom is the remark made, " what a fine 
nose!" Whenever the nose is spoken of, it is with a smile. 
No one ever talks seriously about it; few ever think of ex- 
patiating on its beauty. It is more than probable if our 
greatest poet should send a poem " on the nose" to the editor 
of a periodical, the latter would respectfully decline it, with 
the remark : " That's all very good, my dear sir, but then you 
know, it is pn the nose, and that won't do at all." 

The very terms we use in describing a man's nose tend to 
bring it into contempt and make us laugh. For instance, we 
say that a mau has a pug nose, a parrot's nose, or a turned-up 
nose. Some thoughtless people designate it as a snout, a 
proboscis ; while others, in speaking of a large nose, call it a 
promontory. A Frenchman says of a clever man, that he 
has a fine nose ; of a proud man, that he carries his nose in 
the air ; an inquisitive person is said to poke his nose every- 
where ; a gourmand is described as always having his nose 
in his plate ; that of the scholar is said to be always in his 
books. When an individual is growing angry under provoca- 
tion, the French say the mustard is rising to hLs nose. The 
English say of a man who does not form very decisive opin- 
ions—who is led by what others say rather than by hia own 
judgment— that he is led by the nose. Others, who do them- 
selves harm when trying to injure an enemy, are said to have 
cutoff the nose to spite the face. And, in love affairs, when 
a rival has been supplauted, it is said that ho has had his 
nose put out of joint. 

A whole issue of our journal might be filled with the 
humorous allusions which have been made on the nose. From 
the very earliest time down to the present, it would seem as 
if there were a tacit agreement among mankind to make the 
nose a subject of jest. The following is a versification of a 
remark made on a man who not only had a very large nose, 
but large teeth also : 

" Let Dick one summer's day expose 
Before the sun his monstrous nose. 
And stretch his giant mouth, to cause 
Its eb»de to fall upon his jaws ; 
His nose so long and mouth so wide, 
Aud those twelve grinders, side by side, 
Then Dick, -with very little trial, 
Would make an excellent sun-dial," 



California Wine.— Among tho most extensive wine cellars if not 
the largest in our city, is that of G. Groezinger, N. W. corner Battery 
and Pine streets, running nearly ' the entire block. Wines from all 
parts of the State are to he fonnd in abundance in this vault. Mr. 
Groezinger has agencies in New York, Chicago and other Western 
cities, which draw heavily on his stock here. Still he supplies our 
city and the Pacilic coast with his different wines put up in cases or 
hulk, if so ordered. For private families, by the case or demijohn, 
he has a superior article of red wine for table use, like unto the Tiuta 
Madeira a choice wine URod in Kurope ; besides, fine old Port and 
white wine. Mr. Groezinger assures its that brandy, equal to the 
finest imported can be made hero from the mountain grape. Success 
attend the undertaking. 

Sawing and Planing Mills. — The most extensive Sawing and 
Planing Mills on the Pacilic coast are those of the firm of D. A. 
Macdonald & Co., corner Market and Beale streets. There are four 
members comprising this firm, all practical men, namely, D. A. aud J. 
H. Macdonald J. McGill and II. Cliioman. Their eniulovees number 
two hundred and upwards, and at the close of the day's work when 
the men leave the buildings for their homes, it reminds us ot one of 
our Eeastein steamers discharging her passengers. A large capital is 
necessary to carry on so extensive au establishment, but the demand 
for material for building purposes justifies such a Jarge outlay of 
money and employ of hands. Adjoining of the main building is the 
sample rooms, where tlie different kinds of timber are assorted 
ready lor sale to our City contractors and builders, as well as for the 
interior trade. 



Merchant Tailors.— ZeitsKa &. Sbeppard have opened at No. 610 
Clay street, a few doors north of Montgomery, where the latter 
gentleman was established in the same business in 1853. Both of 
these gentlemen are old forty niner's, aud experienced cutters. They 
make to order gentlemen's wearing apparel of the latest Loudon, 
Paris or Ne<v York styles. If you wish to be sure of perfect fitting 
suits of any description of goods call and leave your orders with 
them. 

Italian Restaurant. — This restaurant was open to the public last 
week bj Messrs Coco & Tovolara, who are well known to their coun- 
trymen as caterers in different restaurants*in San Francisco for years. 
Wine is given both for breakfast and dinner, making an entire break- 
fast or dinner, composed of Italian dishes, for the moderate sum of 
50 cents. The location of the Italian Restaurant is 540 Commercial 
stree, one door below Montgomery, east side. A most convenient 
locality 'o our principal thoroughfare. 

New Printing Firm. — Mr. Win. M. Glittery (rec ently of Sterett & 
Cubery) has, in connection with Mr. F. W. Van Reynegom, estab- 
lished a Book and Job Printing House at 5I!0 Market street, directly 
opposite Second street, under the linn name of Cubery &, Co. Resi 
dents in that section of the city wishing to call in the aid of the 
" Printer's Art " can rely upon procuring good work at the lowest 
rates, by leaving their orders with Cuhery & Co. 

Meagher, Taaite & Co., have made a further reduction iu certain 
articles of Dry Goods. See their advertisement. 

Sash Dodrs etc. — Win. O. Breyfogle has increased his facilties 
for turnin pout, Sash, Doors, Blinds and Shutters. Contra, 'tors and 
Builders, both in the City ami Country, will find it to their interest t 
leave their orders at his establishment No. Z6 California street— Coun- 
try orders attended to and delivered punctual}'. 

Poison Oak. — The effects of this pcstifoi ioijs s'ui itb are now most 
virulent. Dr. Bourne's method is the only reliable cure. No. 10 
Masonic Temple, Post street. , „ 

Cures Guaranteed to the sick in almost all cases (without medi.' 
cine, mesmerism, jugglery, or,uny species of fraud or deception) by 
Dr. Bourne No. 10 Masonic Temple. * 



Young Men requiring the aid of a physician can receive important 
information gratuitously, by applying to Dr. Bourne, No. 10 Mssonio, 
Temple, * 



6 



The Calitornian. 



MY DREAM. 

T AST night I dreamed of you— 
Ah ! sweets if you only knew, 
What Boom would arise in lliose beautiful eyes, 
Those wonderful eyes of blue! 

I dreamed that I held you closer 

So close to this bosom, sweet, 
That your billowy hair strayed over my breast. 

And I felt your heart beat. 
Your cheeks were so temptingly near, 

And your lips were so temptingly red, 
That I kissed them, over and over again,— 

You hung your beautiful head, 

And blushed like the veriest child. 

Fair Koae— rare Rose of the North i 
On your cheeks where the snow drops and lilies grow, 

Carnations and roses sprang forth. 

Whut was it I read in your eyes I 

'Twas the old, old story, sweet : 
You loved me— I poured out my passionate soul 

At your beautiful, beauiful feet. 

Then come, my Beautiful, come 

To this loyal heart o' mine ! 
O come, my Lily, my wee with Rose, 

With those 'wildering eyes o' thine ! 

O come as came last night— 

(I remember your eyes' soft gleam,) 
Come, Heart o' my heart and love me now, 

As you loved me in mv dream ! 

A. N. 



UNDER GREEK FIRE. 

NEAR the foot of Mount Pentelicus, and a few miles dis- 
tant from Athens, a tranquil little village lies in the 
heart of a thickly-wooded hollow ; it is surrounded by olive 
trees of great age, and every flat-roofed cottage has its tiny 
vineyard attached to it, or at least its garden, containing a 
poinegranite or fig tree, as the sole revenue of its possessor. 
In winter the Cephisus runs through it with that delicious 
sound of flowing water which is so refreshing in an arid cli- 
-nate, end in summer its dry bed, filled with sparkling pieces 
i white marble, is almost hid by the lovely rose laurels which 
t luster over it. In the centre of the village stands the little 
church, with its Byzantine architecture, its ever-burning lamp, 
and its open door, through which at dawu, and again at sun- 
set, soft clouds of incense are seen to roll, while the monoton- 
ous voice of the priest is heard chanting the old words that 
have echoed down to him through more than a thousand cen- 
turies. Near it is the fountaiu, where the peasant women 
come in their gracefnl Albanian dress with brown capote and 
long white veil, to fill the earthen jars they bear on their 
shoulders, and which, in shape, are precisely the same as those 
depicted on the vaces found in ancient tombs. Immediately 
behind the villiage is the great myrtle-clad mountain, whose 
marble quarries have yielded up the treasures which to this 
day give life to the classic memories of Greece — and on the 
other side, it needs but to ascend a little rising ground to 
catch sight of these gleaming pillars of the Parthenon, which 
■eems, when spiritualized by the effects of strong sunlight, 
like the pure white vision of some heavenly temple in the air. 

This village is inhabited entirely by peasants ; and what it 
was at the time when the events took place which we are 
about to record, it still is— the perfect type of an Attic village. 
Quietly and monotonously the simple life of its inhabitants has 
gone on since then ; undisturbed by the storms and convul- 
sions of tho world without, which to them have been only like 
the faint sound of waves falling on an unseen shore ; but they 
have especially remained unchanged in this respect, that to 
gratify their hatred of the Moslem they are prepared to do and 
to suffer now all that they did and suffered then. 

In one of the best houses of the village, which, nevertheless, 
only consisted of one large room with an earlhem floor, there 
lived an old man named Apostoli, with his son Uonstandi and 
his daughter Xautha. He was looked upon as a considerable 
proprietor, for he possessed two olive trees of bis own and 
some beehives ; and when he went, as all other men did, to 
Binuke his pipe in front of the little cafe in the evening, a 
place was always reserved for him beside the pappa3 as the 
post of honcr, although the good priest himself differed in no 
respect from the other villagers, excepting that he new the 
Liturgy of St. Basis by heart. Apostoli and his son had both 
taken arms against the Turks, and they p03sesed one gun be- 
tween them, which had done good execution in the time of 
need. Xautha was fifteen, and beautiful as a Greek maiden 
of that age often is, with her long almond shaped eyes, clear 
olive complexion, and splendid coils of dark hair, which, 
when left to hang loose, touched the ground at her feet. She 
wore it twisted round her little red fez, with three gold coins 
hanging from it over her forehead, which constituted all the 
money that Apostoli and his fathers before him had ever 
possessed. The soft white veil with which she had been 
taught to cover the lower part of her face, leaving only the 
eyes visible, when she met any man, usually fell in graceful 
folds on her shoulders ; her j;ray pelisse, of a thick woolen 



material embroidered with red, reached to her knees, and be- 
low this she wore a long white garment with wide hanging 
sleeves, which was conlined at the waist by a silken scarf ; 
red slippers covered her small brown feet : and thus attired in 
the identical dress which her dead mother and grandmother 
had worn before her, little Xantha looked as classical a figure 
as could well have been seen. It was a calm, hot summer eve- 
ning, and, like all other women in the village, Xautha was 
seated on the ground, outside her own door, talking to the 
inhabitant of the next house, who was in a similar position. 
The coutrast presented by these two neighbors was very singu- 
lar, although their dress was precisely the same. Xautha was 
at the ripest hour of her young beauty, and Diamanta was 
not only the oldest woman in the village, but probably the old- 
est in Greece, for she had numbered a hundred and twelve 
years7and looked the mo3t withered wrinkled old mummy it 
13 possible to imagine. It almost seemed as if she had been 
dried up to such a state of complete preservation that she 
must last forever ; and there was no sign of life about her 
when her face was in repose, except the dim black e}e3 which 
looked out upon the world with an uncertain gaze, as though 
it were strange to them. She was speaking now, however, 
and the shrill, muffled voice seemed to come from a distance. 

" Yes, conzi mou," (my daughter), she was saying, "it is 
as I tell you — the saints have forgotten me — I am tired of 
living, and they ought to have taken me years ago ; but they 
have never troubled their heads about me, and it is very un- 
kind of them, especially of Saint Dimitri ; for it is I that 
have given him a taper on his feast-day every year, and let it 
burn down to the end, because he was my husband's name 
saint. He ought to remember me at least ; but he don't— he 
cau take Petrachi, the barber, who was only eighty, and Sta- 
mina, the papas' widow, who was not so much ; but he can't 
think of me, oh, no !" 

"Tell about your husband, uiitera mou," (my mother,) said 
Xantha, interrupting the old woman's grumbling. " What 
was he like ?" 

" How should I remember? He has been dead a huudred 
years. I married him when I was eleven, and he died the 
year after." 

" Dead a hundred years ago!" exclaimed Xantha, letting 
her distaff fall from her hand, "and you a widow all that 
time! But you can tell me if you liked him, surely; and if 
you were sorry when he died ?" 

" Not I, indeed ! I know nothing about it. I married him 
because my father said I must do so, without my ever having 
seen bim before the wedding day, as you will marry your 
bridegroom, poulaki mou, (my little bird,) when the time 
comes." 

" But, mitera mou," said Xantha, still pursuing her re- 
searches into the history of the poor old worn-out heart that 
was beating so feebly now with the last remnant of life, " if 
you lived a whole year with your husband, you must remem- 
ber if you grew to love him, and if it seemed to you wheu he 
died as if the sun had gone out, as 1 am sure it would to 
me ?" 

" I tell you, poulaki, I remember nothing about him. I 
knew I got the public mourners to come and shriek when he 
died, for 1 always done my duty, I did. But I don't care any- 
thing about it — I want to die, if only Saint Dimitri would act 
like a Christian, and take me ?" « 

" Well, mitera mou, you are very old, I know," said Xantha 
with a sigh, " but I do not think if I lived even as long as 
you have done, I should wish to die. I should not like to 
have my best clothe3 put on me, and to be carried away to be 
hid under ground. I want to live ; I do not want ever to die. 
Oh, life is sweet 1" 

"Ah, well," grumbled Diatnanti, "you will not find it so 
pleasant when you have no teeth to eat even olives with, and 
when you cannot see whether it is a grape or a blue beetle 
you are putting in your mouth, as it happened to me yester- 
day." Just at this moment Apostoli came slowly up, pipe 
iu hand, and told Xantha to come into the house, as he had 
something to say to her. 

She obeyed, and the old man seated himself cross-legged 
on the divan, where a little square carpet formed his bed at 
night, while his daughter sat down on the ground at his feet. 
Apostoli smoked in silence for a few minutes with great so- 
lemnity, and theu said : 

" My daughter, you are now fifteen, are you not ?" 

" Yes, father ; I began my sixteenth year on the feast of 
the sleep of the Virgin." 

" It is a great age," said the old man, gravely ; " you 
should have gone home to a husband last year, but 1 have 
been so occupied with these accursed Turks that I have neg- 
lected my duty to you ; however, it is all settled now. I have 
found you a bridegroom, and you will be married next week." 

Xantha started violently, while the sudden color dyed ber 
face with as rich a glow as that which blushes over Hymet- 
tus when is sinking. 

" 0, my father, do I" she exclaimed. " I do not wish to 
marry." 



Apostoli took his pipe out of his mouth, aud starod at her 
in utter amazement. 

" Xantha, have you slept under the moon and gone mad, 
that you speak such words ? You ought to hide your face 
for shame that you are not married already ; but there will be 
no more delay now ; your godfather and godmother are pre- 
paring your crown, and the papas has premised to have the 
wedding next Sunday." 

" But who is the bridegroom, father ?" asked Xantha, clasp- 
ing her hands with a movement of pain. 

'• Xantha, is that a proper question for you to ask?" said 
Apostoli, severely. " What bad spirit is come to you to- 
day ?" 

The young girl bent down her head in silence, tears drop- 
ping from her eyes. 

" You can ask me, if you like, what I intend to give you 
for your portion, and you will see you have a good father. I 
have promised that you are to have three beehives and your 
mother's clothes. The bridegroom's lather is to give two olive 
trees and the house furnished. Ah ! it is a good bargain" — 
and he stroked his head in a self-satisfied manner. 

" Do I know the bridegroom's father ?" asked Xantha, with 
apparent uuconceru. 

"No; you have, never seen him; he is the demark of 
Keffesia," said the old man, falling into the trap, "and Mane- 
luki is In.- ouly son ; so he is willing to do great things for him. 
Row, my little bird, I have told you thus early of your wed- 
ding in order that you may have tune to get the sweetmeats 
ready, and the gold threads to mix with your hair; and it may 
be as well to have your eyebrows and eyelids painted to-mor- 
row ; but your godmother will see to all that — she is coming 
as soon us the sun rises." 

While he spoke Costandi came through the garden and 
into the house with the peculiarly haughty, almost insolent 
bearing which the Greek peasant is so apt to assume. He 
had the delicate profile und fhort upper lip of his race, aud 
was a fine-looking youth, full of energy and vigor — strangely 
different, indeed, to what he was later in lite, when he was 
known to the writer as a worn, moody, restless man who wan- 
dered about in the deadly sunshine when everyone else was 
sleeping, as if haunted by fatal memories that would not die. 

" I have told Xanthoula," said Apostoli, addressing him, 
" that the bridegroom you know of is coining for her on 
Sunday," 

" Ah, it is time, indeed," said Costandi. " I am ashamed 
to see her still in her father's bouse. There is not a maiden 
in the village so old as she is, and unmarried. You should 
have seen to it earlier, patera mou." 

" Is it my fault ? Could I bring bridegrooms down Irom 
heaven when they had all gone off to fight with these dogs of 
Turks ? But we shall soon see her taken home now. Xan- 
tha, are you dreaming that you do not fill your brother's 
chibouki ? Do not you see that he is waiting for it ?" 

Xantha had been sitting with her eyes bidden in her hands , 
she now rose with a heavy, sullen look on her beautiful, face, 
and, dragging her feet slowly along, went to fill Costandi '■ 
pipe. 

Soon the family prepared to go to rest for the night, and 
as it was extremely hot Apostoli and his sou took tbeir car- 
pets from the divan which formed their couch in colder 
weather, and went out to sleep in the garden. Xantha had 
already lain down jn u mat near the door, and appeared to 
be sunk in a profound slumber. There was, in reality, how- 
ever, noyeleep under those long eyelashes wet with tears ; and 
the wild beating of her heart might almost have been heard 
in the intense stillness that soon fell on all around. For an 
hour or two the Greek gin lay perfectly still ; then cautiously 
she sat up and listened, with her large dark eyes glancing 
from side to side like those of a young fawn when it fears an 
enemy. There was not a sound, however, except the little 
green frogs chirping in the trees, and the perpetual creukiug 
uoise of the cigala. At lost she rose — laid aside her slippers 
— gathered her veil over her face, and stole out of the house. 
She passed her father and brother, who lay buried in deep 
sleep, with the utmost caution, and then with a swift and 
noiseless step, her naked feet scaracely touching the ground, 
she fled away through the village, and out into the olive grove 
beyond, never stopping till she reached a spot iu the center of 
the wood, marked by the tracos of some very ancient ruins. 
Here she paused. Her feet, though she knew it not, were on 
the site of a temple once dedicated to Pallas, while, at a little 
distance from her, were the remains of a chapel which bore 
the evidences of four different epochs unmistakably on its 
crumbling walls. 

But there was only one good in heaven or in earth for 
Xantha in that hour, and she was waiting for it now with long- 
ing eyes and parted lips, and hands clasped tight to still the 
throbbing of her heart. Soon the sound which was the music 
of life to her came faintly on the air. She heard the gallop- 
ing of a horse coming ever nearer and nearer towards her. 
Now her eyes g.ew larger with joyful excitement, her chest 
heaved, her breathing became short and hurried — nearer and 
nearer— through the trees she can discern the beautiful Arab 
mare that was bearing to her the desire of her heart, and in 



T h e California?!. 



7 



another moment the horseman was at her side. He flung 
himself to the ground and caught her in his arui3, while she 
let her head fall on his breast with a faint cry of delight. 

But now the terror and the curse of Xantha's fate is seen, 
for the lover whom the Greek maiden has welcomed with such 
rapture is a Turk ! A noble looking man, indeed ; but a 
Turk wearing a green turban, which marked him as a descend- 
ant of Mahomet, and a scimentar which had often been red- 
dened by the blood of Greeks. 

" Oh, Achmet !" she said, as they sat down together at the 
foot of an olive tree, " it is well that we were to meet to- 
night, for you must save me now, or it will be too late for- 
ever." And she shuddered, squeezing her little hands into 
his as if she wanted him to hold her safe from the grasp of 
others. 

" What has happened V he said, drawing her nearer to him. 

" My father is going to bring a bridegroom on Sunday to 
take me away !" 

" A bridegroom !" said Achmet, scoffingly. " I am your 
bridegroom, Xanthoula, and noue other shall you have." 

" I know it, Achmet mou — I would rather die than go with 
another ; but what shall I do when my father brings him to 
marry me ? Oh, don't let him take me away !" 

" Fear nothing, my little bird, he shall never come near you, 
for you must do now what should have been done long ago. 
You must come with me to my strong tower in Negropoint, 
where you will be safe for the present, and then, when I can 
get a ship, I will take you to Stamboul, where you shall live in 
my harem aud do nothing to amuse yourself all day long. 

" Oh, Achmet, if only you were a Greek !" she said, putting 
her arras round his neck. 

" Can you not love me as I am — Xantha, can you not?" he 
answered, holding back her head that he might look into her 
eyes. 

" I do, I do, better than life ; but my father — -ray brother — 
if they were ever to know I had gone away with a Turk !" 
And she shuddered from head to foot. 

" They will never know it, angelaki mou — (my little angel ;) 
you must come with mo now — at ouce. My good Arab will 
have placed you in safety before they have awakened to miss 
you. Come, my thrice bsloved — light of heart — we must not 
delay another instant." 

He rose, and drew Xantha to her feet. She stood for a mo- 
ment trembling aud changing color, her eyes full of tears, her 
lips quivering ; her country, her religion, her father, were 
straining on the chords that bound them to her heart — while 
before her was the face which was the sun of her existence. 

" Choose, Xantha," said Achmet, who was watching her 
keenly : " if you do not come with me now, yo'i will never see 
me again." 

With a cry she fluug herself into his arms. 

" Achmet mou, you must be my home, my country my all!" 

Without a word he lifted her on the horse, took bis seat be- 
hind her, and in another moment they were flying through the 
olive grove as if the beautiful Arab had wings to his feet. 

Xantha was missed as soon as her father and brother awoke, 
for it was a circumstance so unprecedented that a Greek peas- 
ant girl should be absent from her home, that it excited alarm 
and suspicion at once. Costandi went without delay into the 
village to try and obtain some tidings of her, and in the course 
of an hour he came back to his father with his face so trans- 
formed by furious passion that the old man rose appalled from 
his seat, and could only gasp out " My daughter!" 

"Your daughter aud my sister no more, father," said Cos- 
tandi, grinding his teeth. " The accursed woman has given 
herself to Achmet, the Turk— yes, the Turk ! — and has gone 
with hira to his home !" 

The old man gave a cry almost like that of a wild beast 
when his pray is torn from him. 

"It cannot be — it cannot be," he groaned out; "that son 
of a dog may have carried her off, but she has not consented. 

" She has,"' said his son. He came up to Apostoli, and 
spoke in a voice of deep passion. " Listen, father ; the papas 
met them in the olive grove — she was on the horse in front of 
the Turk. The priest thought she was being stolen away, 
aud he caught the bridle, and besought that hound to give her 
up to him ; then Xantha — Xantha, father ! —turned and put 
her arms around the Turk, and said she would never leave 
him — she would go with him wherever he went ; she was his 
own, his wife. 

Apostoli stopped his ears. " Enough," he said. He sat 
down on the divan, his face changing to a livid hue and a 
dark expression of concentrated rage and hate. At last he 
stretched out his right hand and said : "Let her be anathema!" 

"It is not enough only to curse her, father," said Co3tandi 
very Blowly. The old man looked up and met his son's eyes. 
He understood the meaning they expressed, and his ghastly 
face became convulsed in the agony of the terrible conflict of 
feelkig that was rending his heart. Costandi continued to 
meet his imploring gaze unflinchingly. At last the old man, 
in a faint, broken voice, whispered : " My son, must it be ?" 

" Father, are you a Greek, and do you ask me ?" With a 
groan Apostoli drew his capote over bis head, laid his face on 
his arms, and remained motionless. Costandi took his gun 



from the corner of the room and went out. 

It was night once more — sweet, beautiful and calm as that 
which had witnessed Xantha's final apostacy to her country 
and her faith ; aud the solemn loveliness of the hour was even 
more exquisite in the pine-grove of Sooli, where she now 
enjoyed it. than in the familiar scene where she beheld it last 
This grove lies along one side of the plain of Marathon, in 
the shade of the mountains that encircle it, and forms the 
only break in that wide expanse whose edge is washed by the 
rippling waves, with the exception of the tumulus in the centre, 
where the bones of the long-remembered heroes yet rest in 
peace. 

The sea was lying now under the soft starlight like a sheet 
of molten silv«r, serene as the eloudless sky that looked down 
on the calm scene of ancient strife ; and the hush aDd still- 
ness in the air were so complete that one might have well fan- 
cied one could have heard, according to the old tradition, the 
phantom horses of the Persians neigh iu their agony, and the 
shouts of the Greeks as they rushed to their death. Within 
the pine grove the shadows lay soft and deep, but there was 
light enough for little Xantha to busy herself in preparing a 
repast for her lover with the provisions which he had carried 
off from a luckless Greek peasant, whom he had met on the 
mountain-path going home with a well-laden donkey. Ach- 
met had brought Xantha to this spot to rest till the heat of 
the day was over, and they intended to resumo their journey 
in an hour or two. Xantha was moving about with a light 
step and a sunuy smile, arranging the grapes aDd bread and 
the skin of wine at the foot of a tree, whore her lord could 
recline at ease. She had given herself up for the time to the 
intoxicating sweetness of the love she no longer cared to cou- 
ceal ; they were together, free and alone, and she had flung 
out from her heart all thought of Greece in its oppression, and 
her father in his anger and misery. Achmet was with her, 
and what was all the world beside to her? This, she felt, was 
the crowning hour of her life, the best, the sweetest ; and true 
it is that the brightest and loveliest hour of day is often that 
over which the sun c£.sts his last rainbow-tinted rays before he 
leaves the world to gloom and night. 

Presently Xantha discovered that the wooden water-bottle 
which Achmet carried slung from his saddle, was empty, and 
that it must be replenished as much for the sake of the horse 
as for their own. The Turk at once said that he knew there 
was a little mountaiu stream not very far up the hill-side, where 
ho would go to fill it ; and smiling at Xantha's entreaties that 
he would come back as quickly as he could, he swung the bot- 
tle over his shoulder, and disappeared among the trees. Still 
she busied herself in preparations for his comfort, and at last 
having made every arrangement she could think of that was 
likely to please him, she went aud stood quietly leaning against 
a tree, with her beautiful, bright face turned in the direction 
from which she expected to teo her lover return. After a lit- 
tle time her ear detected a footstep, coming toward her ; she 
leaned eagerly forward, calling out in a joyous tone — "Achmet- 
my thrice beloved, are you come ?" — and a voice, a voice she 
knew too well, answered, hoarse with rage — "Accursed 
woman ! it is I who have come !" 

The arm3 strercbed out to embrace her lover fell at her side; 
her large eyes, dilated with unutterable terror, became fixed 
and glassy ; her lips refused to form even a cry for help ; frozen 
with the awful pressage of her fate, she stood like a statue, 
awaiting the approach of the avenger. Soon, from among the 
trees, her brother appeared, and stopped a few paces from her, 
where the full starlight fell upon bis cruel, inexorable face. 
Slowly he raised his gun, then a wild shriek burst from the 
unhappy girl; she fell on her knees and clasped her hands. 

"Amaun! amaun !" she cried, in a voice of stifled agony. 
This word, which means simply mercy, is a Turkish expres- 
sion ; but it is currently used in Greece, and another time it 
would not have been remembered from what language it was 
taken: now, if anything could have added to Costandi's im- 
placable wrath this would have done it. 

" You do well to ask mercy in Turkish ; it is a fitting word 
to be the last on the lips of a false hearted Greek ; and now, 
in your own blood, will I wash out the stain of your infamy ! 
He fired, as he spoke, with a sure and steady aim. Xantha, 
struck to the heart, fell over on her side ; and on her beauti- 
ful face, upturned to the starlight, death stamped the seal of 
its mysterious calm, effacing forever the look of horror and 
fear which had marred its loveliness in the last awful moment 
of consciousness. 

Costandi drew near and looked at her, not to mourn the 
fair young life he had destroyed, but to assure himself that 
the work was well and surely done, and that the child of their 
common parents could be false to Greece no more. Then, 
when he had fully satisfied himself that Achmet would find 
only a corpse where he had left a form of living beauty, and a 
heart boating with love, he turned calmly from the spot aud 
disappeared among the trees. 

Costandi lived many long years alter Greece had become 
free, and the Moslem driven from her fairest possessions. He 
may be living still — posaibly he is oue of those old men, of 
whom we have heard, who have renewed their youth in the 
cause of Crete, and are even now fighting hand to hand, with 
their ancient foes on her shore. ' 



SENSATIONS OF THE DYING. 

THE popular ideas relative to the sufferings of persons ou 
the point of death are undoubtedly, to a certaiu extent, 
erroneous. The appearance of extreme agony which is often 
presented under these circumstances is due to mere muscular 
agitation' independent of any extraordinary sensibility of the 
nerves of feeling. Those who die a natural death, in the very 
last stages of existence are scarcely conscious of bodily suffer- 
ing—not more than they frequently are to the attentions and 
solicitude of friends. 

Those who die by violence or accidents, undoubtedly ex- 
perience a degree of pain proportionate to the extent of the 
bodily mutilation. Hanging is doubtless an uupleasant mode 
of death ; but few, after all, " shuffle of this mortal coil '• 
more easily than those who are suspended by the neck. It is 
akin to drowning iu this respect. The blood immediately 
seeks the head, and soon deprives it of all consciousness. 
The efforts to inhale the air, which are kept up for some time 
after the cord is attached, aud which cause such violent move- 
ments of the chest aud extremities, arise from the influence 
of the spinal marrow, whose sensibility is not bo soon des- 
troyed by the congestiou of blood as that of the brain. Per- 
sons who die by decapitation most probably suffer more, 
though their pain is only momentary ; this is the case with 
those who blow out their brains The sensation produced by 
aj)all passing through the body would be difficult to describe 
by oue who has never experienced it ; bnt it is something singu- 
lar in this case that those who are shot, although the " leaden 
messenger of death" may not have penetrated any essentially 
vital organ, immediately lull to the earth, apparently under au 
irresistible feeling of their approaching return to dust, ex- 
claiming, as it were, involuntarily, "I am a dead man !" 

A dagger wouud in "the heart, for the few moments which 
are consumed in the ebbing of life, must occasion unutterable 
feelings of agony, independent of the mere sensation of 
pains in the parts sundered by the entrance of the blade. The 
rushing out of the blood at each convulsive pulsation of the 
heart must seem like the actual spectacle of the flow of lite. 

Those who are crushed to death" may not expire instantly, 
unless the cranium happens to be involved in the casualty. 
Where the skull is not fractured there is probably an incon- 
ceivable agony for a few seconds— a flushiug thought of home, 
friends and family, and all is over. Those who are cut in two 
by a heavily burdened railroad carriage must experience some 
similiar sensations. 

If the neck is broken low dowu, the person does not neces- 
sarily die on the instant. His situation is the most distress- 
ing perhaps of any which can be imagined. He may live and 
have a being for days ; but he cannot move. His face may 
express all the passions, feelings and emotions ; but beyond 
the motions of his breast and countenance, his energies do 
not go. His arms are piuioned to his side ; his legs are life- 
less ; and he essentially beholds his body in the grave, while 
he is yet in the full possession of his faculties. The least dis- 
turbance of his position is liable to launch him into eternity. 

In taking laudanum, a person exists in a state of insensi- 
bility for a length of time, a melancholy spectacle to his 
friends. In poisoning from arsenic, a great amount of Butter- 
ing is undergone. The sensibility of the stomach is exceed- 
ingly acute when inflamed ; and the effect of arsenic is to 
produce a fatal inflammation of this viscus. Prusaic acid ia 
rapid, and acts by paralyzing|the brain. 

In reflecting on the horrors which death presents under 
these different aspects of violence, the mind becomes satiated 
with disgust. We cannot do better than turn to the contem- 
plation of its features in the milder course of disease, where, 
if the mind be at ease, the final exit is made without any of 
those revolting exhibitions of bodily suffering. 

A letter from Naples mentions the following curious fact : 
" Lately, while excavations were being made at Pompeii, in 
presence of several persons of distinction, the workmen dis- 
covered a bronze vase, hermetically closed and enveloped in a 
thick crystalized crust, that having been broken and the lid 
raised, the interior of the vessel was found to contain a con- 
siderable quantity of water. As no marks of oxydation ap- 
peared within the vase, some persons present ventured to 
drink some of the liquid, and all unauimously agreed in pro- 
nouncing it clear, fresh, and of remarkable softness. As the 
destruction of Pompeii by the ashes of Vesuvius dates from 
the year 79 of our era, the water in question has been pre- 
served for nearly 1,800 years." 

Envy ought in strict truth to have no place whatever al- 
lowed it in the harat of man : for the goods of this present 
world aro so vile and low that they are beneath it ; and those 
of the future world are so vast and exalted that they are 
above it. 

Ancient Manuscripts. — The most ancient manuscripts are 
written without accents, stops or separation between the 
words, nor was it until after the ninth Century that copyist be- 
gan to leave space between words. 

Tue world's experience preaches in vain, every man think 
Og him self au exception to all general rules. 



8 



The California!!. 



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THF PURITY" OF THE LANGUAGE. 

WE think that there is such a thin? as an unwise and 
excessive conservatism in regard to innovations in the 
forms and usages of the language. Many of the freshest and 
finest productions of American writers during the last few 
years, many of those that evince the highest degree of origi- 
nality and vital power, and that seem to herald the dawn of a 
genuine end distinctive national literature that shall be neither 
an imitation nor an echo, are not written in what the finical 
purists are accustomed to style "classical English." The in- 
troduction of new words, phrases and idioms, variously classed 
as vulgarism, provincialisms, and slang, though regarded with 
such sensitive horror by pedagogues and small critics, is in- 
evitable in every living language ; and notwithstanding the 
clamorous protests of predants and grammarians it may ad- 
mit of grave doubt whether such new coinages are to be pro- 
nounced an evil. There is some reason for believing that if 
the sticklers for classical correctness in style and expression 
were to have their way, and put under ban every homebiead 
phrase freshly transferred from the talk of the people into 
literature, every collection of words and every idiom not sanc- 
tioned by the usage of the writers who are held to imitation 
as the best models of English composition, everything in 
short, that can be called "an Americanism," our language 
w.ould become stilted and bookish, and degenerate into mere 
diction so as to be no more a fit vehicle for the living thought 
of the age and country and for giving adequate expression to 
our national individuality than Latin or Greek would be. 
Addison and Steele, doubtless wrote pure and classical Eng- 
lish, and so did King James' translators of the Bible, but the 
language has changed, and we venture to think improved, as 
much since the era of the Spectator and the Tatler, as it did 
during the period that elapsed between the reign of King 
James and that of Qneen Anne. After all, there is a certain 
higher law of language, not to be found in the text books of 
grammar and rhetoric, by virtue of which its forms never can 
become fixed and rigid uutil it ceases to be the actual speech 
of a people — by virtue of which, so long as it is a living 
tongue the speaking usage continually affects and modifies the 
writing usage, so that in the course of a period longer or 
shorter, according to the conditions of each particular case, 
the books of one generation become unfamiliar and uncouth, 
if not positively unintelligible to a succeeding one. There 
are few of us who can read Chaucer, or even Shakspeare, with- 
out feeling the necessity of frequent recourse to a glossary 
and the time will probably come when Swinburne and Tenny- 
ion, Longfellow and Whittier will seem equally old-fashioned 
to the student of a future generation. Nor is this gradual 
change and progress a thing to be deplored. It is more de- 
sirable that the language of literature should receive fresh ac- 
cessions from the common speech of the people, than 
that the latter should become formal, bookish, and pre- 
cise. The former process imparls force and vigor ; the 
latter tends to take away picturesqueness and color. 
Every one must have often observed in the conversation of 
uneducated persons of natural shrewduess and observation, a 
peculiar description and narrative power such as is self uttaiu- 
ed by men of literary culture— a quality at which Lowell 
hints when he says of " Uncle Reuben's" story : 

"I could not tfive his language token through ran 
The gazny flavor of I lie bookless man. 
Who shapes a word before the fancy cools.'' 
It is Scott's marvellous skill in initiative, or rather perhaps 
in reproducing pithy idiomatic language of the common peo- 
ple, that gives such unrivalled vigor and spirit to his dialogue, 
and occasionally to his narrative when put into the mouth of 
one of his characters. The story of " Wandering Willie" the 
blind fiddler in " Red Gauntled," and the conversation of old 
Peter Peebles in the same novel, are stifling instances of this. 
Upon the whole, we are not sorry to observe that the fear of 
the schoolmaster who feels bonud to take up the battle-axe 
in favor of " pure English" and to make war against home- 
.bred phrases and idioms, is not as strong with the rising gen- 
eration of authors as it was with their predecessors, and we 
»'".her be greatly surprised nor afflicted if the next 



THE PRESS AND THE POLITICIANS. 

E of the " lessons " that may be learned from the 
nomination of Mr. Gorham for the office of Governor, 
would seem to be that the Press is, so far from being omni- 
potent iu political matters that the politicians can, under cer- 
tain conditions, contemn aud defy it. Whatever its power may 
be in a canvass before the people, it seems to possess scarcely 
any for influencing the preliminary arrangements of party 
managers, the making of slates aud the selection of candidates. 
These matters are controlled by a few men who make the 
practical part of politics their business, and who, disdaining 
theories aud theorists, possess a skill in managing the politi 
cal machinery by which legislators and governors are made, 
that seems like jugglery to the uninitiated. 

For many weeks past, a very large portion of the Press of 
this state has been urging the claims of Mr. Bidwell for Gov- 
ernor, while we know of but one or two papers that openly 
advocated the cause of Mr. Gorham. The latter, moreover, 
wa3 energetically opposed by the four leading papers of the 
State. Naturally enough, that portion of the public that 
derive their notions of politics from the newspapers, supposed 
that the last named gentleman had no chance of success, and 
by many it was even doubted whether he was to be regarded 
as a serious candidate. But while the " leading journals " 
were declaiming about the candidates, the managing politi- 
cians, concerning themselves little as to what the editors and 
writers might soy or leave unsaid, gave their whole attention 
to those practical details that have a vast deal more to do 
with securing party nominations than any quantity of " able 
leaders." Mr Gorham's friends did their work wetland thor- 
oughly, but so quietly, at the same time, that it was not until 
just on the eve of the meeting of the Convention, that the gen- 
eral public became aware that he was a formidable candidate. 
The result shows clearly, that a few sharp and experienced 
" workers " can accomplish more toward securing a party nom- 
ination than a powerful newspaper combination. 



An Unjustifiable Attack. — A weekly paper, ostensibly 
devoted to sporting matters, but which appears lately to have 
lent itself to parties wishing to avail themselves of a vehicle 
for personal attacks dictated by interested or malicious mo- 
tives, has recently published a very long article entitled " The" 
Sutter Street Railroad Company" which is in reality a series 
of charges agaiust a private citizen, The whole subject 
matter of the attack, is of a purely business character, and 
one that the public is not the proper tribunal to decide ; and 
no person of ordinary sagacity can fail to see at a glance that 
the article referred to is simply a prejudiced and ex parte 
statement, in regard to a business controversy, prepared by 
one of the parties to that controversy, the publication of 
which as an editorial, is a violation of respectable journalis- 
tic usage. If any portion of the stockholders of a street 
railroad company are in favor of a change in the board of 
directors, the best mode of accomplishing the object is not to 
procure the publication of articles on the subject in the news- 
papers. Such a course, is especially objectionable, when, as 
in the present case, the appeal to the public is unfair aud one 
•ided, besides being bitter in spirit, coarse in manner, and 
abounding in distorted statements of alleged facts. 



DRAMATIC AFFAIRS. 

AT Maguire's Opera House the Martinetti balUt and pan- 
tomime seasou closes to-night with The Night Owl. 
On Monday the Young American tragedian, Edwin Adams of 
whom we have heard such good accounts from' the East, will 
commence an engagement, opening in Hamlet. The public 
will greet with joy the restoration of the legitimate drama to 
the stage of Maguire's Opera House which has been for too 
long a time given up to " Functions," legs and pantomime. 
Now we may hope for something which will appeal to the in- 
tellect, as well as to the heart and the eyes. Everyone of cal; 
tivated taste must hope that Edwin Adams will prove accepta- 
ble to the public of San Francisco. 

At the Academy of Music the De Lave Family of acrobats 
and gymnasts made their appearance on Thursday to a crowd- 
ed house. The most daring feats performed by the Japanese 
are certaiuly excelled uy the perilous leaps of the brave little 
Lilla and Zoe. The tight rope ascension from the stage to 
the gallery, made by M. De Lave, is ti wonderful and graceful 
performance. The De Lave family have made an immense hit 
Our fickle public have quite given up their quondam pets, the 
Japanese, and now worship the young female gymnasts. 

The usual matinee will take place at Maguire's Opera 
House, aud at the Academy of Music the De Lave troupe 
will give one of their wonderful performances at 2 p. m. to- 
day. 

The engagement of the Great Dragon Troupe of Japanese 
at the Metropolitan Theater closes to-night, and on Tuesday 
they will proceed to the East. 

Mrs Laura Cuppy has returned from Stockton and will 
deliver a lecture on " Isms" to-morrow evening at Mechanics' 
Institute Hall. Touchstone. 



The Monitor makes a mild reply to our comments upon the 
tone of its strictures upon Bishop Kip, and undertakes to 
justify the coarseness of its attack upon the ground that the 
Episcopal Bishop was the aggressor, he haviugjeharacterized 
the Church of Rome in his address to the Episcopal Con- 
vention, as "a gigantic system of superstition." The Bishop 
had a perfect right, in addressing his own clergy, to speak of 
the Church of Rome in any terms which he deemed just. He 
was not speaking to the public at large, and Roman Catholics 
have no just ground of offence in his language. 

Much interest and curiosity are felt as to the course which 
the Bulletin, Alia, and the Sacramento Union will pursue in 
reference to the nomination of Gorham for Governor. The 
course pursued by those papers has been such as to make .it 
an exceedingly awkward business for them to support him, 
and yet it is difficult to see how they can bolt the nomination 
without losing their status as Union organs The Times has 
promptly signified its adhesion to the " powers that be," by 
placing the nominations of the Sacramento Convention at 
the head of its columns. 



shall 



•' Dictionary of Americanisms" 
twice as many pages as (he last. 



shall be found to contain 



Am. the journals that have strong Democratic leanings and 
yet hesitate from prudential considerations openly to espouse 
the Democratic cause, seem to be peculiarly anxious for the 
nomination of Gen. Rosecranz as the caudidute of that party 
for the office of Governor. Such a nomination would furnish 
a neat and graceful bridge by which persons who would like to 
help the Copperhead cause without incurring the odium that 
attaches to it, can pass over to their friends. 



Politics and Philosophy. — So far as abstract qne&tions 
are concerned, there can, of course, be no compromise be- 
tween right and wrong. But what is inadmissible in theory 
is often wise and necessary in practice. So far as theory is 
concerned, we look for ideal perfection ; bnt in practice we 
must often be conteut, temporarily at least, with what is prac- 
ticable and attainable, Precisely at this point commences the 
difference between the philosopher and the statesman. The 
former deals with theories and principles, the latter, with 
measures. Expediency, circumstances, and present surround- 
ings which are not admitted as elements in the calculations of 
the one, have a powerful influence with the other. In politics 
there can be no real issue in regard to principles— at least 
no practical issue ; for such an issue can only arise when the 
abstract ideas and philosophical theories of hostile parties 
have been reduced to the shape of practical measures. Votes 
cannot be taken, nor political campaigns conducted upon ab- 
stract issues, or questions of principle unassociated with pro- 
posed measures. Every political party is, indeed, in some 
sense, the embodiment of an idea, but that idea must find 
embodiment in a shape that has reference to action. 

Simple as these propositions may seem, it is from not per- 
ceiving their truth that much of the acrismony of our politi- 
cal warfare springs. Practical politicians, who wish to do the 
best that circumstances and the nature of the case will ad. 
mit for the time being, misunderstand the theorists whom 
they denounce as visionaries, abstractionists, radicals, etc., and 
are in turn misunderstood by them. Thus, men of strong 
convictions, like Thaddeus Stevens, Wendall Phillips, and 
Charles Sumner, are prone to accuse practical statesmen who 
are coutentto aim at what is attainable, of sacrificing princi- 
ple to expediency, and the cases are exceedingly rare where 
either of these diverse orders of mind is capable of doing jos- 
tice to the other. 



The New York Herald has hit upon a plan of reconstruc- 
tion which will, it thinks, speedily restore harmoney between 
the North and the South. This novel plan is for the Demo- 
crats to nominate a presidentialjjticket consisting of Gen. 
Grant for President and Gen. Lee for Vice President. 



The Fourth of July. — The probabilities are that the 
coming anniversary of our National Independence will be 
very generally celebrated- The subscriptions are coming in 
quite freely, by the aid of the active and earnest endeavors of 
the Collection Committee ; the societies are responding 
cheerfully to the invitations extended to them to participate 
in the procession, and all things look favorable for a good 
old-fashioned celebration. Of coarse, the grand display of 
fireworks will wind up the day's festivities, and we trust that 
lame appropriate place may be chosen for their display, so 
that the public may not find themselves gathered in their 
rear inhaliug their smoke aud the villainoas odor of saltpetre 
with no chance of seeing them, as wa3 the case last year. 

Would not the Western side of Telegraph Hill, just above 
the line of Kearny street, from Filbert to Greenwich streets, 
be a suitable place? The location is elevated, aud affords an 
extended range of vision from Washington Square, and the 
whole Northern and Western portions of the city ; besides 
the prevailing western wiuds would blow the smoke away ovtr 
the hill to the leeward without it intercepting the vision. If 
we must pay for fireworks let the public have the best oppor- 
tunity possible to see them. • 

Woodward's Gardens — Au immense number of visitors 
flock to these lovely gardens every day. There so many at- 
tractions that everyone is pleased. Many a cosy little picnic 
takes place under the shady bowers. 



The C alifor nian. 



9 



SUNDAY SCHOOL ADDEESS. 

BY JOHN QUILL. 

[One of the invariable characteristics of genius, is its tendency to 
provoke imitation. The following, evidently had its inspiration in 
•' Mark Twain's" "Bad Little Boy," and would in all probability 
have never been written had not its author seen appreciated, and 
admired its prototype.] 

rpHEY had a Sunday school stereopticon exhibition up 
_l_ town last week, and after the pictures were all shown, 
the superintendent asked me to address the children, I spoke 
about as follows : " I shan't say very much to the little boys 
and girls here to-day, because I havn't got much to say. Al- 
though I used to be a little boy and girl myself a great many 
years ago, I dou't think of anything that would interest 
them just uow. You remember that beautiful picture you 
have just seen of Elijah aud the bad boys. Elijah had a bald 
head, and these wicked boys made a good deal of fun of him, 
and called him hard names, aud before they could think al- 
most, two bears came out of the woods and eat them right up. 
Now this should be a warning to you never to holler at a bald- 
headed man when you see him, but to just go up quietly to 
him, like a little gentleman, and tell him he ought to buy a 
wig. Or, if your father is a barber, ask him to please buy 
some hair restorative. Never holler at him, and make fun of 
him, for wherever there is a bald head there's most always 
more or less bare about somewhere. 

Of course you all read your library book3 that you get from 
Sunday school, and you like them very much. Now you've 
noticed how the good boys in them always die before they 
grow up and have half a chance at enjoying life. It's my be- 
lief that good boys always do die young, for I can't go back 
on the Suuday school books. Therefore I don't want to ad- 
vise you to be good, for you'll certainly die, and as I don't 
care to have you die, I'd recommend you to go in and get 
wicked. Most any insurance company will insure your life if 
you're wicked. For they can afford to do it, you see. And 
you must always be areful, my dear children, to love your re- 
lations. You boys ought to be very kind to your little sisters. 
I once knew a bad boy who struck his sister a blow over the 
eye, although she didn't slowly fade away anfl die in the early 
Bummer time, when the June roses were blowing, with words 
of sweet forgiveness on her pallid lips, she rose up and bit 
him over the head with a rolling pin, so that he couldn't go 
to Sunday school for more than a month on account of not 
being able to put his best hat on. So love your little sisters, 
I say. I never had a little sister of my own, but I recollect 
that I went out once and loved another man's sister, but she 
had a wicked father, and he hurt me very much helping me off 
his frout door-steps. But you ought to love them, and al- 
ways obey your father and mother. If your father tells you 
to do a thing and your mother tells you not to, it don't make 
any difference, you've got to obey them both. I'll leave it to 
the superintendent if the Bible don't say so. 

You ought to love your teachers very much, too, and rever- 
ence them. When I went to school the boys used to love 
the teacher so much that they couldn't bear for him to even 
go out for a minute, and they put shoemaker's wax on his 
chair, so as to hold him down. And the teacher said he 
would never desert us, never, never, but he would always stick 
to us. And then he used to get down a club, about four feet 
long with a ferule on it, and do more sticking than we thought 
was necessary. He was a good teacher, though, and once 
when I asked him if he would whip me for a thing I didn't 
do, he said " no." and then I told him 1 hadn't done my sums. 
But he said he believed he'd change his mind, aud then he 
flogged me like the very nation. Still we loved that teacher, 
and when he died, the boys were so glad to see that he had a 
haudsome coffin, that they fairly slrouted for joy. 

And, my dear children, let me caution you against the sin 
of letting your angry passions rise. Fighting is a bad busi- 
ness. Dr. Watts, you know says : 

" Let dogs delight to bark and bite, 
For 'tis their nature to : 

But Satan will find some work 
For idle bands to do.'' 

Fighting is very wicked, indeed. A few years ago I knew 
a boy who was squaring off and daring people to fight him, 
and saying he could lick them, more or less, all the time. An«T 
what became of this wretched boy ? Why, one day he dared 
a fellow to knock a chip off his shoulder, and the fellow 
knocked it, and did much more knocking beside, so that the 
boy was taken deathly sick, and couldn't budge out of his bed 
for six weeks. So that the boy actually wished he had never 
seen that particular chip, in the whole course of his life. But 
he wont around and bought a brass-barreled pistol, and got 
lome other boys to make a secret society, and draw up a 
constitution. And they all swore to have revenge. But noth- 
ing much ever came of it, for the fellow who knocked off the 
chip was a big boy, and, or course, so fast as the society boys 
grew big, he grew bigger, so they thought perhaps they'd 
better let him alono. 

Another thing, boys, I want to caution you against, and 
that is ever going to the theater or the circus. I know boyi 
who always go to see the show and creep in under the tout. 

.MMMld UK>'( ImU GJ llAI Dim qilf>-WUD 'Ulvij M I. 



But they generally come to bad ends, and a tiger or a hyena, 
or some wild animal or other is absolutely certain to rush out 
and grab them by the trowsers sooner or later. So be very 
careful to keep away from all such places and go to Sunday 
school regularly. Why, I recollect just as distinctly as if it 
had been to-morrow, a boy who ran away one Sunday morn- 
ing and instead of going to school, he went a boating on the 
river, and he hadn't been gone long before a fearful storm 
came — which Jwouldu't have come if he had gone to Sunday 
school — and the boat was upset and this miserable boy was 
nearly drowned. But now listen to the result. Ah ! my dear 
children, wickedness is always punished, and this boy got to 
hate water so much that he never drank a drop afterward 
that he couldn't help, and he used to drink rum, and he died 
and filled a drunkard's grave. 

This was wrong, aud so it is to smoke and chaw tobacco, 
I had a second cousin who went out and got a chaw of tobacco 
when he was a boy, and he came home aud chawed it, and he 
sat down by the stove and he got sicker and sicker and whiter 
and whiter, and when his fond mother asked him what was 
the matter with him, he said he guessed he must have taken a 
slight cold, and than he went out and threw up with this 
wicked lie upon his lips. 

It nevor works to be a bad boy, but if all you children mind 
what I am saying to you, you'll never be bad boys, and I don't 
believe the girls will ever auyhow. But mind you mustn't he 
IkjO good. Casabianca was too good and he died miserably. 
George Washingto was good aud he died, and all the good 
boys that ever lived died. So you'd better be just a little 
good, and when you grow up maybe you'll get to be Presi- 
dent. The girls, of course, won't, but I suppose some of them 
maybe can go to congress by that time, and then you can 
blacken one another's characters as much as you've a mind to. 

AN ANCIENT BREACH OF PKOMISE. 

A CURIOUS instance of a lady availing herself, in 1540, 
of the right to appear by champion in a " breach of 
promise of marriage " case, is mentioned in the memoirs of 
Marochal de Villeville. The husband of Madame Pbillippe 
de Montepsdon having died in Piedmont without issue, she 
was left a young, rich and beautiful widow, and was sought in 
marriage by several noble suitors. Among these was the 
Marquis de Staluces to whose attentions she seemed to listen 
favorably, and she permitted him to accompany her from Turin 
to Paris. It turned out, however, that the clever dame merely 
wished to have the advantage of his escort on the journey ; 
and when she arrived at its termination she cavalierly dis- 
missed him, saying : 

" Adieu, sir; your lodging is at the hostel de3 Ursins, and 
mine at the hoitel Saint Denis, close to that of the Augus- 
tus." , 

The marbuis still persisted in his suit, but as Phillippe con- 
tinued obdurate, he asserted that she had made him a formal 
promise of marriage, and cited her to appear before the Court of 
Parliament. She came there attended by a numerous com- 
pany of friends, and having been desired by the president to 
hold up her hand, she was asked whether she had over prom- 
ised marriage to the marquis, who was then present in court. 
She answered upon her honor that she had not ; and when the 
court proceeded to press her with further questions, she ex- 
claimed, with passionate warmth ; 

"Gentlemen, I never was in a court of justice before, and this 
makes me fear that I may not answer properly, but to put a 
stop to all captious cavailing and word-catching, I swear in 
the face of this assembly, of. Heaven and the King — to the 
King, under the penalty of I033 of honor and life — that I have 
never given pledge or promise of marriage to the Marquis de 
Saluces, and, what is more, that I never thought of such a 
thing in my life. And if there is anyone who will assert the 
contrary, here is my chevalier, whom I offer to maintain my 
words, which he kowns are entirely true, and uttered by the 
lips of a lady of honor, if ever there was one. This I do trustiug 
in Heaven and my good right, and that he will prove the 
plaintiff to be (begging the pardon of the court) a villainous 
liar." This spirited defiance caused no little sensation in the 
audience, and the president told the registrar that he might 
put up his papers, for Madame Marechale had taken another 
aud much shorter road toward settling the dispute. Then, ad- 
dressing the marquis, he asked ; 

" Well, sir, what say yon to this challenge ?" 

But the love, as well as the valor of the latter, was fast 
oozing away ; and the craven knight answered by a very de- 
cided negative : 

" I want not," said he, " to take a wife by force ; and if she 
does not wish to have me, I do not wish to have her." 

And so, making a low obeisance to the court, he prudently 
retired, and the fair Phillippe heard no more of his preten- 
tions to her hand. 



Be pure but not stern ; have moral excellences, but don't 
bristle with them. 

It is a very easy thing for a man to be wise for other 
people. 



LOCAL ART NOTES. 

GUETIEREZ has exhibited at Snow & Roos' another of 
his fine portraits, fully equal in point of execution, to 
his previous efforts. Such success in portraiture gives evi- 
dence of power to excel in other branches of art, and we hope 
to see some work from his hands establishing his claim to the 
designation of " Historical Painter " which his professional 
card gives him. 

Marple's last production shown at the same place, repre- 
sents a very brilliant beach Bcene, and is the most effective 
picture we have seen from his hand. ■ The rock in the fore- 
ground is rather stiff and bare, and might be much improved 
without lessening the effect of the picture, but there is -such 
boldness in the design and execution comparing it with his 
other paintings that in our gratification at his marked progress 
we are inclined to lose sight of its slight defects. 

Young's view of Mt. Shasta, also shows considerable im- 
provement in style, but he is hardly ripe for such subjects yet, 
and simple studies of the details of landscape which are here 
much neglected and badly arranged, would do him more 
credit. m 

Wandesforde has a lake scene at Jones and Wool's. We 
cannot omit a protest against the bluenss of his skies and 
water. It cannot be natural, and it certainly is not pleasant 
to the eye. Even if such depth of color were true to. nature, 
he should give the other portions of the landscape a corres- 
podning tone, which he has not done, except, perhaps, in a few 
bright red patches upon the rocks in the foreground. His 
foliage is entirely wanting in freshness and brilliancy, causing 
a lack of harmony that is almost painlul to the eye. 

Keith has made a trip to the Summit, and returned with a 
portfolio of interesting sketches, which will shortly be given 
to the public in his excellent water-color drawings. 

Many of our artists are absent from the city on sketching 
tours and will soon return with material for a winter's work. 
It seems to us that they have started out too late in the sea- 
son to fiud the best colors in the landscapes, but we shall 
gladly welcome them back if they bring with them some other 
subjects for their skill than the much absurd Yosemite. 

__ ASTR^EA. 

Effects op Imagination.— The mysterious influence exer- 
cised by the mind over the body is well illustrated in the fol- 
lowing.case contained in Dr. Warren's treatise on the preser- 
vation of health : " Some time since, a lady presented her- 
self to me with a tumor, or swelling of the submaxillary gland 
of the neck. It was about the size of an egg, had lasted two 
years, and so very hard that I considered an effort to dissipate 
it by medicine to be in vain, and advised it to be removed by 
an operation. To this the patient could not bring her mind ; 
therefore, to satisfy her wish, some applications of considera- 
ble activity were directed to be made to the part, and these 
she pursued a number of weeks without auy change. After 
this, she called on me, and, with some hesitation, begged to 
know whether an application recommended to her would, in 
my opinion, be safe. This consisted in applying the hand of a 
dead man three times to the diseased part. One of her neigh- 
bors now lay dead, and she had an opportunity of trying the 
experiment, if not thought dangerous. At first, I was dis- 
posed to divert her from it, but, recollecting the power of im- 
agination, gravely assured her that she might make the trial 
without apprehension of serious consequences. A while after, 
she presented herself once more, and, with a smiling face, in- 
formed me she had used this remedy, and on examining for 
the tumor it had disappeared." 

The Opera. — The second seaian of the Italian Opera at 
the Academy of Music was not inaugerated. The lack of 
sufficient support being the cause. And yet San Francisco 
boasts of her liberality in operatic matters, when she is far be- 
hind some of the old sleepy cities of Germany. The people 
of Leipsic, for instance, have decided to build one of the most 
sumptuous theatres on the continent. Leipsic is not a great 
city, (only eighty-seven thousand inhabitants), but in the 
musical world it occupies high rank — for even the London 
Musical World is compelled to say that its performances sur- 
pass those of the metropolis its-elf. 

The proprietors of the new rolling-mill at Portsmouth, 
Ohio, are in possession of the true secret of Russian iron, 
directly from the only manufactory where it is made in 
Russia. The secret was sent to this country clandestinely, 
through the agency of a citizen of Youngstown, Ohio, and a 
relative he had in the iron works of Russia. It was sent, a 
word at a time, in along correspondence. Russia has heretofore 
kept a close monopoly on this superior iron, and has been able 
by it to extort from us as well as other nations a heavy reve- 
nue. 

Pacific Museum. — The wonderful models to be seen at thin 
institution afford food for much useful reflection. 

It is bliss to learn lessons in love, for woman is our teacher J 

To grow up to the skies, we must be planted low in the 
dust. 

Success is not genuine merit, but it is a good counterfeit. 



10 



The C a 1 i f o r n i"a n . 



PARIS DURING THE EXPOSITION. 

A T the present moment, when all eyes are directed toward 
j\. the French capital, and the great iudastrial congrega- 
tion of the whole world that is assembled there, anything that 
is calculated to furnish a graphic picture of the scene of this 
hitherto unprecedented display, is sure to prove welcome to 
the mass of intelligent readers. We have nowhere found 
more judicious and satisfactory descriptions of Paris during 
the Exposition, than those furnished by the correspondent of 
the New York Trihune. The following sketch, equally ad- 
mirable for matter and manner, is condensed from his last 
letter: " Place yourself in the brightest city of the world on 
its brightest Monday morning. Winter, long and stormy, has 
rained its last. An April without showers lifts every gauze 
from the sun, so that he lights up the broad boulevards, and 
the fresh green river Seine, and shows every current setting 
for the Champ de Mars. When you climb to your house-top 
to follow the great caravans of men and wains and bauuers, 
you see around you the city of Paris, the home of two mil- 
lions of people 'floating over the undulations of a pleasant 
plain, through the middle of which, lengthwise, curves a 
stream as clear as CVotou Lake, no wider than the Passaic, 
and which, in its beautiful inutility, winds through 500 miles 
of France, without a tide or a sail. Of the two unequal parts 
into which it bisects Paris, the greater is the Northern, where 
you stand, set against an amphitheater of bills, populous to 
their summits, and bounded in the vast level tracts, near to 
the river, by two proud monuments, three miles apart. 
The one is the Arch of Triumph, to commemorate the glory of 
the original Bonaparte , the other is the shaft raised by tlin 
Republican people on the site of the Bastilo, when they had 
driven the last licentious and bloody Bourbon from the capital. 

Halfway between these uionumeuts , and in iiue with them, 
in the geometrical center of the city, lies the mighty cluster of 
palaces, whose varying tenantry have made the history of 
modem Europe. Over the oldest of them to-day a tri-color 
flag is flying to show that the most recent lessee of the Tuile- 
ries is at home. It is iu the central dome or pavilion of this 
huge building that Louis Napoleon may be found, and if we 
ascend thither we may see him, thus early, looking across the 
wood and flower garden bofore the palaco, to a vast boiler- 
like structure, that, at a mile distant, coils in the midst of a 
flat, low-lying plain in the suburbs of Paris. The Seine, be- 
neath him, reaches down to it, with frequent bridges, like a 
long bending ladder. It is upon the inferior side of the 
stream, and between it and the great Arch of Triumph, the 
opposite river bank is bold and high table-laud, vacantly and 
suburbanly furnished. This huge boiler, as it seems, is the 
crowning show, the latest of his surprises, his bid to industry 
to appease uneasy history. 

The perfectly level plain of the Champ de Mars, a year ago 
a hard parade, has been transformed into a wonderful fair 
ground, out of the midst of which arises an almost circular 
edifice of iron and glass, in shape like a vast boiler of concen- 
tric rings, pierced transversely by fifty avenues which radiate 
from a garden at the centre, where four huge fountains fling 
perpetual crystal. Under the awnings of this garden there 
are places for rest, and two of the broadest streets bisect it 
at right angles, while the two circular galleries immediately 
west of it are wholly filled with paintings and statuary. The 
outer rings are devoted to some grand department of manu- 
factures, and the nations are so arranged, iu segments propor- 
tionate to the quantity of their goods, that transverse streets 
divide them from each other. Thus, a visitor interested in 
silk, woolen, and cotton fabrics has but to keep one circular 
route continuously to pass in order the wares, in that special- 
ity, of every existing nation. AVithout, the greatest circle of 
them all, next to the park, the restaurant of each nation lies, 
its food confined to the dishes, and its liquors to those bever- 
ages which are current at home ; while the large park, encom- 
passing the whole, is taken up with the characteristic build- 
ings of particular lands, and experimental structures appar- 
tainiug to the arts, sciences, and amusements. The borders 
of the Champ de Mars, on the extreme outer rectangle, are 
lined with large warehouses where great pieces of machinery 
are exposed ; and the gates or turn-stiles giving admission to 
the whole, are placed at frequent intervals betweeu these 
warehouses or annexes. The classification, both as to Palace 
and grounds, extends to the five continents, and, the Monroe 
Doctrine being sciupulously respected, we shall find the thir- 
teen States arrayed with Mexico, Peru, and Patagonia, while 
Great Britian and Fiance divide about half the world between 
them. 

The Exhibition is meant to be a complete epitome of the 
world, performing within its grounds all the functions of all 
races — sleeping only excepted. The steam that drives the 
engines, the folly that relieves toil, the drinking, eating, and 
worshiping. of every species of man must be manufactured and 
warehpused here. You see, out of the infinite number of tow- 
trs and roofs that at first confuses you, abroad vestibule, wide 
as Broadway, 800 feet iu length, opening straight from the 
bridge of Jena to the Palace. This is canopied with green 
vellum, spangled with golden bees, the emblem of the Bona- 



partes, and every foot of it surmounted with the flag of an in- 
dependent nation. Flowers and statues line it on either side ; 
the Imperial tri colors, banderolles, and orifiammes are flung 
from two great gonfalon masts at the portal ; on the roof of 
the Palace, climbing through the sky as if the tinted clouds 
had descended to wreathe it, all the colors of each nation 
wave ; and in the angle between the long vestibule and the 
deep curve of the Palace, the broad, white ermine, bright with 
bees, stcetched upon the sceptre and cross, denotes the pavilion 
of the Emperor. The buildings in the Park are capped with 
fanciful flags, indicative of their purposes ; yonder you see the 
crescent of the Turk dominating his mosque, and the croch- 
eted pagoda? tell of Thibet and the land of tea ; the frowning, 
sepulchral portals of the Egyption ndjoio the more intellectual 
effigies of the Assyrian lion, where lie sucking their pipes the 
pure skiuued Persians ; high over all a lighthouse pierces the 
sky, and the twinkle of waters among the trees denotes the 
ripple of artificial lakes that discharge under an iron bridge 
into the animated Seine. A railway depot, whose rails go fly- 
ing through the air and sapping a block of houses alternately 
to pass the river and thread the city, is equaled in spacious- 
ness, nearest the eye, by a great international club-house for 
the bourse of the world. Past and beyond all, the far-sweep- 
ing valley of the river goes ; to the right among the purple 
and palaced hills, and dark forests ; to the left, under its mar- 
ble bridges, a score in number, pointing at its various angles, 
now to the far dome of the Pantheon, now to the towers of 
Notre Dame, uow to the steep of Montmatre and the tomb- 
stones in the groves of Pere la Chaise. 

Twice the dimensions of the great circle of the Exhibition, 
which has been not inaptly compared to a, monstrous gasom- 
eter, is the park environing it, 1,000 yards in length and in 
breadth 300. Sixty edifices are interspersed in this ; 2,000 
trees of good umbrageous growth are plauted in it ; five lakes 
and three waterfalls lie in its cool grasses ; it is intersected, 
with artistic irregularity, by 70 paths and drives, and it con- 
tains one edifice of every architecture known to civilized man. 
If you enter from the great portal on the side of the Seine, 
and turn off the broad vestiblo to either side, you meet suc- 
cessively a Spanish theater, where the Oitanos dance to the 
clinkling pulses of castiuets ; a Chinese booth, where joug- 
leurs impale each other and eat red-hot fire ; a Protestant 
chapel, where there is worship every day and in the English 
language ; a hospital, where any wounded in the crush of 
multitudes or by machinery receive speedy relief ; an Egyptian 
cemetery in gorgeous Moresque ; a French ball where the 
girls in the cancan throw their feet into the spheres, waltzing 
eccentrically to the music of " Fra Diavolo ;" an international 
theater, where, at alternate hours, a troop of every known 
nation, from Fetish dancers to negro minstrels make hilarity ; 
a lake of clear water filled with the trout of Fontainbleau 
that Bonaparte used to feed, a tropical aquarium where you 
can see a weak copy of Hugo's Devil Fish, catching spiders 
and minnows as a lady's fan catches hearts ; a Gothic cathe- 
dral, brown as if with age, and pompous with masses from 
noon till dark ; chalets of the Swiss, such as grow on Alpiue 
tops, with real chamois grazing on their miniature precipices ; 
Swedish and Russian shops and huts, grotesquely carved, 
where candles are sold as articles of food, and the reindeer's 
horns brauch from the gables ; a mock harem, inhabited by 
real Georgian girls, not prepossessing enough to keep close 
in their country ; many Chinese pagodas, all of porcelain, 
where Confucius looks contempt at the outside barbariaps ; 
Japanese households, with two of their countrywomen, and a 
pair of little-footed wives or grass widows from China, smiling 
like a coople of almonds with double kernels in them ; strange 
houses for rare lamps and engines ; cooking-furnaces that 
make such dishes as would turn a Christian stomach 
though It had forty coats ; innumerable pavilions of 
rustic patterns, scaled by kissing flowers with thirsty cups ; 
kiosques and orchestral stations, which blow music and the 
tinkle of bells on every quivering sunbeam ; tents such as are 
spread by the Arabs when they open the Thousand and One 
Nights and call the Genii into their opium smoke ; observa- 
tories where the telescopes swing all day ; and tiny livers 
trickling off through pearly bottoms, turning little mills ; 
while in the air great wind-wings turu lazily, as in a Dutch- 
man's dream, and over all the light-house, 130 feet in the 
clouds, flings its solid calcium glare iuto the constellations., to 
rival their fixed blaze. The garden is a green convalescence 
after the cramped splendor of the Exhibition, when the tints 
of a Continental day mock the-painted glasses of the Babel 
interior ; here stroll the little girls, half-way over womanhood, 
the soft lights fading from their faces and the ruddiness of 
thoughtful and dawning ambitions making deeper tints, while 
the great English dames stagger down the walks in the boef- 
ness of their middle age, and florid ladies of Germany, all of 
one fervid flax, rise up in the perspective like some metamor- 
pharized fields of overripe grain. Among these you see the 
American girl, delicate eyed, speaking heart, and thought and 
purity in every modest step, light of foot and shy of presence, 
the noblest and leas imitable contribution the world has given. 
At night, when the hammers are quiet within the broad pal- 
ace, and iu the grasses the tapers glisten as if they were 
burning drops of dew, the gaieties of the garden start iuto 
life, aod in the cafe's cha/Uant the globes of light fall upon 
beautiful singers, twirling the tambourine." 



HOW TO DRESS WELL. 

IN an old uumber of AH the Year Round, we find the fol- 
lowing : " As you look from your window in Paris, observe 
the first fifty women who pass ; forty have uoses depressed in 
the middle, a small quantity of dark hair, and a swarthy com - 
plexion ; but then, what a toilet I Not only suitable for the 
season, but to the age and complexion of the wearer. How 
neat the feet and hands ! How well the clothas are put on , 
and, more than all, how well they suit each other I" 

We have often said the same thing in other words. Before 
our English women can dress perfectly, they must have the 
taste of the French, especially in color. One reason why we 
see colors ill-arranged in this country is, that the different ar- 
ticles are purchased each for its own imagined virtues, and 
without any thought of what it is to be worn with. Women, 
while shopping, buy what pleases the eye on the counter, for- 
getting what they have got at home. That parasol is pretty, 
but it will kill by its color one dress in the buyer's wardrobe, 
and be unsuitable for all others. To be magnificently dressed 
certainly costs money ; but, to be dressed with taste, is not 
expensive. It requires good sense, knowledge, refiuemeut. 
Never buy au article, unless it as suitable to your age, habits, 
style aud to the rest of your wardrobe. Nothing is more vul- 
gar than to wear costly laces with a common delaine, or 
cheap laces with expensive brocades. 

What colors, we may be asked, go best together? Green 
with violet : gold with dark crimson or lilac ; pale blue with 
scarlet; pink with black or white ; and grey with scarlet or 
pink. A cold color generally requires a warm tint to give life 
to it. Grey and pale blue, for instance, do not combine well, 
both being cold colors. White aud black are safe wear, but 
the latter is not favorable to dark or pale complexious. Pink 
is, to some skins, the most becomiug : not, however, if there 
is much color in the cheeks or lips ; and if there be even a 
suspicion of red either hair or complexion. Peach-color is 
perhaps one of the most elegant colors worn. Maize is very 
becomiug, particularly to persons with dark hair and eyes. 
But whatever the color or material of the entire dress, the 
details are all in all ; -the lace rouud the bosom and sleeves, 
the flowers ; in fact, all that furnishes the dress. If trimmed 
with black lace, some of the same should be worn in the head, 
and the flowers that are worn in the hair should decorate the 
dress. 



Music or Solomon's Temi-le. — The disentombing of As- 
syrian sculptures and the deciphering of Assyrian and Egyp- 
tian inscriptions, have opened new fields of investigation in 
almost every department of masonic knowledge. Among the 
branches of science which have shared in these discoveries, 
that of music has been benefited largely. The accounts of 
ancient musical instruments were vague, and our ideas, espec- 
ially of Hebrew music, were confused, till recently sculptures 
and paintings have been brought to light which delineate the 
musical instruments of early Oriental nations, and in a nam 
ber of cases veritable specimens have been disentombed. 
Such, in oxample, is an Egyptian harp found in Thebes, with 
its strings yet perfect enough to vibrate again, after a silence 
of three thousand years. 

The more recent investigations prove that the parents of 
all known musical science is Assyria. From the Assyrians, 
the Hebrews, and the Egyptians, and, indeed, all Eastern na- 
tions, derived their kuowledge of music. The unveiled moo- 
uments show th it in the time of Sennacherib, music was a 
highly cultured art, aud must have existed through generations. 
This polished nation used a harp of twenty strings, the frame, 
of which was four feet high, 'which accompanied minstrel 
songs, or was borne in the dauce~ The lyre of tortoise shell 
the double pipe, the trumpet, drum and bell we common. 
Even of the bagpipe, representations have been described, 
though none of stringed instruments like the violin played with 
the bow. 

In all delineations of social or worshipping asemblies, 
musical instruments very like our modern ones have a promi- 
nent place. The Hebrew music, in the time of the Exodus, 
was purely Egyptian'; but it was much modified subsequently in 
associations with Asiatic nations. In the Temple of Jeru- 
salem, according to the Talmud, stood a powerful organ, con- 
sisting of a wind chest with ten holes, containing ten pipea 
each pipe capable of emitting ten different sounds by mean* 
of finder holes, so that a hundred sounds could be produced 
by It. It was provided with two pair of bellows and ten keys, 
so that it could be played with the fingers. According to the 
Rabbins, it could be heard a great distance from the Temple, 
and some masonic historian state in the most confident man- 
ner that our Grand Master, Solomon, performed the duties of 
bis office to the music of that organ. 



Insect. Life— Insects, generally, must lead a truly jovial life. 
Thiuk what it must be to lodge in a lily — imagine a palace of 
ivory or pearl, with pillars of silver, and capitals of gold, all ex- 
haling such a perfume as never arose from gum or censer. 
Fancy, agaiu, the fan of tucking yourself up for a night in the 
folds of arose, rocked to sleep by the gentle sighs of the sum- 
mer air, and nothing to do when you awake but to wash your- 
self in a clear dew-drop, and fall to and eat your bedclothes. 



The CalifornJan. 



11 



Mn lis kb v axd Head-Dbkssiw. — Mrs. Winsliip bas juat 
received, per last steamer, the latest Parisian Millinery 
Goods and Laces for HEAD-DRESS, consisting m part ol 
Breakfast Caps, Point Application, Lace Vallenciumcs, 
and the Widow 'a Roocho. worn by tbo cruwa beads 
of Europe, and the only lirst imported to the Pacific 
Coast. Queen Emma, while here, replenished her 
wuj drobn from the stock then and now on h;tnd, at MRS 
WINSHIP, No. 23 Post Street, under the Mechanics 
Institute. Through the influence of Queen Emma, M 
Wiuship has filled quite a number of orders for the 
foreign population of Honolulu. The ladies of San Fran 
eisco should call and examine these beaut itul Goods, by 
which means they will secure the Latest Fashionable 
Styles. 



What's ni k MArrcny— In passing through Tnird street 
yesterday, we saw cruwds of people entering a buildiug 
a few doors below Market street, and we inquired of a 
passer-by whafs the matter? He answered that they 
were goiug to have their pictures taken m the NEW YORK 
PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY, and the cause of the rush 
was that this took the bestan^ cheapest pictures in the 
city; the inducement must he much to draw so big a 
crowd Ir Jin Montgomery and the other streets in the 
northern part of the city. 



Maykr's Bazaab. — R. Mayer offers at his Bazaar , corner 
Pine and Montgomery streets, the greatest variety of jew- 
elry, watches, silver plat»<d ware, guitars, music boxes 
concertinas, accordeons, opera glasses, etc., etc., to the 
public of Sau Francisco, and to the couutry trade, at prices 
that defy competition, and la determined to close out bis 
present stock at greatly reduced rates. His heavy case 
sliver watches from the American Watch Company are 
superior to anything ever before olfered to the public, 
These watches are taking the place of heavy gold watches 
from the fact that the workmanship is superior, the cas- 
ings pure silver, and the prices low. The sale of these 
watches is very extensive on the Pacific coast. Auother 
pronl thai American manufactures can beat the world, 
The works are made of platma and never get out of re- 
pair. French opera glasses of great power for sale or 
hire, and all kinds of musical instruments, eight day fam- 
ily clocks, etc. This is a rare chance to invest your money 
to advantage, at Mayer's Bazaar, sontbeast corner of 
Montgomery and Pine streets. 

N. B. — An immense assortment of Japanese curiosities 
for sale. 



WAGONS. 



MILLS& EVANS, IMPORTERS OP THOROUGH-BRACE 
Wagons, light express, two and three spring Wagous 
suitable for milk-men and furniture dealers, and others 
ishiog light and durable Wagons. Their Wagons are 
nale expressly lor the California market, and Mills k 
vans' is the only Urm which recoives Wagons from th< 
labratud manufactory of A. W. Sunburn 4i Co., Man 
heater, N. H. This latter tlrm .stands A No. 1 in the 
ist, an 1 their wagons have stoo 1 Iho test of our Caiifor 
lU clmitte, aud are sold by Mills & Evaus HI ty per ceut 
ower than any other establishment on the Pacilic coast, 
.-all and examine their Wagons, at No. 6S7 Market street, 
pposite the Metronolitau market. * 



Mudical— '• Yousii Man's Friend and Pkoiectob," 
Uaociation for beneficent objects, Young men should 
jform themselves in rotation to it, and by applying to 
he AcriMBY, Dr. Bourne, 10 Masonic Temple, Poat street, 
hey will be lurnished with Prospectus. 



• WONDERFUL BUT TRUE.— MADAME REMING- 
>n, the world renowned Astrologistand Somnambulistic 
Utrvoyant, while in a clairvoyant state, delineates the 
>ry features of the person you are to marry, and by 
le aid of an instrument ol intense power, known as 
le Psychomotrope, guarantees to produce a perfect and 
leliko picture of the luture husband or wile of tue 
iplicaut, with date of marriage, occupation, leading 
aits ol character, etc. This is no imposition, as testi- 
monials without number can assert. By stating place 
I birth, age, disposition, color of eyes and hair, and ou- 
osiug Ufty cents and stamped envelope addressed to 
turself, you will receive the picture by return mail, 
gethur with desired information. 

Address in conlldence, Madame Gkbtrude Remington, 
O. Box M, West Troy, N. Y. 



MEDICAL ADVICE. 
Dr. Wm. K. Doherty's Medical and Surgicai 
ititute is becoming a sine qua non to the welfare 
our State and health of our citizens ; and his 
ndly spreading reputation, although it may excite 
prise, is but the sigual of skill, and follows as the 
;ural effect of such a cause. We are personally 
[uainted with gentlemen who had suffered for 
trs under chronic disease, and who had takeu ad- 
ltage of every available means that promised 
lef, but with'out success, until they called upon 
Doherty. who, in an incredibly short space of 
e, has given them entire relief. It is gratifying 
nnouuee this fact, because the Doctor is a geutle- 
l who seeks, not by defamation of others, to es- 
Iwh his reputation, or to rear the superstructure of 
own upon the ruin of another's fame. The Doc 
conducts his Institute in a manner that must be 
lifyiog to all his patients. He examines, hears, 
iaes, and recommends, without charge, and the 
ent, after hearing his terms for treatment, can 
ipt or reject at pleasure. In no case does the 
itor make a charge unless he effects a cure. This 
is able to do, because he feels the confidence 
ch loug experience has given, and no doubt the 
lolatiou which appertains to that confidence, 
ions afflicted with either acute or chronic disease 
lid do well to consult the Doctor ; at all events' 
.n do no harm, as for consultation he asks no fee • 
does he insist on obedience to his advice unlets 
patient places himself under his care His offices 
>u Sacramento street, opposite the Pacific Mail 
"""hip office. — San Francisco News. 



0 0,0 00 CIGARS 
At $5 per Thousand, 

FOR SALE BY 

C HORN & CO. 

FRONT STREET, CORNER OP CLAY, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



TOWNE & BACON, 
Book and Job Printers, 
Have the Largest Office, 
Do the most work, 
And do it better 
Than other offices 
mm 0^ gm^ In this City, 

536 T ry them 
%# WW With a Job, 
And you will be 
Satisfied the above 
Statements are facts. 
Their offiee is at 536 
Clay St., below Montgom'y, 
Over Pacific Fruit Market. 



Edward Bosqui & Co., 

Printers, 

And Blank Book Manufacturers, 
517 CLAY STREET, 

Between Montgomery and Sansome Su., 
San Francisco. 



POSTERS, HANDBILLS, 

Show Work of All Kinds, 

GO TO THE 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING HOUSE 

OF 

FRANCIS & VALENTINE, 
517 Clay street, and 610, 512 aud 514 Commercial street 



J) 0 YOU WANT ANY 

PRINTING? 

IF YOU DO, GO TO 

4 11 CLAY STREET, 

BETWEEN SANSOME AND BATTERY. 



PRINTING OF EVERY DESCRIPTION DONE ON 
short notice and iu the best style, by 

M. D. CARR & CO. 



San Francisco Mill. 



H0BBS, GIL MORE k CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

BOXES, 

Market Street, hetween Beale and Main, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



For Sale, Mahogany, Spanish Cedar, ami other Fancy 
Woods. 



I). A. MACDONALD 
J. H. HiCDONALO 



:•} 



{a' 



MCU1LL, 

cairjiAN. 



D. A. MACDONALD & CO., 
SAWING AND PLANING MILLS, 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
DOORS, SASHES, BLINDS A^JD MOULDINGS, 

Corner o f Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Finishing Work for Buildings constantly on hand, 
and got up to order. 



W. N. Mil!. EE. 



.J. r. iiiii-] 



jyjILLER & HALEY, 

EMPIRE STEAM MILLS, 

NO. Q9 FREMONT STREET, 
San Francisco. 
SASH, BLIND, DOOR AND MOULDING FACTORY. 



JOHN HAGAN, 

Marble - Worker, 

MARKET ST , OPPOSITE LINCOLN SCHOOL 
HOUSE, between Fifth'and Sixth. 

Marble Maitels, Grates, MonumeDti, Head-' 
stones, Cemetery Copings, and all kiuds of! 
Marble Work executed on most reasonable! 
terms. Particular attention paid to the placing j 
of Tombstones at Lone Mountain or CalvaryL^ 
Cemeteries. N. B. — Country orders promptly attended to. 




IJ^OYS! BOYS! BOYS! 

NOW IS THE TIME 
H. M. LOCKWOOD A* CO., 
Now No. 624) CLAY STREET, (Old No 

Have received a Largo Stock of 

GENTS' AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

— AND — 

FURNISHING GOODS, 
Which they are selling 

AT VERY LOW PRICES. 
Every Garment warranted. All are invited to call 
examine our goods. 

H. M. LOCKWOOD & CO. 

624 Clay street, San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Foundry and Machine Works, 

Northeast corner Fremout and Mission streets, 
Manufacturers of 
MARINE AND STATIONARY ENGINES, 
Quartz Machinery, Saw, Flour and Sugar Mills, Mining 
Pumps, Hoisting Gear, Agricultural Implements, etc. 

ALSO, 

Wine, Cider, Cotton and Tobacco Tresses of the latest 
Improved Patterns. 



jnr^HE CALIFORNIA 

Building and Savings Bank, 

CALIFORNIA ST., ONE DOOR FROM SANSOME. 
Capital and Deposits, ----- $600,000 

WHICH IS LOANED ON PROPERTY. 

LOANS MADE on CITY REAL ESTATE, 
HOUSES, SHIPS, FACTORIES 
AND MERCHANDISE. 

Deposits received at one per cent, per monih. 

M"uey transmitted from the interior, by Express or 
Mail, passed to interest from the day ol arrival, and a 
Certificate returned in course of post. 

Strangers may deposit Bonds, Gold Dust, Coin, or Valu- 
able Papers in the Vault, for long or short periods, at a 
small rei t, for which valuables the Coinpuu" will be 
accountable, THOMAS MOONEY. President 



STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS, 

Of all sizes, constantly oo hand ; Quartz Mill Shoes aud 
Dies warranted to be made of the best white iron. 
Duubar's Improved Self-Adjusting' Piston-Packing, re- 
quires no springs or screws; is alwayB steam-tight; with 
out excessive friction, and never gets slack or leakv. 

MACHINERY, OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 
Bought, sold, or exchanged. Bolt Cutting and Castings 
at the lowes t market rates. 

DEVOE, D1NSM0RE & CO. 



MARTIN'S RESTAURANT, 
623 COMMERCIAL STREET 

Above Montgomery. Meals at all hours. 
The best of Wines, Oysters, Game, and all 
the delicacies of the season always on hand. 
Private Saloons up stairs for Dinner and^ 
Supper Parties. LEON DINGEON, Proprietor. 



{JALIFORJN 1A 

COFFEE AND DINJNG SALOON, j j<aw 
(Formerly the German Coffee Saloon,)) 

NOS. 612 AND 614 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Between Clay and Merchant, San Francisco. 
J. B. REAGAN Proprietor 

This house has undergone a thorougli change, both in 
MANAGEMENT and PRICES. A fine Ladies' Saloon has 
been lilted up in the rear, where private parties can re- 
ceive every attention in the mo^t comfortable quarters. 
We also keep lunch hot on dialing dishes at the counter, 
including tbe fluest of Pastry , where customers can be 
served quickly aud satisfactorily. 

French Breakfasts and Dinners, with Wine, continued 



BONZI&CO., 

Italian Restaurant, 

515 Merchant street, opposite Washington Market, between 
Montgomery and Sansome streets, San Francisco. 

MEALS, WITH WINE, 50 CENTS. 

THE CHOICEST COMMODITIES OF THE 
Market served up in tue best style of Italian 
and French cookery. 

On the second floor are numerous private, 

roomB, fur social or private DINNER PARTI h.^. louuo, 
chocolate, Wine, Beer, Liqueurs, with every description 
ol' edible accompaniments, served to order at any nour of 
the day or evening. 



REMOVED 

To 645 Clay street, a few doors below Kearny. ■ 

DR BLAKE CAN NOW BE FOUND AT 
the above location . Engagements as usual 
can be made with all those who desire thor- 
gh and FIRST CLASS GOLD FILLINGS. 




Lamott's Hat Emporium 

IS THE PLACE TO GET A FASHIONABLE 

HAT OR CAP, 

AND AT PRICES 25 PER CENT. LESS THAN 
ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THIS CITY. 

Do not fail to have one of 

LAMOTT'S HATS! 

CORNER PINE AND MONTGOMERY STREETS. 



ALTER S. PIERCE, 

^^ijiPrjj Manufacturer find Importer of 

Hf! PIANO-FORTES. 

FACTORY AND WAREROOM, NO. 636 MARKET 
Street, uppuBite Second. 

»3. PIANOS TO RENT'S* 

WALTER "sTpIERCKS 

Piano Manufactory 

Is the most complete on the Pacific Coast, havin g every 
appliance of machinery for Makiug or REPAIRING Pianos 
to be found in the largest Eastcru Factories. 

Old Piauos converted into now, by putting in new inte- 
rior mechanism complete. 



THE FAMOUS 

P I A JN O S 

OF 

Chickering & Son 

Have received the endorsement of all the leading Artistes 
of Europe aud America. Testimonials to be seen at tbe 
Agents'. 

Pianos to rent, from $5 to $10. Tuning free. 

KOHLER, CHASE k CO., 

**1 Montgomery street. 




JgROOKLYN HOTEL, 

1852. SAN FRANCISCO. 1866. 

The Proprietor of the above-named Hotel wishes 
to iuroriu his patrons and the Travelling Public that he 
has opened that elegant Brick Fireproof Hotel, on the 

S. E. Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, 

With all the modern conveniences attached to it. 

Gas aud water are supplied throughout the House. The 
Rooms ure well ventilated, and the Public will And in this 
Hotel all the comforts of a home. The Hotel is spacious, 
and well adapted for the use of Families. Suits of Rooms 
can be had on reasonable terms. 

A Large Reading Room is attached to the Hotel. 

Containing 500 Volumes of Standard Works, 

Which is entirely for the use of patrons. 
THE CITY COACH, with the name of the Hotel on It, 
will be in readiiieB.s at the Wharf, on the arrival of each 
steamer, to convey passengers and baggage to the Hotel, 
free of charge .TOHN KELLY, Jr. , Proprietor. 



yyM. O. BREYFOGLE. 

(Successor to WARE & MOSHER,) 
NO. 26 CALIFORNIA STREET, 
Manufacturer and Dealer in 

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS & SHUTTERS, 

From Kiln-Dried Lumber— at the Lowest Rates. 
OrderB from the country will receive prompt attention 

Important Notice. 

ANOTHER DOCTOR IN THE CITY. 

DR. H. A BENTON has been performing many won- 
derful cures in this city the past two years, and as his 
practice is fast increasing at the effice, finds it difficult to 
attend outside calls, concluded to invite B. H. OLM 
STEAD, M. D., or Napa City, to Join him. Dr. Olmstead 
has been 18 years successfully treating obstinate cases, 
with water, electricity, ai d the magnetic forces, (and 
when needed, Eclectic Remedies, of which ho is a gradu- 
ate of that school) ; also, being tbe seventh son of a cele- 
brated Physician, and hav.ng a powerful organization, 
his magnetic hands, like magic, dispel pain and disease 
in a wonderful manner; he is also a natural Bone Setteh. 

DR. OLMSTEAD has this day associated with Dr. H. 
A. BENTON, the Medical Electrician and Homcepathist, 
at his office, 314 Bush street, San Francisco, who, having 
all the -necessary facilities, such as tbe Patent Electro- 
Chemical, Sulphur, Vapor, Hot Air, and Medicated Baths, 
which are valuable aids in removing all curable diseases, 
whether acute or chronic. The combined skill, together 
with the aid of an excellent Lady Assistant, gives an 
assurance of cure to many, benefit to all, ano lNJrrcr 

TO NONE. 

N. B. — Terms within reach of all. Office hours from 
9 A. m. to 8 p. M. Sundays, by appointment. 

Lodging Rooms convenieut for those from the 
couutry. 

June 1st, 18M. 



Petroleum Stoves. 



rpHE ATTENTION OF HOUSEKEEPERS AND PEOPLE 
I rooming is called to tbe use of 

MORRILL'S 
PETROLEUM STOVES, 

Whidh can be used in any room with or without chim- 
neys, as 

IT EMITS NO SMOKE, SOOT OR ASHES. 

It is a superior Cook. In fact, it does all kinds of 
Stove work as well as any (and better than most) stoves. 
It is perfectly safe. The "State Assayor having thorocghly 
tested the^e Stoves, pronounced them uon explosive. 
For sale at No. 13 Kearny street. 

1YI. B. BULLA RD, Proprietor. 

fcl. B. B. is also agent for MORRILL'S 

UNIVERSAL OIL STOVE, 

Which burns COAL OIL, BENZINE, or NAPTHA, with 
blue tlame, non luminous, iutense heat. Thero ara seven 
sizes. No. 1 is adapted to boiling water, nesting gluo, 
and Deutist's work, etc. No. 2, witb Urn for hotels, sa 
loons, boarding houses, barbers, etc. No. 3 to S for all 
kind-; of rookiug, which they do in a superior manner. 
Thry are as easily managed as a lamp, perfectly safe and 
economical. Thoy can be seen and are tor sale at 13 
Kearny street 

LAMPS. 

I have PATENT BURNERS that can be used with any 
tamp to burn Coal Oil, or the lighter products of Petio- 
let m, with PERFECT SAFETY, and GREAT ECONOMY 
I have also a HAND LAMP (to carry about tne house) 
that will burn a flame equal to a candle, with no more 
smoke or odor, at an expense of ONE CENT for EIGHT 
HOURS. 

N. B.— I am also agent for Huck's celebrated Self- 
Generating Gae Lamps. M. B. BULLARD. 



Adams, Dentist, 423 Montgomery 



12 



The Caliiornian. 



"IF I WERE A PAINTER." 

I could paint the mill stream, cat in two 

By the beat o' the Bummer skies, 
And the sand-bar, with its loug brown black, 

And round and bubbly eyes, 
And the bridge, that huugso high o'er the tide, 
Creaking and swinging from side to side. 

The miller's pretty little wile, 

In the cottage that she loves, — 
Her hand so white, and her step so light, 

And her eyes as brown as tU' doves', 
Her tiny waist, and belt of bine, 
And her hair that almost dazzles yon. 1 

I could paint the White Hawk tavern, flauked 
With broken and wjnd-warped sheds, 

And the rock where the black clouds used to sit 
And trim their watery bends 

With little springles of shining light, 

Night and morning, morning and night. 

The road, where, slow and wearily, 

The dusty teamster came,— 
The sign on its post and ronnd- faced host, 

And the high arched door aflame 
With trumpet-flowers, — the well-weep, high, 
And the flowing water-trough, close by. 

Alice Cary. 



JVO T IC E . 
J. Br anger Will Open To-Day 

THE LOUISIANA ROTISSERIE, 
DUPONT STREET, CORNER WASHINGTON. 

J BEG TO INFORM MY FRIENDS AND 
the public that TO-DAY, (SATURDAY), 
1 June 1st, I will rc-oi en the above Restau- 
I rat. t. Everything will be <loue to satisfy 
those w ho favor me with their patronage. Large Saloons 
lor parties. Hcuse will be open all night. All orders for 
the city will be promptly attended to, and with the ut 
m ist care. 

Ladies' cntrauce on Washineton street, one door above 
Dupcnt J. BRANtiER. 



A man was chopping wood belore his door 
with his children playing about him. A stran- 
ger came along and bid him good morning. 
The man replied somewhat gruffly. " Fine chil- 
dren you have, sir." "Yes." "All grown?" 
" Of course." " This is a nice little girl." 
"That's Elizer." "That's a what sir?" "That's 
Elizer." The stranger couldn't stand that, and 
immediately piched into pater familias, while 
the children ran screaming into the house. 
The noise brought out the old woman, who suc- 
ceeded in explaining matters after the bellig- 
erents had become pretty well tuckered out. 

A singular duel has just taken place at 
Berlin between a journeyman silversmith and 
another artisan. The arms selector! were a 
bottle of sulphuric acid. The arrangements 
was that whichever of the adversaries threw 
the lowest with dice, should swallow the con- 
tents of the fatal phial. Chance favored the 
silversmith, who immediately poured out a 
glass of the liquor and handed it to his adver- 
sary, who unhesitatingly drank of the liquid, 
but, to the astonishment of this antagonist, 
instead of falling senseless, smacked his lips 
and asked for another glass. The seconds had 
acted on the sensible idea of substituting ar- 
rack for the corrosive fluid. It is hardly nec- 
essary to say that the affair terminated iu a 
reconciliation. 



Thomas Paine was probably the first man 
who suggested tho practicability of construct- 
ing bridges of iron, and he conceived the idea 
from contemplating the fabrication of a spider's 
web when he was iu the United States. Ib 
1787 Paine presented to the Academy of Sci- 
ences, at Paris, the model of a bridge which he 
had invented, and when he resided at Rother- 
dam, in Yorkshire, a bridge, chieflyjof wrought 
iron, was constructed under his direction by 
the Messrs. Walker. 



Tyler Brothers, 

SfEfSfj^WX Market si., cor. Third, AfBIM iSL 

si !m " «■ n Ji. i - ' 

Importers, Wholesale ami Retail Dealers in 
SCHOOL BOOKS, 

STATIONERY", 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS, 

BLANK BOOKS, 
PORTFOLIOS, 

JUVENILE BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S PICTURE BOOKS, 

FANCY ARTICLES, Etc. 

ESPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

LADIES' STATIONERY, 

Which we Stamp with Initials 
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE. 

WEDDING AND VISITING CARDS 
Engraved, Written or Printed. 



yyM. 0. BREYFOGLE. 

(Successor to WARE Jc MOSHER,) 
NO. 2C CALIFORNIA STREET, 
Manufacturer and Dealer In 

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS k SHUTTERS, 

From Kiln-Dried Lumber — at the Lowest Rates. 
Order, front the country will receivo prompt attention 



Personal Tax Assessment 

ROLL OF SAN" FRAN CISCO — 18G7-'68. 

PUBLIC NOTICE I? HEREBY GIVEN IX ACCOR- 
dancp with Section 1 of an Act eutitled " An Act to 
provide lor tlie Collection of Taxes on Personal Property 
in tl>e City and County of San Francisco," approved 
May 9, la62, that the Personal Property Assessment List 
has been completed and delivered over to me as Clerk of 
the Board of Supervisors, and that the said Board will 
meet a« a Board of Equalization on th s the THIRD DAY 
OF JUNE, at 7 o'clock p. m., and continue in session from 
time to time until the 17th day of June, 1867, for the pur- 
pose of determining complaints In regard to errors of 
Assessment of Personal Property, and correctiug errors 
therein. The Assessment List will be open for examina- 
tion from tnis date, from 9 o'clock a. m. until 4 o'clock p. 
m., daily (Sundays excepted), during the sitting of the 
Board of Equa ization. AH applications for reduction of 
assessments are required to be made in wirilng and veri- 
fied by oath. JAS. W. BINGHAM, 
Clerk of the Board of Supervisors. 
San Francisco, June 3, 1807 

Petroleum Stoves. 



nMHE ATTENTION OF HOUSEKEEPERS AND PEOPLE 
I rooming is called to the use of * 

MORRILL'S 
PETROLEUM STOVES, 

Which can be used in any room with or without chim- 
neys, as 

IT EMITS NO SMOKE, SOOT OR ASHES. 

It is a super:' r Cook. In fact, it does all kinds of 
St >ve work as well as any (and better than most) stoves. 
It is perfectly safe. The State Afisayor having thoroughly 
tested the^e Stoves, pronounced them non explusive. 
For .-ale at No. IS Kearuv street. 

M. B. BULLARD, Proprietor. 

M. B. B. is also agent for MORRILL'S 

UNIVERSAL OIL STOVE, 

Which burns COAL OIL, BENZINE, or NAPTHA, with 
blue flame, non luminous, intense heat There are seven 
sizes. No. 1 is adapted to boiling water, heating glue, 
and Deutisfs work, etc. No. 2, with Urn fur hotels, s a 
loons, boarding houses, barbera, etc. No. 3 to 8 for all 
kinds of cooking, which they do In a superior manner. 
They are as easily managed as a lamp, perfectly Baft and 
economical. Tb*| can bes^enaud are for sale at 13 
Kearny street 

LAMPS. 

I have PATEnT BURNERS thai can be used wilh any 
'.amp to burn Coal Oil. or the lighter products of Petro- 
Iscni. witu PERFECT SAFETY, und GREAT ECONOMY. 
I have also a HAND LAMP (to carry about the house) 
that will hum a flame equal to a candle, with no more 
smoke or odor, at an expense of ONE CENT for EIGHT 
HOURS. . 

N. B — I am a'so agent for Huck's celebrated Self. 
Generating Gas Lamps. M. B. BULLARD. 



Important Notice. 

ANOTHER DOCTOR IN THE CITY. 

DR. H. A. BENTON has been performing many won- 
derful cures iu this city the past two years, and aa his 
practice (s fast increasing at the ofllce, finds it difficult to 
attend outside calls, concluded to invite R. H. OLM- 
STEAD, M. D., of Napa City, to join him. Dr. Olmstead 
has been 18 years successfully treating obstinate cases, 
with water, electricity, a» d the magnetic forces, (and 
when needed , Eclectic Remedies, of which he Is a gra-lu 
ate of that school) ; also, being the seventh nan of a cele- 
brated Physician , and hav.ng a powerful organization, 
his magnetic hands, like magic, dispel pain and disease 
in a wonderful manner; he is also a natural B"NK Scttek. 

DR. OLMSTEAD has this day associated with Dr. H. 
A. BENTON, the Medical Electrician and Homo-palhist, 
at his ofllce, 314 Bush street, San Francisco, who, having 
all the necessary facilities, such as the Patent Electro- 
chemical, Sulphur, Vapor, Hot Air. and Medicated BattiB, 
which are valuable aids in removing all curable diseases, 
whether acute or chronic. The combined skill, together 
with the aid of an excellent Lady Assistant, gives an 
assurance of clbe to many, benefit to aix, and jnjlry 

TO NONE. 

N. B. — Terms within reach of all. Ofllce hours from 
9a.il to 8t. m. ftmdays, by appointment. 

Lodgiug Rooms convenient fur those from the 

country. 
June 1st, 18G7. 



JNewly Opened. 



McKee's 



NEW GROCERY 




FAMILY FURNISHING 

Store, 

No. 31 KEARN'Y STREET, 
Third Door South of Post Street, 

NOW RECEIVING ORDERS FOR GROCERIES, PRO- 
visioos. Table Luxuries, and all Housekeeping 
article* of the beat quality at low prices. 



jy^OYNIHAtt & AITKIN, 

Portland Boiler Works, 

311 AND 313 MISSION STREET, 
Between Bea'.e aud Fremont streets, San Francisco. 

Manufacturers of Steam Boilers, high or low pressure 

Cylinder, Tubular or Flue; Sheet Iron Worfc; iteam and 
Water Pipe of the be^t quality, and at more reasonable 
prices than any other establishment on the Pacific Coast. 

Being Practical Boiler Makers, of loDg experience, con- 
fining our whole time and attention to our branch of has- 
in^ss, aud having enlarged our works, and also added the 
most improved tools m the country, we are enabled to 
turn out Boilers more expeditiously than bay other esiab- 
lishment on tho Pacific Coast — using none but tbe best 
quality and brands of Boiler and Sheet Iron and Boiler 
Tubes. Those in want of anything iu the above line will 
do well to give us a call. Orders from the country will 
receive prompt attention. 

All work warranted according to order. Particular 
attention paid to Repairing Steam Boilers. 

T. J. MOVN'IHAN, I D , . 
JAS. A1TKEN. } Proprietors. 



N 



EPTUNK IRON WORKS. 




Corner Mission and Fremont streets, San Francisco. 
MARINE, LOCOMOTIVE AND ALL KINDS OF 

HIGH- PRESSURE STEAM BOILERS 

Manufactured. 

The proprietor imports his own C. H. and B. Iron acrosB 
the Isthmus, and Tubes of every size. Other parties can 
never blocka le the market. He has male arrangements 
with the best houses in the East to furnish him with 
everything in the shape of Iron he wants. 

All Boilers guaranteed and tested by U. S. Boiler In 
spector before they are sent out of the shop, at my ex- 
pense. tgUAll kinds of .Sheet Iron and Water Pipe, I oil 
Oil Stills, Wroncht Iron Worms, etc., manufactured to 
order. OLD BOILERS REPAIRED. 

D. CAMERON. 



piON 



N EER IRON SHUTTER WORKS. 
Established 1849. 



John Upstone 

MANUFACTURER OF FIRE-PROOF 

Doors and Sh utte rs, 

Bank Va ults, Balconies, Gratings, Prison Cells, 
Awnings, Stairs, Iron Fence, etc., 

Corner of California aud Drumm Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

Constantly on hand a large assortment of second 
hand Fire Proof Doors and Shutters. 



1. 



II. SMALL, 



Machine S li o p , 

BUILDER OF 

Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, 
Also, I H. Small's Patent Boot Screwing Machine. 
Gears of all kino's Cut at Short Notice, 
Aud at Greatly Reduced Prices. 
Repairing of all kinds done with Promptness and Dispatch. 

Corner of Market and Beale Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



J. O. HANSOOM 
a. s. SHIrU. 



™ }HANSCOM & CO 

Etna Iron Works! 



UANSCOM. 



S. E. corner Fremont and Tehama Streets, San Francisco, 
Pructical Machinists and Iron Founders, 
MANUFACTURE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

QUARTZ MILL MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS, SAW- 
MILLS, FLOUR-MILLS, 
Dunbar's Improved Self- Adjusting 
MIS TON PACK J NO, 
Now so extensively used in the East and in this State 
Requires no springs or screws; ts always steam-tight j 
ttilhoul excessive Iriclion, and never gets slack or leaky 

HA.NSC0MS CRUSHER, 

The best of the kind now In use In this Slate or anvwhere 
else. All kinds of (iRINDERS and AMALGAMAT iR- 
made to order. Manufacturers of the new Prospecting 
Quartz-Mills, consisting ot Boiler, Engine, 2-stamp But- 
tery and Grinding and Amalgamating Pan, complete, for 
working from one ton per day upwards. Drawings are 
furnished with each of these mills, eo that any competent 
engineer can set it up iu ruuuing order iu two days' time. 

TYLER'S IMPROVED WATER-WHEEL, 
Giving greater power at lower cost than any wheel in use. 

Send for one of our circulars giving lull tables. 

All Wheels warrautcd to give the Power as set forth, or 
the money will be refunded. 

SOLE MAKERS FOR THIS COAST OF THE " PENDER 
GAST WHITE IRON STAMP :-HOES AND DIES " 
None genuine unless obtained from us. Every one war- 
ranted. 

Patented Machinery of all kinds will be furnished by us 
at market prices. Particular atteution given tu drawings 
and specifications ol machinery, wmcn will he made to 
order. The patronage of the public is respectfullv solicited. 

Particular attention paid to HOUSE WORK and 
ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS, 



rpHE CALIFORNIAVS 
SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
J. D. Arthur & Co., comer ol California and Davis. 

ARCHITECTS. 
Townsend k Wyneken, 405 California. 

AUCTIONEERS. 
Cobb & Sinlou, 407 California street. 

BALL AND RACKET COURT. 
Thomas Kelly , 840 Howard street. 

BILLIARD SALOONS. 
A. B. Brown, 328 Montgomery street. 

BOWLING ALLEYS. 
Wholers A: Steil,Piue aud Montgomery, 1 1. Huusa. 

BOOKS. 

E. F. Arnold. 538 Market street near Montgomery. 
A Rouiau s Co., 417 aud 419 Montgomery street. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 
Wentwortb, Hobart & Co. (wholesale nianufac.) 210 Pine 

CARPET8. 

P. F. Loughran & Co., 407 Sausome street. 

CLOTHING. 
H M Lockwood k Co.. 624 Clay street. 
J. R. Mead k Co., corner Montgomory and Bush streets 
William Sherman, 412 Sansome. corner Commercial. 
Quiucy Hall, 645 , 547, aud 549 Washington street. 

COAL OIL, LAMPS, ETC. 

Dell.C'rannafc Co. (wholesale) 513 Front street. 
A. C. Dietz & Co., (wholesale,) 621 Front street. 

DENTISTS. 
Dr. Blake, removed to 645 tilay street- 
Dr. Wm. B McAllister, removed 18 Third street. 
K. T. Wmtcomb, 205 Third, uear Howurd. 

DANCING ACADEMY. 
Coghill's, Congress Hull, Bush, above Moulgomery. 
Fuller a. McCarthy, 727 Market, near Third. 

DRY GOODS. 
Meagher , Taaffe 4: Co. . 9 Montgomery street. 
Mosgrove k Blakely, 222 Third, near Howard. 

' Buyer k Reich, S W corner Jackson aud Stockton. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Waters k Dillon. (Billiard Saloon,) 314 Montgomery st 

G. G. Burnett, (Apothecary,) 330 Montgomery. 
Shepardson & Gales, (successors to R. Hall ft Co. ,) cor- 
ner Sansome and Commercial. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 
Pacilic Business College, 751 Market street .above Third 
Prof. Williams' Commercial Academy, 869 Mission si. 

FURNITURE. 
Goodwin k Co , 510 and 628 Washington streets. 
N P C ie i C". . 21 Sutter and 624 Market streets. 

GROCERS. 

Slosson i: Ladd, southwest corner Folsnm aud First. 
Haskell k Co. , Market and gutlersta, below tbe Marke 
W. M. Noble tS Co., cor Howard aud Twelfth streets 

HATTER. 

Laniolt (wholesale and retail) 227 Moulgotuury stieel 

HAY AND GRAIN. 
J. B. Holmes .v Co.. 110 Market street. 

HOTELS. 

Brooklvn. Johu Kelly , Jr. .Sansome. corner Pine. 
Chicago, E. W. Hcirnburg & Co. , 220 Pacific street. 
John Steinmann, 323 Pine. 

INSURANCE. 

Accidental and Casually, R. L. \ F Ogden, Montgom 

ery street, corner California. 
Breoklyu Lite, s T King. Ageul, S E cor Mootg'y it Pino 
Equitable Life, R. L. k F. Ogdcn, Montgomery, comer 

California. 

Manhattan, R B. Swain k Co. . Ag ts, 206 Front, cor Cal 
Firemens Fund Ins. Co., S.E. cor. Mootg'y and Pine 

Occidental Ins Co. ,S.W. cor. Moutgom'y aud California 
Pacific Ins. Co. ,436 California street. 

LADIES* BIJOUTERIE, CLOAKS, ETC. 
Rosenblatt's, 123 aud 125 Montgomery street. 

LTVERT AND SALE STABLE. 
Philip Morshead, removed to Howard, uear Fifth. 
White k Yuung, 211 Pine street. 

LUMBER. 

Armstrong, Sheldon & Co., coruer Mission and ^pear 

streets. 

MILITARY GOODS AND REGALIA. 
T. Rodgcrs Johnson, Odd Fellow's Hall, 326 Moutg'ry at. 
NOTARY PUBLIC, 

H. S. Tibbey, C04, Montgomery street. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERIES. 
New York, B. F. How land proprietor, - j6 Third stroet, 
below Market. 

PIANOS, MUSIC, ETC. 
M. Gray, 613 Clay street. 

W. S. Pierce, removed (o 534 Market, opposite ?ecoud 
C. Weiderhold & Co., 686 Market near Third. 

PHOTOGRAPHS. CUTLERY, SPECTACLES, ETC. 
Lawrence & Houseworth, 317 and 319 Mouiguineiy si 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS. 
Daly ft Hawkins. 220 Montgomery street. 
Dam A: Sutherland, 320 Montgomery. 
Geo. W. Chapiu, 338 Montgomery. 
John Pforr, 328 Montgomery. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Bivalve. Koltlng & Spreen, 640 Market, near Kearny. 
Ladies' Refreshment Saloon, Swain k Browo, 636 Market 

Magnolia, 143 Third street. 

Market, by Felix and Gustave Besson. 520 Merchant. 
Helvetia, Johujury & Bros. . 5^4 Merchant street 
Saw 'unn's, 506 Montgomery street. 

SALOONS. 

Russell .1: Holding's Exchange, 622 Market street. 
Charter Oak, Frank Kelly, N E. cor Third and Howard 
Razzetti k Co.'s. 527 Washington, above the Market. 
Jones' Sample Rooms, SkE. cor Montgomery and Cal. 
V. Squarza. 44 Lcidesdorff street. 
Coaies k Hendcrsou,37 Suiter street. 

. SCALES. , 
Fairbanks k Hutchinson, Depot for Fairbanks' 
120 Cuhfoniia street. ■ J _) \ 
SEWING MACHINES. 
Grocer k Baker, R. G Brown , 116 Montgomery. 
The Florence, ofllce 111 Montgomery street. 
Wheeler k Wilson, corner Montgomery aud Saorameutg 

STOVES AND TIN WARE. 
A. Swigcrt, coruer Fifth and Folsorn. 

TOYS, ETC. 
Feldbush k Co . 20< Montgomery street 
A. Kohler, 020 Washington street. 

WATER-CURE INSTITUTE. 
Dr Bourne's Pioneer, 10 Post, uear Montgomery, 

WOODAND COAL YARD. 
Flynn k O'Grady, 860 Howard street 



.' Scale. 



The California!!. 



MARGUERITE. 

Pale golden hair, 
Waving as the billowy sea, 
Wreathing, like the ivy free, 

Her brow so fair. 

Deep, thoughtful eyes, 
Seeming, through their lashes bright, 
Jewels set in golden light, 

Dropped from the skies. 

A voice so clear — 
Like the tinkling of vesper bells 
Coming soft through mosey dells, 

Gladdening the ear. 

A smile most sweet — 
Beaming like the sun's bright ray 
Stealing through soipe cloister gray, 

Has Marguerite. 

The Recent Earthquake in Smyrna and^ 
Mytilene.— A letter from Mytilene, the an- 
cient island of Lesbos says : — " On Wednesday, 
the 6th, the weather was dull and the heat dis- 
agreeable, as it is nearly always when the wind 
blows from the south.but no presentiments 
were felt of the sad events which were to fol- 
low. Although the heat was of a sufficiently 
pronounced volcanic character, it was attri- 
buted to the return of the spring. In the 
memory of man no earthquake had been felt 
on the island. At 6 o'clock on the morning 
of the 8th, a sevqre shock, lasting between fif- 
teen and eighteen moments, rocked the town, 
and after a short iuterval, another followed, 
much longer and more violent. At this mo- 
ment I arrived at the office of the Austrian 
Lloyd's, and a minute or two after the shock, 1 
saw the sea inside the harbor heave and foam 
as if a submarine explosion was about to take 
place. My astonishment did not however, last 
very long, for in less time than it takes me to 
tell the fact, I saw all the surrounding buildings 
moving as if they were drunken men, and the 
solid blocks of masonry, of which the piers are 
constructed, tumbling like card-houses The 
office of the Austrian Lloyd's, and nearly a 
the buildings which belong to the Custom 
House, the lighthouse, and the large oil-mill 
also giving way. In all the streets houses fell 
burying their inhabitants beneath their ruins 
The ancient and beautiful castle, the cathe- 
dral, the goveuor's palace, the prisons, the 
mosques, and, I believe, all the consular resi- 
dences, are more or less injured, and for the 
most part aro no better than a mass of ruius. 
The very solidiiy and strength with which 
the houses in the town were constructed ren- 
dered more serious the effects of this great 
calamity, and have multiplied a hundred-fold 
the number of persons who had perished or 
have lost their property. That part of the 
town which was lowest has suffered most. 
The earth literally opened and engulfed a num- 
ber of buildings forming a street which led from 
the seashore to the iuterior of the town ; and 
that which was still on Wednesday afternoon 
the most frequented part of Mytilene is now 
actually invaded by the sea, and covered by 
heaps of mud. In one word, more than one- 
half of our beautiful town; the most delightful 
and gayest in the whole Levant is nothing 
more than a desert heaped with ruins. What 
is still sadder to record is the number of deaths. 
It is calculated that from 800 to 1,000 persons 
have been killed, and a still more considerable 
number wouuded and disabled Up to this day 
120 bodies have been recovered from ruins to 
which access is safe ; but how many others are 
buried in the mass of debris which it would be 
dangerous to attempt to remove! The houses 
which are still standing are nearly all deserted, 
and the surviving population scattered 
through the hills and gardens in the vicinity 
of the town. The town of Mytilene is not the 
only sufferer by this calamity, it has made 
ruins and victims in the northern part of the 
island. It is douthful whether a single village 
has been saved. Not only has property suf- 
fered, but almost everywhere there are num- 
bers of dead and dying." 



M. KELLER, 

PROPRIETOR OF THE 
RISING SUN AND LOS ANGELES VINEYARDS. 

DEPOT FOR THE SALE OF HIS 
NATIVE WINES AND BRANDIES, 

Wine and Brandy Bitters, 
BASEMENT OP MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 
Comer of Battery and Washington Streets, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



G. GROEZINGER, 

DEALER IN 

.Native California 

RED AND WHITE WINES, 
Brandies, Port, Sherry, Angelica, Etc., 

N. W. CORNER OF BATTERY AND PINE STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



WINE SALOON. 
Union Saloon. — C. H. Cordesis the proprietor of 
the Union Saloon, Market street, a few doors south 
of Fremont, where is to be found the choicest wines 
and liquors. Mr. Cordes prides himself on his Ken- 
tucky Whisky, which is very old and oily. The 
"Davis" brand whisky drinkers should by all means 
call and test this whisky. Hot lunch is set on the 
table from 10 till 2. ■ 



California Wines. 

Vintage 1862. 

THE UNDERSIGNED OFERS FOR SALE SOME 
very choice Wines, of the above named vintage. 
That connoisseurs, all interested in the development of 
this magnificent resource of our State, and the public 
generally, may be convinced that California is able to pro- 
duce as "good Wine (when properly treated and of suffi- 
cient age) as other parts of the Wine producing regions 
of the globe, attention is respectfully called to these 
Wines, by A. S. LOWNDES, Wine Merchant, 

311 Battery Street, S. F. 



JtfATURE UNVEILED, 

AT THE 

PACIFIC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY AND SCIENCE 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 
Bctweeu lifornia and Pine 



4 '0 UR OPERA." 

CAPT. JOHN H. MAY, 
615 WASHINGTON STREET, 615, 

SAN FRANCISCO, 
Opposite Maguire's Opera House. 

JOHN TAYLOR, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 

NO. 16 THIRD STREET, 
Between Market and Stevenson Stree^j., San Francisco. 




THE BEST FAMILY WINES 
I1V THE CITY 

— Arc to be fouutl at — 

HOADLEY & CO.'S, 

533 Merchant street, undor 
Pacific Fruit Market. 

tS" Call and try our Sonoma Champaguc, Vega del Rio, 
Sonoma Port. Red and White Wines, Wine and Brandy 
Bitters, and all the varieties usually found in a California 
Wine Cellar. 



DUNBAR'S EXCHANGE, 
No. 223 Bush Street, 
Bet. the Occidental and Cosmopolitan Hotels. 

a®- HARRY RIKER would be pleased to see his 
old friends at any hour of the day. 

Hot Lunch every day from 11 A. M. till 2 p. m. 

J. W. DUNBAR, Proprietor. 



FAUST CELLAR, 
Beer and Wine Saloon, 

Southeast corner of Clay anil Montgomery streets, 

ftan Francisco. 
A. L. THIELE, Proprietor 

ALWAYS ON HAND, Wholesale and Retail, West- 
phalia Hams, Russian CAVIAR, Sardines. Anrho 
vies, Swiss and I.imburg Cheese, and other European 
Delicacies. The finest brands of Liquors, Wines arid 

Cigars ; Seltzer Water. 

FISHING AND HUNTING PARTIES fitted out at the 
shortest notice. 



J^|ART1N GROSTETTA, 

LATE OF VIRGINIA CITY, 

Would respectfully Inform his rriends and the public Hi a 
he has put chased the WELL-KNOWN SALOON previous- 
ly occupied by THOS. DOYLE, 535 SACRAMENTO ST, 
above the What Cheer House. The best kind of Wines, 
Liquors and Cigars always on hand. Passengers' Stores 
carefully put up to .order. 



yyONDERS OF WONDERS ! 

TO BB SEEN ONXY AT THE 

.^acific Museum of Anatomy and Science, 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 

between Caii r mi* a i ! Pine. 



1- 



J CUTBERLET, 

CUSTOM 
BOOT AND SHOE STORE, 

FRENCH SCREWED BOOTS AND SHOES, 
No. 546 Washington Street, near Montgomery Street. 



The Finest quality of CUSTOM WORK neatly executed. 
Always on hand other fine work ready made. 



T 



HE CELEBRATED PIANOS 




J. B. DUNHAM, F. C. LIGHTE & CO., 
AND ERNEST GABLER, • 

Are warranted for FIVE YEARS, and indorsed by tlie 
LEADING PIANISTS of AMERICA as SUPERIOR IN- 
STRUMENTS. 

Sole Agents— C WIEDERHOLD & CO., 

685 Market street, near Third. 



G 



REAT TRIUMPH ! 




STEINWAY & SONS 

Were awarded the FIRST PRIZE 
MEDAL at the late great _ 
INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION AT LONDON, over the 
wo hundred and sixty-nine Pianos entered for competition 
from all parts of the world. 

The Special Correspondent of the New York TVntwsayi : 

" Messrs. Steinway & Sous' indorsement by the Jurors 
Is emphatic, and stronger and more to the point than that 
of any European maker." 

A constant supply of the above superior instruments can 
be found at the Agent's, 

M. GRAY, 613 Clay street. 
PIANO TUNING done by a first-class Workman, from 
Steinway & Sou's Factory, New York. 



CALIFORNIA BRASS FOUNDRY, 

Ne. 125 First street, opposite Minna, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

All kinds of Brass, 
Composition, Zinc, 
and Babbitt Meta 
Castings, furnished 
at the shortest notice. 
Brass Ship- Work oj 
all kinds, Spikes, 

Sheathing Nails. Rudder Braces, Hinges, etc., constantly 
oil hand and made to order. Also, manufacture Ship and 
Steamboat Bells and Gongs o r superior tone. 

All kinds of Steam, Liquor, Water, Oil, and Flange 
Cocks and Valves made aud repaired. 

Hydraulic Pipes and Nozzles, and Hose Couplings and 
Connections of allsizesaud patterns, furnished with dis- 
patch. PRICES MODERATE. 

V. KINGWELL. JOS. H. WEED. SAM'L WHITE. 




££ROOKLYN HOTEL, 

1852. SAN FRANCISCO. 1866. 

The Proprietor of the above-named Hotel wislies 
to inform his patrons anil the Travelling Public that he 
has opened that elegant Brick Fireproof Hotel, on the 

S. E. Corner of Pine and Sansome streets, 

With all the modem conveniences attached to it. 

Gas and water are supplied throughout the House. The 
Rooms arc well veutilated, and the Public will find in this 
Hotel all the comforts of a home. The Hotel is spacious 
and well adapted for the use of Families. Suits of Rooms 
can be had on reasonable terms. 

A Large Reading Room is attached to the Hotel, 

Containing 500 Volumes of Standard Works 

Which is entirely for the use of patrons. 
THE CITY COACH, with the name of the Hotel on it, 
will be in readiness at the Wharf, on the arrival of each 
steamer, to convey passengers and baggage to the Hofel, 
free of charge. JOHN KELLY. Jr., Proprietor, 



rpHE CALIFORNIA 

Building and Savings Bank, 

CALIFORNIA ST., ONE DOOR FROM SANSOME. 
Capital and Deposits, ----- $600,000 

WHICH IS LOANED ON PROPERTY. 

LOANS MADE on CITY REAL ESTATE, 
HOUSES, SHIPS, FACTORIES 
AND MERC HAND I SI'. 

Deposits received at one per rent, per month. 

M"ney trnnsiniitefl from the interior, by KxpresF or 
Mail, passed to interest from tin' day ol' arrival, and a 
Certificate returned in course of po.>t. 

Strangers may deposit Bonds, Gold Dust, Coin . or Valu- 
able Papers in the Vault, for Urn* or short periods, at a 
small rert, for which valuables the Compi>n' tT will be 
accountable, THOMAS MOOXEY, President. 



JOHN HAGAN, 

^ Marble - Worker, 

MARKET ST , OPPOSITE LINCOLN SCHOOL 
HOUSE, between Fifth and Sixth. 

Marble Maitels, Grates, Monuments, Head-jii>i 
stones, Cemetery Copings, and all kinds of j 
Marble Work executed on most reasonable) 
terms. Particular attention paid to the placingL^ 
of Tombstones at Lone Mountain or CalvaryE35_ 
Cemeteries. N. B.— Country orders promptly attended to. 





MACCARONUYERMlCELLr, 

(C706 ^omeTst. 7067) 




J R. MEAD & CO., 

Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FINE C LO THING, 
Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

TRUNKS, VALISES, CARPET BAGS, ETC., 
,200 k 202 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
Corner of Bush, 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Asphaltum Roofing. 

PAVEMENTS, ROOFING, 
CELLAR FLOORS, WATER HOUSES, 

And all kinds of 

Asphaltum Work, 

Done at shortest notice, anil at moderate price?, by 
M. BONNET, 
OIBcc — Express Building (upstaiis), 
N. E. cor. Montgomery'and California sts., San Franci = co 



AT THE RE G II L A R 

C. E. COLLINS & CO., 

603 MONTGOMERY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 
Nos. 43 and 44 Nassau Street, 

NEW YORK. 
Dealers in\ American, Swiss and English 
WATCHES, 
JEWELRY AND ATERIALS 

flSr'We have made arrangements to buy AMERI- 
CAN WATCHES in large quantities from the Fac- 
tory, and will receive a discount on the regnlai 
Wholesale Prices. We will hereafter 

Retail the American Watches 

AT 

The Regular Wholesale Prices. 

Our only profit being the small 
ay buying in 




large quantities. 



JJOWE'S NEW STYLE 

FAMILY SEWING MACHINES. 
GREAT IMPROVEMENT— JUST RECEIVED. 

ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR FINE WORK. Also, 
Braiding. Hemming, etc. The advantage these Machines 
halve is extreme simplicity, very strong and durable, not 
liable to get out of order— Adapted equally well to all 
grides of work. The Howe should be examined by all 
contemplating purchasing. H. A. DEM1NG, 

13T Kearny street, S. W, cor. Sutter, San Francisco, Cal 



^ P. COLE & CO., 

WHOLESALE 

Furniture Warehouse, 




• No. 314 Pine street, San Francisco. 

LOWEST RATES AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK ON THE 
COAST. 

RETAIL STORE, 

Noe. 524 Market, and 21 Suffer streets— next door to 
the Metropolitan Market. 

E. GOLDSMITH, 

Practical Card and Seal Engraver, 
AND PLATE PRINTER, 
No. 005 Montgomery street, over Tucker's. 



14 



The Calitornian. 



A Remarkable Character in Paris. — 
The Patrie thus speaks of a yuiiDfj woman 
who is exciting curiosity in Paris: 

" She is from five to six and twenty. Her 
complexion is of a warm golden tint, the Flor. 
entine bronze. She is never clad but in a 
black dress, made high, and ending at the neck 
in a row of large coral beads of a blood red, 
and at her wrists with bracelets of the same 
material and hue. From beneath her cap, a 
sort of beret or Scotch bonnet — black also, 
and encircled with a row of coral beads— flow 
long and thick tresses, so black that they are 
blue. She is never seen on foot. Her' Victo- 
ria , is drawn by a hair of ponies black as 
ebony, at a pacs which makes the pavement 
smoke again. The black and red of her cos- 
tume and equipage, added to her bronzed com- 
plexion, invest her with a sinister and some- 
what diabolical air. She is known only by the 
designation cf ' La Dame au Corail.' Those 
who have been curious enough to investigate 
something of her history and habits of life, re- 
port that she is immensely rich, travles with 
six servants — two Indian woman and four men, 
one of whom is a negro, the others being of 
the same bronzed complexiou as their mistress, 
that she spends much of her time playing on 
a species of guzla, or else practising with a sa- 
loon pistol at a target, which target repsents a 
female figure of blonde complexion, about the 
size of the largest dolls ; lastly, she is from Java, 
and lives exclusively on fruits aud preserves. 
She is said to have blown out the brains of 
one of her slaves who entered her apartments 
unsummoned. But. the most remarkale cir- 
cumstance about her is that day and night the 
shutters are closed, and her apartment illu- 
minated with candelabras. At night she sings 
plaintive melodies more Jike wailings than set 
tunes, and she smokes opium and sleeps on 
panther skins. She is said to be the widow 
of a great personage in the island of Sumatra, 
who had committed suicide after an outburst 
of jealousy on ber part, caused by his sus- 
pected attachment to the wife of an English 
naval officer." 



T y 1 e r Brothers, 

j jjfMfSfj jL.691 Market si., cor. Third, /f SUfSj j^ 
T^riflniry sax FRANCISCO, QQgf 

Importer, Wholesale an<i Retail Dealers in 
SCHOOL BOOKS, 

. STATIONERY. 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS. 

BLANK BOOKS, 

PORTFOLIOS, 

JUVENILE BOOKS, 

CHILDREN'S PICTURE BOOKS, 

FANCY ARTICLES, Ete. 

ESPECUL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

LADIES' STATIONERY, 

Which we Stamp with Initials 
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE. 

WEDDIXG AND~VISITING CARDS 
Engraved, Written or Printed. 

Editor of the Caltfornlan— Sir : Permit 

me to report to tbe public, through your columns, the 
business operations of the BUILDERS' INSURANCE 
COMPANY, for May: 

Number of policies issued 1,070 

Average amount insured under each policy... $ 862 69 

Average rate per cent ■ 2 11 

Net amount of premiums received 19,479 82 

Losses for the month 4.726 13 

Balance in favor of Company $14,753 69 

All of which, I trust, will be deemed satisfactory. 

THOMAS MOONEY, 
President Builders' Insurance Company. 
San Francisco, June 1, 1867. 



CENTRAL FAY CLUB. 



T 



HE ROOMS OF THE CENTRAL, FAY 



C!nb, No. 1, 5 and 6, southeast corner of Pine and 
Montgomery streets. Special meeting every TUESDAY 
EVENING. Rooms open every evening for general 
co nsultation. 

HEALY'S CURATIVE OIL, 

For Hh Extermination of Pain, is a Sovereign Remedy 
for Rheumatism, Headache, Toothache, Sore Throat, 
Cramps in the Limbs, Diarrhoea, Sprains, Bruises, Buns 
and Cuts, an l for the Bites of Poisonous Insects, Frozen 
Feet, etc. , stands unrivalled. 

Fur Sale by all dealers in medicines. Price One Dolla 
per bottle. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1851. 

Lawrence & Houseworth, 




317 AND 319 MONTGOMERY STREET, 



THE LARGEST OPTICAL INSTRUMENT Es- 
tablishment on the Pacific Coast. Import all 
their own goods direct from European and Amer- 
ican manufacturers, aud have a larger aud more 
complete assortment than all other dealers com- 
bined 

SPECTACLES and EYE-GLASSES warranted to 
suit the sight in every particular. 

Double sign ted Spectacles, Tinted Spectacles 
and Brazilian Pebble spectacles of the mo.-.t ap 
proved form . 

Those who have been disappointed at other es- 
tablishments will certainly be pleased with the 
Spectacles they purchase from us. 



O 
P 
T 
I 
C 
I 

A 
N 
S 



N. B- — Inferior Glasses are not sold 
by its to the unwary for Brazilian 
Pebbles. 

LAWRENCE & HOUSEWCRTH, 

OPTICIANS, 
317 and 319 Montgomery Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Complete Catalogues of Optical Iustruments tvoithed free. 



Beauty! 

Auburn, Golden, Flaxen and Silken Curls, 

PRODUCED BY THE USE OF PROF DE BREUX 
FR1SER LE CHEVETJX. 
One application warranted to curl the most straight 
and Btubborn hair of either sex into wavy ringlets, or 
heavy massive curls. Has been used by the fashion- 
ables of Paris and London, with the most gratifying 
results. Does no injury to the hair. Price by mail, 
sealed and post paid, $1: Descriptive circulars mailed 
Iree. Address 

BERGER. SHUTTS & CO:, Chemists, 

No. 285 River street. Troy, N. Y. , 
Sole Agents for the United States: 



D. 



GH1RARDELLI k COS 



Italian M a nuf act ury, 

416 and 417 JACKSON ST. , SAN FRANCISCO. 
Manufacturers and Dealers in 

PLAIN. SWEET, CINNAMON AND 

VANII-LA CHOCOLATES. 
PREPARED COCOA, COCOA PASTE, 

CRACKED COCOA, COCOA SHELLS, etc., etc. 
PURE GROUND OLD JAVA COFFEE AND 

COSTA RICA COFFEE. 

CHARTRES AND RIO COFFEE; 

GREEN COFFEE OF EVERY QUALITY.' 
CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS: 
N: B — GhirardelM's Chocolate is manufactnre<l by 
steam from Cocoa of the finest quality, imported direct. 
In excellence and delicacy of flavor, it is sujieriur to any 
imported Chocolate: 



rpHE SIGN OF THE BIG GLOVE. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE, 
25 Post street, between Montgomery aud Kearny streets. 

J. F. SNOW, THE "GLOVE MAN," CLEANS 
Furs without removing the lining. All kinds ofA||| 

Dresses including Stage and Party Dresses — i 

WITHOUT RIPPING. Woolen Goods, Shawls, Buck 
and Kid Gloves, Buck Undervests, Feathers, etc., etc 
dyes Kid Gloves and Feathers. 

RING'S VEGETABLE AMBROSIA FOR THE HAIR FOR 
SALE. 



H. 



Peet & Son, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

SADDLERY AND HARNESS 
No. 315 BATTERY STREET, 
Hex Door to Commercial Street, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



J^ATHANIEL GRAY k CO., 
UNDERTAKERS, 
CITY ■ AND COUNTY SEJTTON, 
641 Sachimento street, Corner or Webb 

S)le agents tor BARSTOW'S PATENT METALLIC 
BURIAL CASES and CASKETS. 



J>MILADELPHIA BREWERY, 

Jorner S<i;:>;iJ »ad Fcaorrj streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

HOELSCHER & WIELAND, 

Proprietors- 




J_£OAGLAND & NEWSOM, 
ARCHITECTS, 

Southwest comer Sacramento and Kearny street*, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



WILLI-* JAMES, 

Newark, N. J. 



DAVID KREint, 
J. COBBLBP1CK, 



San Francisco. 



j^JEEKER, JAMES * CO., 

Importers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Wagon & Carriage Materials, 

NOS. 12 AND 14 PINE STREET 

The Largest Establishment on the Pacific Coast for the 
supply of materials for 

WAGONS, TRUCKS, 
CARTS, OMNIBUSSES, 
CARRIAGES, COACHES, 

EXPRESS WAGONS, 
BUGGIES, SULKIES, Eic. 
Also, Importers of 

GREGG 'S TENONING MACHINES, 

Hub Bonn" Machines, Thimble Skein* for Wood 
Axle*, Hub Bands, Axle Clips Shaft Shackles, 
Malleable Iron Castings, Concord Axles and 
Springs. 

JEy Orders trom the country solicited and promptly 
attended to. MEEKER. JAMES ■• Co. 




REMOVAL. REMOVAL. 

Larkins & Co., 



Manufaclurers of every description of 

C A R R 1_A G E S . 

CONCORD WAGONS, Ranch Wagons and Buggies 
made to order. £9.A1I kinds of Jobbing and Carriage 
Painting done at the shortest notice. 

New Manufactory Nos. 631 and 633 How ard street, 
corner of Hubbard, between second aud Third, 
San Francisco. 



F0LS0M 




Carriage Manufacturer, 

Noi 531 California strf.et, 
Between Montgomery and ivearny streets, San Francisco. 

EVERY DESCRIPTION OF CARRIAGES. EXPRESS 
Wagons, Buggies, etc , made to order, of the best 
materials and workmanship. 

Repairing and- General Blacksmith ing done with prompt- 
ness, and at prices to suit the times. 



s 



AUL k McARRON, 

Manufacturers of 



STAGE AND THOROCOHBRACE WAGONS, 

NO. 579 ivn 581 MARKET STREET, 

Near Second Street, San Francisco. 

Makes to order all kinds of Carrlnge aDd Buggy Work, 
Express and Tliomiighbrace Wagons and Stage W*.»rk. 

A general assortment of new nnd second hand Wagons 
on hand. Jobbing done with neatness and dispatch- 



Pollard & Carvill, 

Dealers in and Manufacturers of 

LIGHT CARRIAGES 

ami BUGGIES, 

37 and 39 Webb street, 
Between SAcramento and California. 

Also, Repairing, Blacksmilhinir. Painting and Trim 
nunc done with neatness and dispatcn. 




CORNS! 
DR. V. POPPER, 

Surgeon 6'hiropedist 

No 20 Montgomery street, between Post and Sutter, 
San Fraucisro. Office hours from 9 a . u to 6 p. M. 

Offers his services to the public as an Operator on such 
excrescences us hard and soft corns, enlarged joints, club 
nails, buoions, nails penetrating the Mesh, warts, etc. 



Whiskers and Mustaches ! 



FORCED TO GROW UPON THE SMOOTHEST FACE 
face in from three to five weeks by usin^ Dr. 
SEVIGNE'S RESTAURATEUR CAPILLAIRE, the most 
wonderful discovery in modern science, upon the Beard 
and Hair in an almost miraculous manner. It has been 
used by the elite of Paris and London with most flat- 
tering success. Names of all purchasers will bo regis 
tered, and if entire sati<faction is not given in every 
instance, the money will be cheerfully refunded. Price 
by mail, sealed and post paid, $1. Descriptive circulars 
and testimonials mailed free. Address 

BERGER, SHUTTS 4 CO., Chemists, 

No. 285 River street, Troy, N. Y. , 
Sole Agents for the United States. 

T^ATUBE UNVEILED, 

AT THE 

PACIFIC MUSEUM OF ANATOMY AND SCIENCE 
Eureka Theatre, Montgomery street, 
Between lifornla and Pine 



piRE AND MARINE INSURANCE. 

UNION INSURANCE COMPANY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Nos. 416 and 418 California Street. 

INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY. 

Cash Capital, .... $750,000 

The California Lloyds, 

HAVING CONSOLIDATED WITH THE UNION INSUR- 
ANCE COMPANY, JANUARY 1, 1806, THIS COMPaNY 
ARE NOW PREPARED TO EFFECT MARINE AS WELL 
AS FIRE INSURANCE UPON THE MOST FAVORABLE 
TERMS. 

LOSSES PROMPTLY AND EQUITABLY ADJUSTED 
AND PAID IN GOLD COIN 



Directors. 
J. Mora Moss, Benjamin Brewster, 

James Otis, Llovd Tevis, 

Wm. E. Barron, Thoe. H. Selby, 

J. G. Kittle, Nicholas Lnning, 

Joseph A. Donohoe, John Parrott, 
M. J. O'Connor, J. Underbill, 

I. Friedlander, M. D. Sweeny, 

Moses Heller, C. N. Felton, 

Lafayette Maynard, James Phelan, 
Charles L. Low, Gustave Toucbard, 

Jacob Scbolle, Michael Castle, 

James Uows, Nicholas Larco, 

Joseph Seller, N. G Kittle, 

L. H. Allen, Wm. C. Talbot, 

W'm. Hooper, Patrick McAran, 

C Temple Emmet. Geo. C. Johnson, 

Joseph Brandenstein, Caleb T. Fay, 

B. F. Hastings. Sacramento. " 
L. Cunniogham, William Smith, 

MarvsTflle. 

CALEB T. FAY, Presideut. 
CHARLES D. HAVEN. Secretary. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHAKI), Marine Director. 



QCCIDENTAL 

Iii surancr Co m pa n ij , 

Southwest corner Montgomery and California street'. 

INDIVIDUAL LIABILITY. 
Capital Stock, - - - $300,000 

LOSSES PAID IN UNITED STATES GOLD COIN. 

THIS COMPANY will insure against loss by Fire on any 
Dwelling House, Buildings. Merchanlse or other proper 
tv. sit iate'l in the -tat- of t alifomia. The largest sum 
tiiey will take on any one risk is thirty thousand dollar*. 

C. CHRISTIANSEN, Pre st 
1. GREENEBAUM, Vice President 
B RoTn?nrn.n, Secretary. 



JMTANHATTAN INSURANCE CO. 

OF NEW YORK 

INCORPORATED 1821. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 31,250,000 

Insurance effected against both 

Fire and Marine Risks. 

AT THE LOWEST RATES. 

Losses promptly adjusted, aDd paid in United 
States Gold Coin. 

B. B. SWAIN & CO., Agents, 
206 Front street. San Francisco. 



Ayer's S a r s a p a r i 1 1 a 

TO 

Puri fy the Blood. 

NOT A FEW OF THE WORST DISORDERS THAT 
afflict mankind arise from tbe corruption that accu- 
mulates in the blood. Of all the discoveries that ham 
been made to purge it out, none have been found which 
could equal in effect Ayvk - CoMporxn Extract or 
Sarsaparilla. It cleanses and reuovaU n the blood, in 
Mills the vigor «f health into the system and purges out 
the humors which make disease. It stimulates the 
healthy functions of the body, ■ .1 expels the disorders 
that grow and rankle n tbe blood. I' - e xtr aordinary 
virtues are not yet widely known, but, when they are, it 
will no longer be a question what remedy to employ in 
the great variety of afflicting diseases that require ac 
alterative remedy. Such a remedy, that could be relied 
on, has long been sought for, and now, for the first time, 
the public hare one on which they can dep~Dd. Our 
space here does not admit rert incites to show its effect a 
But the trial of a single bottle will show to the tick that 
it has virtues surpassing anything they have ever taken. 
Sufferers from Scrofula, Scrofulous Swellings and Sort*, 
try It and see the rapidity with which it cjres. Skin 
Diseases, Pimples Pustules. Blotches, Eruptions, efc « re 
soon cleaned out of the system. 

St. Anthony's Fire, Rose or Erysipelas. Tetter or Salt 
Rheum. Scald Haad, Ringworm, etc.. should n- t be borne 
while they can be so speedily cured by Arm's SiBaara- 

RII-LA. 

Syphilis or Venereal Disease is expelled from the sys- 
tem by the prolonged use of this Sarkapaj.ii, and tbe 
patient is left as healthy as if he never bad the disease. 

Female Diseases are caused by Srroflila in the blood, 
and are generally soon cured by this Extract of Sabaa- 
p a rill*. Price f 1 per bottle, or fi bottles lor $&. 

For all the purposes of a family physic, take Aran's 
Cathartic Piixs. which are everywhere known to be tbe 
best purgative that is offered to tbe American People. 

prepared by Da. J. C. Atfr k Co., Lowll, Mate., and 
sold by all Druggists and dealers in medicine everywhere. 

CRANE & BR1GHA11, Son Francisco, 
Wholesale Agente. 



DEXTER STABLES. 
Bash Street, between Occidental and 
Cosmopolitan Hotels, San Francisco. 

W. Q. JONES PRonuBToa 



The Californian. 



15 



Powell Street 

WARM SWIMMING BATHS! 
N. E. Corner Powell and Filbert Streets, 
OPPOSITE WASHINGTON SQUARE. 
J. M. NASH PROPRIETOK. 

WARM AND COLD BATHS from 6 A. «t to » p. m. 
daily, w'th every appliance usually connected 
with a well-ordered Gymnasium Tor the development 
of Health and Muscle. 

The only Complete Swimming Bath on 
this Coast, 

Another advantage connected with this establishment, 
not usually found in Swimming Baths, is, that the 
water is Continually Changing, Fresh Water running in 
and out Constantly. 

Single Baths, including Towels and Bathing Dress . 35 cts 
5 Bath Tickets, " " $1 

Call and Try Them. The Kearny Street and Mont- 
gomery Street Cars pass the door every five minutes. 

Tbe Baths are reserved for Ladies every Tuesday, 
from 6 a. m. to 9 r. M. Ladies to supply their own 
Bathing Dresses. 

1 will guarantee to impart a thorough practical knowl- 
edge of Swimming in one month: Terms I or the Course, $10. 

J. M. NASH. 



JACOB SHEW, 

Pioneer Photographer 

613 CLAY STREET, 
North side, four doors above Montgomery. 
Takes all kinds of Photographs in the very best style 
of the Art. Would especially invite attention to tho supe- 
riority ol the " Cabinet Photograph," or new size, taken 
at this establishment. 



pHOTOGRAPHY 

J N ALL ITS BRANCHES 
Executed in a Superior Stylo, at 

GEO. D . MORSE'S 
NEW AND ELEGANT ROOMS, 
No. 315 Montgomery Street, corner of Summer, 

Photographs retouched in India Ink or Water Color.-, 
and copied from daguerreotypes or ambroty pes loany size. 
All work guaranteed and perfect satisfaction giveu. Call 
and see specimens before going elsewhere. 



C. E. KLEPZJU, 

MANUFACTURER *— *" 
DEALER IN fj| 

GUNS, PISTOLS, 

SportiDg Apparatus, 
AMMUNITION 

AND GUN MATERIALS, 

No. 733 Washington Street, Son Francisco. 
Gilding and Silver Plating of all Kinds of metals ; also, 
Silver or Plated Ware reburnished. 




JJQLBROOK, MERRILL & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

STOVES, TIN-PLATE, 

SHEET IRON, LEAD PIPE, PUMPS, ZINC, WIRE, AND 

HOUSE FURNISHING HARDWARE. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
TIN, SHEET IRON AND COPPER WARE. 

Nos. 13 and 15 Front street San Francisco 

Noe. 176 and 178 J street : Sacramento 

Mam street Austin, Nevada 



R R I V A L 

—OF— 

MADAME LAURUSTINUS, 

The Great Prophetess and Doctress. 
The Madame has astonished thousands of her visitors in 
Europe, England aud America, by revealing the Past, 
Present and Future EvT-nts of Lilc, such as Law Suits, 
Travel by Sea or Land, Lost or Stolen Goods, Hidden Treas- 
ure, Absent Friends or Relatives, and all affairs of business 
in general. 

jgr-Tho Madamo has a select assortment of pure Roman 
Talismans, for Love, Good Luck, Success iu Business, aud 
guarautood for Life. 

Otuco of MADAME LAURUSTINUS, No. 816 Montgomery 
street, betwoon Jackson and Pacific. Office hours, from 8 
o'clock in themorning ootil 8 in the evening. 



D 



R. N. T. WHITCOMB, 



No. 



B EN T 1ST, 
205 Third Street, Sau Francisco. 



Teeth filled with line gold, artificial hone and platina. 
All plate work made and repaired, of the best material, 
•t the shortest notice and warranted. None cheaper or 
bettor on the coast Call and examine specimens. 

North Beach and South Park Cars pass the door. 

N. T. WHITCOMB. 



D 



OCTOR DEMAREST'S 



Private Medical Office, 

617 KEARNY STREET, 

Near Commercial, San Francis o. 



omen Houbs : From 9 a. till 4 r. m. 



Newly Opened. 

McKee's 

NEW GROCERY 

AND 

FAMILY FURNISHING 

Store, 

No. 31 KEARNY STREET, 
Third Door South of Post Street, 

NOW RECEIVING ORDERS FOR GROCERIES, PRO- 
visions. Table Luxuries, and all Housekeeping 
articles of the best quality at low prices. 




0 O 

TRY I Tl 

• STANDARD SOAP CO. 'S : 

; WASHING POWDER. : 

: It saves one-half the lime and : 

: labor of ordinary Soaps. Does ; 

; not injure the Clothing. Get a : 

: package aud give it a trial. Soid : 

: by all Grocers. ; 



THEODORE KALLENBERG, 

No. 416 Market street, - - - San Francisco, 

Machinist, 

Maker of Models for Inventors, Draw ing Instruments, 
Small Machines, Philosophical Instruments, Scales and 
Weights, all kinde of Brass and Iron Work- 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



CALIFORNIA 

Steam Navigation Company. 

STEAMER CAPITAL CAPT. E. A. POOLE. 

" CHRYSOPOLIS.CAPT. A. FOSTER. 

YOSEMITE 

CORNELIA.... CAPT. W. BROMLEY. 
JULIA CAPT E. CONCKLIN 

One of the above steamers leave BROADWAY WHARF, 
at 4 o'clock P. M., EVERY DAY, ("Sundays excopted,) for 
Sacramento and one for Stockton , the Sacramento steamer 
connecting with light-draft steamers for Marysville, Co- 
lusa, Chico and Red Bluff 

Steamships PACIFIC, ORIZABA, CALIFORNIA, AC- 
TIVE, and SENA10R, leave as advertised . Tor Portland, 
Oregon, New Westminster, British Columbia, Victoria, 
(V. I.J Santa. Barbara, San Pedro.aud San Diego. 

Offlceof the Company, northeast corner of Front and 
Jackson streets, 

B M. HARTSHORNE. President. 



j^|RS. WINSH1P, 

fashionable Milliner 

NO. 23 POST STREET, 
Between Kearny aud Montgomery, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



All kinds of Lace Work, Head Presses, Breakfast Caps, 
&c., made to order. 

Particular attention paid to men ling and doing up 
Laces. 

tgfc_ Goods receiveil by every steamer, from New York 
and Paris. 





7.M0VAL.— F I R S T PREMIUM 

Billiard 
TABLE 

MANUFACTORY. 

P. LJSENFELD, 

Has removed from 612 Battery street to 537 Sacramento 
street, a few doors below Montgomery, 

Has constantly on hand a large assortment of the best 
BILLIARD TABLES, with all the modern improvements. 
A'so BILLIARD TRIMMINGS Of every description. 
All goods sold are warranted. 



McDOUGALL & MARQUIS, 

Architects, 

328 Montgomery street, San Fraucisco. 

H. M'DOUGAIX. j. MABqUlS. 



Rkfkbs to Messrs. Elam & Howes, Clav street, below 
Battery; Messrs. Hatch & Co., (R. W. Bringou & T. H. 
Hatch.) Washington street below Battery; A. J. Coghill, 
Esq., Front street, corner of Clay; Win, J. Adams, Esq., 
(Adams, Blinn &Co. ,) Piers 17 aud 19, Stewart street; Jo- 
seph Rich, Esq., Bush street below Turnvoreiu Hall; Hon. 
M. S. Latham, London and Sau Francisco Bank; Wm. B. 
Johuston, Esq., Iusurance Building, 412 ami IHMontgom- 
ery street; James Brooks, Esq., Editor "Golden Era." 



£)ANTY & WAGNER, 

(SUCCESSORS TO J. REGAN,) 

113 Montgomery street, bet. Bush and Suiter 

N. B. — All candies sold by us are warranted to he man- 
factured from Stewart's double refined Sugar, and to be 
equal to any manufactured in the state. Count ry mer- 
chants solicited to examine our stock and prises. Goods 
delivered to any part of the city free of charge. 

AMERICAN HOTEL, 
Main street. . - Petaluma. 
EMERSON h LAMBERTON, Proprietors. 



PRO BONO PUBLICO. 

L ACQUITS 

SARSA PARIP HERE 
BITTERS 

POSSESS INVALUABLE PROPERTIES. 
They give Health to the Sick, 

Strength to the Weak, 

Joy to the Afflicted. 
«®» SOLD EVERYWHERE ,=@a 



F 



There cometh glad tidings of joy to all, 

To young and old, to great and to Small ; 

The beauty which w as once so precious and rare, 

Is free lor all, and all may be lair. 

By tbe use of 

CHASTELLAR'S 

WHITE LIQUID ENAMEL, 

OR IMPROVING AND BEAUTIFYING THE COM' 
plexion. 

The most valuable and perfect preparation in use, for 
giving the skin a beautiful pearl-like tint, that is only 
found in youth. It quickly removes Tan, Freckles, 
Pimples, Blotches, Moth Patches, Sallowness, Eruptions, 
aud all impurities of the skin, kindly healing the same, 
leaving the skin white and clear as alaba-ter. Its use 
cannot be detected by the closest crutiny, and being a 
vegetable 1 preparation is perfectly harmless. It is the 
only article, ol the kind used by the French, and is con 
sidered by the Parisian as indispensable to a perfect 
toilet. Upwards of 30,000 bottles were sold during the 
past year, a sullic ent guarantee of its efficacy. Price 
only 75 cents. Sent by mail, post-paid, on receipt ol 
order, by 

BERGER, SHUTTS & CO., Chemists, 

285 River street, Troy, N. Y. 



excelsior ! Lxcelsior ! ! 

CHASTELLAR'S 
HAIR EXERMINATOR, FOR REMOVING 
SUPERFLUOUS HAIR. 

TO THE LADIES ESPECIALLY. THIS INVALUABLE 
depiliatory recommends itself as being an almost 
indispensable article to lemale beauty, is easily applied, 
does not burn or injure tbe skin, but acts directly on 
the roots. It is warranted to remove superfluous hair 
from low foreheads, or Irom any part of the body, 
completely, totally aud radically extirpating the same, 
leaving the skm soft, smooth and natural This is tbe 
only article used by tbe French, and is the only real 
elfectual depilatory, in existence. Price 75 cents per 
package, sent post-paid, to any address, on receipt of 
an order by 

BERG.ER, SHL'TTS & CO., Chemists, 

285 River street, Troy, N. Y. 



IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE Fib- 
leeulli Judicial District ol the State ol California, in 
aud for the C'Hy and County of .-.'an Francisco. 

EDWARD J. QUIRK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES P. HOR- 
bach, et ais., Defendants 

Action brought in the District Court of the Fifteenth 
Judicial District ol the State of California, in and fur the 
City and County of San Fraucisco, aud the complaint liled 
lu lue said city aud county of Sau Fraucisco. iu the office 
of the Clerk ol said District Coin t. 

The People ol the Stale of Calilornia send greeting L<> 
JAMES P. HORBACH, HENRY DELVENDAHL, HENRY 
BREMMERMAN, ERNST JANSSBN and GUSTAV HELM- 
KE, Defendants: 

You are hereby required to appear in an action brought 
agaiust you by the above named PUiiuliir, iu the District 
Court ol the Fifteenth Judicial District of the Stale of 
California, in and for the city aud county of San Frau- 
cisco, aud to answer vhe complaint liled therein, within 
ten days (exclusive of the day of service) after the serv- 
ice on you of this Summons — u served within this coun- 
ty ; or, if served out of this county, but in this 
District, within twenty days, otherwise, within forty 
days — or judgment dy default will be taken against you, 
according to the prayer of said Comulaint. 

The said action is brought to require you, the said de- 
fendants,, lo set forth the nature of your respective claims 
to that certain lot or parcel of laud silu.'ite iu said city aud 
county of Sau Fraucisco, as particularly described iu the 
complaint herein, beiug subdivision No. 5 of the 1U0 vara 
lot known on the map of the city of Sau Francisco as No. 
276, as designated ou a plat of the original subdivision 
thereof, recorded in the office of the County Recorder of 
said city and County, iu Liber 1 of Certified Urauts, at page 
156, that all adverse claims of said defendants aud each of 
them may be determined by a decree of this Court; that by 
said decree it be declared and adjudged that the said dc 
feudauts, each aud all of them, nave no estate or interest 
whatever iu or to said parcel of laud, and that the title ol 
plaintiff thereto is good aud valid ; that said deleudauts, 
and each of them , be forever debarred from asserting any 
claim whatever in aud to said land adverse to plaintiff, and 
for such other and further relief as to this Hon. Court shall 
seem meet and agreeable to equity, with costs ol suit 
agaiust Such of the defendants as shall defend this action. 

And you are hereby notified that if you fail to appear 
and answer the said complaint, as above required, 
the said plaiutill will apply to the Court lor the reiiel 
demanded iu said complaint. 

Given under my hand and seal of the District Court 
of the Filteenth Judicial District of the State or Califor- 
nia, iu and for the city and county of Sau Fraucisco, this 
25th day of February , in the year of our Lord one thous- 
and eight hundred and sixty-seven. 

WM. LOEWY, Clerk, 
[SE4L.1 By Octavius Bell, Deputy Clerk, 

lut. Rev. Stamp, canceled, ou i ts. 
Thos. B. Bishop, Plaintiff's Attorney. mb30-13w 



pACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.'S 

STEAMSHIPS FOR 
NEW YORK, JAPAN AND CHINA, 

WILL BE DISPATCHED AS FOLLOWS : 
Leave Folsom-street Wharf at 11 o'clock a. m. of the 
following dates, for PANAMA, connecting via Panama 
Railroad with oue of the Company's splendid steamers 
Irom ASP1NWALL for NEW YORK. 
On loth, 18th, ?u d 30th of each month that has 30 days 
On loth, 19th, and 30th of each month that has 31 days' 
Wheu the loth, 19th and 30th fall on Sunday, they will 
leave on Saturday preceding ; when the 18th falls ou Sun- 
day, they will leave on Monday following. 

Steamer leaving San Francisco ou tho 10th touches at 
Mauzamllo. All touch at Acapulco 
Departure of 19th couuects with French Trausatlantic 

^ a '7h S / tCamerl ' 0rSl ' Nazaire . 1 ' u ' 1 Kuglish steamer 
lor South America. 

Departure of loth connects with English steamers for 
Southampton and south America, aud P R R r„ 
steamer lor Central America. ' 

ST8AMERS FOR JUNE. 
June 18th GOLDEN CITY, Capt J. T. Walking connect" 
iuk with ARIZONA, Capt. Harris "^.connect 
June 29th — MONTANA, Capt. Jos. Sutton, counectimr with 
OCEAN QUEEN, Capt. Maury. g 1D 

Passengers will be berthed through. Baggage checked 
through— 100 pounds allowed each adult. 

Surgeon ou board. Medicine and attendance free. 

These steamers will positively leave at 11 o'clock. Pas- 
sengers are requested to have their baggage on board be- 
lore 10 o'clock. 

Through tickets to Liverpool by the "Cunard," ' In 
man" aud "National" Steamship Lines can be obtained-at 
P. M. S. S. Co.'s office iu San Fraucisco. 

For Merchandise Freight apply to Wells, Fargo & Co. 

The splendid steamship COLORADO will be dispatched 
on July 4th, and will bo followed by the GREAT RE- 
PUBLIC, on August 24th, from wiiarl, corner of First and 
Braimou streets, lor YOKOHAMA and HONGKONG ; 
connecting at Yokohama with the steamer COSTA RICa' 
for SHANGHAI. 

For Passage and all other information, apply at Pacific 
Mail steamship company's office, corner of Sacramento and 
Leidcsdorll streets. 

OLIVER ELDRIDGE, A K ent. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. — ESTATE OF HENRY 
SHAMAN, Deceased. Notice is hereby given by the 
undersigned, Administratrix of tho above named estate, 
to the creditors of, aud all persons having claims 
against the said deceased, to exhibit the same with 
the necessary vouchers, within ten months after the lirst 
publication of this notice, lo the undersigned, at the 
office of D. P. Barstow, Esq., No. 6 Montgomery Block, 
in the city and county of Sau Francisco. 

JANE SEAMAN, 
Administratrix of the Estateof Henry Seamau, deceased. 
May 10th , 1867. myll 6vv 



STOCKDaLE house, 
Corner Main and Oak streets, Petaluma 

H. STOCKDALE Proprietor 



Great Reduction in Rates. 

QPPOSITION TO NEW YORK 
E VER Y TWENT Y DA YS ! 

Carrying tlte United Slates Moil via Nicaragua ! 
THE OPPOSITION STEAMER 

MOSES TAYLOR, 

Will sail for SAN JUAN DEL SUR, Nicaragua, from 
MIS-ION STREET WHARF, at 11 o'clock, A. H , on 

TUESDAY, - - - JUNE 25//*, 1867, 

Connecting at Greytown with the magnificent Steamship 
NEVADA. 3,000 tons, for NEW YORK. 

TBtThc AMERICA will sail July loth. 

For further information, applv lo 

I. W. RAYMOND, Agent, 

Northwest corner Battery and l'iue streets, up stmrs. 




MASONIC TEMPLE, 

Montgomery and Post streets, San Fraucisco. 
TO THE SICK! 

Cures Without Medicines. 

Experience of 25 years [15th (1K66) -in San Francisco,] 
enables DR. BOURNE lo Guarantee Cures ! He performs 
all he promises — more, if possible. Consultations Free. 
Call or send for circulars. 

10 MASONIC TEMPLE, POST STREET. 



A. FINIUAN'S 




NORFOLK STABLES, 

ELLIS STREET, BETWEEN POWELL AND MASON, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

THE FINEST STABLE KNOWN IN AMERICA. 

Horses, Buggies, and all kindsuf Carriages to let on rea- 
onable terms. Partlenlar attention paid to boarding 
horses. Ladies' and Gentlemen's Saddle Horses always 
on hand. P. A. FINIGAN, Proprietor. 



E. GOLDSMITH, 

Practical Card and Seal Engraver, 
AND PLATE PRINTER, 
No. 505 Montgomery street, over Tucker's. 



OWMAN & CO., 

DealerB in Stoves and Tin Ware, 

Main street, Petaluma. 



J 



16 



jyjAGU